Log Cabin Treatment Gone Wrong

Winter 2017 (update at bottom of page for Winter 2019)

As I’m writing this it is January 2017 and this is relevant as you read this post.

Occasionally we will receive pictures asking for advice on treatment when something has obviously gone wrong with a log cabin. We can also receive complaints about treatment that has been applied to our log cabins from customers who have used our own treatment or other log cabin treatment we have recommended.

Please see this page for our advice on the treatment of log cabins with our recommended treatments, ours and also others. Please also see this file for a discount from a local company who we highly recommend as do other professionals: Brewers Discount.

When treatment goes wrong

We will receive pictures such as these which do look rather awful and the poor ol’ log cabin is starting to look really sad. We usually receive pictures such as these during the late Autumn and Winter when there is a lot more moisture in the air, more rain of course and snow, generally pretty rubbish weather.

This will be when the treatment that is applied is really tested.

Here’s some examples of what will happen when it all goes wrong and your lovely log cabin starts to get some horrible problems.

Bad staining is forming at the bottom of the cabin.

Bad staining is forming at the bottom of the cabin.

Door trims have started to discolor

Door trims have started to discolor

Discolouration and marking of lower logs

Marking and possible spores forming on the door.

We also get sent pictures such as this which are a bit of a fib, you can see that there was a lot of discolouring before the treatment was applied. Perhaps there was a problem before hand?

A bit of a fib, you can see that the discolouration and marks are present under the treatment.

A bit of a fib, you can see that the discolouration and marks are present under the treatment.

This winter we also received this picture.

A picture of an internal wall sucking up moisture and resulting discolouration.

A picture of an internal wall sucking up the weather and resulting discolouration of the inside of the logs that are still wet. Wood is a sponge unfortunately!

All of the above problems are NOT caused by the treatment, they are ALL caused by:

  • Application of the Treatment
  • Amount of the Treatment used.
  • Depth of treatment applied – Basically the number of coats applied.

Please see this article where I talk about specifically about the depth of treatment and moisture content in a Log Cabin

Treatment Experiment

Every year I expect to get complaints such as the above, we get pictures and very occasionally we get arguments that the treatment has been applied as we advise or the manufacturer has advised.

January 2016 I made an experiment board so I can be sure of my advice and to give examples. Here it is:

Experimental treatment boards.

Experimental treatment boards.

These are my logs I painted and fixed to the side of our Shepherd hut display, in front of this is a veranda to make sure the logs are not in permanent sun light, I was trying to reproduce a sheltered postion.

I dated these in January 2016 as a reference and started with no treatment, one coat and all the way up to six coats of treatment. I only used our own supplied treatment which was:

Now a year later this is quite interesting and does show quite clearly what happens with the various coats that have been applied.

Now I can actually see this rather than rely on advice from my own experience, the treatment producers and experts have given me in the past, this is starting to show up where the faults may lie, now I can actually see what is happening and confirming what the faults in a treatment could be:

  • Application of the Treatment – how well and how carefully has it been put on.
  • Amount of the Treatment used.
  • Depth of treatment applied – Basically the number of coats applied.

No Coats

My experiment started with no coats of treatment at all.

No coats of treatment have been applied, this is completely bare wood.

No coats of treatment have been applied, this is completely bare wood.

As expected the wood is discoloured and not looking great. This though is of course not wood rotting – wood does not rot if allowed to dry out naturally. You can see though that some fungal spores are starting to form within the structure.

If you don’t ever treat your cabin you can expect the whole building to look like this. Treatment of log cabins

Completely untreated log cabin.

Completely untreated log cabin. This one is now very old but is still not rotten but it doesn’t look great.

Please see my advice on treating your log cabin, you really don’t want this happening to yours:

Carefree Protectant Timber Treatment

Here’s my experimental board using our Carefree Protectant Treatment

Carefree protection board

Carefree protection treatment board

You can see what happens with one coat of treatment, it simply is not enough. We recommend four coats of this treatment. Actually it only requires two coats but PROPER coats and this is always the problem with a totally clear treatment, you cannot see the damn stuff, you have no idea where you have treated! It was easy for me with a small log as I am pretty sure I coated it correctly.

Please note the ‘one coat treatment’ and compare to the pictures at the top of this post. Similar?

Now look at the ‘two coats’ log, you will still see some discolouration, mainly with the tongue part which has borne most of the weather and maybe also where I was a little thin in my application.

Then again look at the third log, it’s better but finally look at the fourth…. now everything is well covered, we know even on the parts you are missing which is happening with a clear treatment you will be getting at least two proper coats on the log.

This of course doesn’t just apply to our own very clear Carefree treatment but also to other producers of treatment.

A clear treatment, in my experience is the WORST to apply as you cannot see where you have been and that results in problems such as those shown in the pictures above.

Embadecor Timber Stain

Here’s my experimental board using our Embadecor Stain Treatment

Embadecor timber stain experimental board.

Embadecor timber stain experimental board.

A stain or a paint is a lot easier to apply properly as you can see where it is and how you applied it. This has worked very well and I am not seeing anything bad here. But there are big differences between one coat and three coats. Please see the previous articles on advice, three coats will at least give you the depth your require to keep your log cabin from problems and absorption as shown in one of the pictures above.

Embalan Timber Paint

Here’s my experimental board using our Embalam Paint Treatment

I was really pleased with the paint, it went on well, I tried a further experiment one that was as standard:

Embalan standard paint

Embalan standard paint

With one costs you can still see the grain coming through, maybe like one of the ‘fib’ pictures above? Three coats is working well (most paint suppliers will recommend three coats and often include an undercoat) Four and five are perfect!

Then I tried mixing, we wanted a darker colour for the highlight on the doors and window of the Shepherd Hut:

Mix of paints from the Embalan range.

Mix of paints from the Embalan range.

Maybe it was due to the colour but this worked really well, yes there is a difference in the coats, maybe four seems to be the best?

Treatment Recommendations and Problems

With my experiment I think I have shown what happens, I’m going to leave the logs out for another year to see how this develops and follow up in 2018.

My advice …. is …. please follow my advice and avoid some horrible problems happening with your log cabin … oh and don’t cheat or fib ….. the Autumn and Winter will decide how well you have treated your Log Cabin.

Also, please watch out for:

  • Application of the Treatment – how well has your coverage been applied?
  • Amount of the Treatment used – Have you applied the right amount of coats?
  • Depth of treatment applied – Basically the number of coats applied. Have you applied the right amount of coats according to recommendation?
  • MAKE sure you treat the door and window trims and quadrants / beads- These are often missed as it is close to the glass and hard to do and you maybe applying a thinner coat?- Maybe consider removing the glass for better coating.
  • Be careful at the lower levels of the log cabin. These four or five logs get the most weather, treat them accordingly.
  • Be really careful when using a clear treatment to thoroughly cover the log.
  • Pay extra care to lower logs any ledges / tongues.
  • Thoroughly coat the corners and any joins.

Continuation

I am going to leave the experiment up for another year to see what happens, this is really quite interesting ……

More … I’ve recently been asked about our treatments:  This post relates entirely to the Tuin range of Log Cabin Treatments and clarifies what and how we recommend they are used if you choose to use our range.

UPDATE – Winter 2019

My experiment continues with the treatment boards and it’s still pretty interesting what is happening 3 years on.

My timber treatment experiment which I started in 2016 as a way to see exactly what can happen.

The embalan paint if still performing well. The board right at the bottom received no treatment at all, it’s interesting to see there is no rot whatsoever. We’re proving well that three coats and above is giving the best protection. I’m also proving that timber, when allowed to dry naturally does not generally rot.

I did also start another experiment in August 2017 just to see what will happen to a log in constant ground contact. I’ll come back to this is August 2019 to see what, if anything, has happened.

The mix of Embalan paint is also doing very well, the three to five coats are still almost perfect.

The Embadecor stain is doing the best and even with one coat it is still looking very good. Again thought, three to four coats is performing the best. However, bear in mind a stain is just that, ideally it needs a top coat of a sealant such as the clear embadecor or the carefree to ensure the wood is sealed, especially in the corner and joints.

My favoured treatment is also still doing very well. You can see though that as it is a totally clear treatment it is essential to make sure of coverage. I wish I had painted the ends rather than just the surface as you can see how the weather has pushed in. Again three coats and above is most effective.

What if it has gone wrong?

For an easy solution on how to get the timber clean again before re-treatment please see this post: Cleaning a Log Cabin

Pent Installation Roof Advice

A little insight to how you can format the parts of our Modern log cabins

If you would like to follow along to a video tutorial, see our Installing a Pent Log Cabin video filled with tips on ensuring the longevity of your Log Cabin.

So you have built up your new log cabin up to roof height and you will come across a sight like the one below, the skeleton of a roof ready to be finished off.

Up to roof height with purlins added

I have made a quick guide which I hope proves useful, there are different methods in doing this roof style that you may prefer to use.

Firstly lets identify all the roof components that we will eventually call upon, in this case we have the two-tiered eaves boards for all four sides, squared battens and a mixture of mounting slats and blocks, sometimes the eaves boards for the longer cabins arrive in half lengths which when offered up to one another span the full required length. 

Identifying Roof Components

A good opportunity is often missed at this stage which is treatment and plenty of it as a lot of these parts become very inaccessible once you get further along, for more guidance on what treatments to use you may be interested in the following; https://www.tuin.co.uk/blog/log-cabin-treatment-again/

To begin with let us install the mounting blocks on the front and back of this particular log cabin, these provide more support for the eaves boards when you fit them, sometimes these blocks can be fitted to the sides instead, depending on the model, to fix these I am going to use a two of the 60mm screws at each point.

Starting to install the mounting blocks

Please do not think too long and hard where the mounting blocks need to be placed, as if the plans in front of you do not show a specific precise location, as the eaves boards may have arrived disassembled as shown in the second image above, just place them in a realistic fashion and copy the same for the back.

Mounting blocks also fitted to the back wall

The mounting blocks have all been fitted, so now it is time to think about making up the eaves boards, in this case we have been supplied with a narrow and a wider board, these two together make up the full eaves height, you may have seen that the plans are telling me to use the wider boards on the top, so let us do just that.

Eaves boards ready to be assembled

To join the two boards together we need to use the mounting slats supplied in the kit and identified earlier, anything can be used including spare pallet timber.
Please pilot drill these before securing them, by doing this with any wood you can be more sure that the wood will not split or crack, make sure their locations are correct, use the roof as a guide lining up the slats with the blocks already in place or take measurements.

Offering Eaves boards up to the fitted block locations to aid positioning

Screw the mounting slats all onto one side of the boards, I used 30mm screws which worked nicely.

Screws sent though the mounting slats into the eaves boards

Mounting slats lining up with mounting blocks and overhanging the wall logs/purlins.

Mounting slats lining up with mounting blocks

Now we have all the eaves boards made up as well as all mounting blocks and slats fitted, we then need to think about how we want the chosen roof material to be formatted.Roofing Felt, Easy Roofing or EPDM

Felt, Easy roofing and EPDM Roofing for our pent roofed log cabins

Fitting roofing felt, Our aim is to fold this under the roof edge on all four sides of the roof securing it into place using the supplied battens or sourced trims.

Fitting Easy Roofing ( ERM ) this is an easier solution to roofing felt and requires no nails as its all self adhesive, A heat gun in the colder months of the year is suggested to enhance the overlaps

Fitting EPDM now we save the best until last! The Epdm rubber roof, supplied with a spray adhesive and laid straight onto a “clean dust free roof”, like with the easy roof you would dish this up on the inside faces of the eaves boards on all four sides or just the front three

FELT ROOFING FIRST

We do have a video showing how felt in general is laid which for the basic principle is important as well as our very detailed online installation manual for pretty much everything you would need to know about getting the cabin constructed from the ground up; https://www.tuin.co.uk/blog/tuin-tuindeco-log-cabins-instruction-manual/

but more specifically here for a pent roofs which we hope helps further.

Assuming it is felt that we are fitting today we need to get the roof boards on before anything else, However what we like to suggest at this stage is to temporally tac your front eaves on first as this then gives you a line to offer them all up against knowing they will be correct.

Eaves boards fixed to the blocks ready for the roof boards

You may find that the mounting slats obstruct some of the roof boards from sitting flush so I am trimming them down, or I could have trimmed the relevant roof boards instead to slot around them.

Cutting the mounting slats so the roof boards fit flush, The roof boards could be trimmed instead where required

With the slats trimmed the roof boards sit flush against the inside face

When you go to fit the last roof board you nearly always need to rip it down to allow it to sit flush with the ends of the purlin(s)

Remember to use two nails or screws per board at every junction as the roof boards are key to strengthening the whole building, in the summer leave a 2mm gap
in-between each board whereas in the winter you close them up as tight as possible.

After that you can then remove the front eaves board as its time to fit the felt.

As mentioned, we really want to get the felt wrapped round the ends of the roof boards and under, most cabins come with battens to attach the felt under the boards, in this instance I have been supplied with the two long lengths as shown in a previous picture, I will use these and any other spare pallet timber to secure the felt if needed.

An example of how to finish the roofing felt around the ends of the roof boards

Another example showing how to overcome obstructions

You will at points have to work your way around the mounting blocks, purlins or wall logs, you could remove the blocks temporally while the felt is fitted. you can also leave the felt simply wrapped round the sides of the roof boards to avoid the obstacles but just be sure they are secured down in some way either using Felt Glue or clout nails, Ideally both.

After the felt is fully installed you can then fit all your eaves boards around all sides, the natural gap at the back is there to allow the water to drain off the roof

Expect a gap at the back of the roof, This is for drainage

EPDM or ERM Rubber Roofing

For more specific guidance on the actual installation of the rubber itself, Please visit the following for support and advice

https://www.tuin.co.uk/Easy-Roofing-Membrane.html

EPDM on LOG CABINS roofs.

For this cabin we opted for the Easy roofing as it is the best with no overlaps, the same fitting aid also applies for the Easy roofing, for these rubber options I am going to dish the roofing up on the front three sides then wrap it around the back to allow the run off.

After the initial stage of fixing all mounting blocks onto the cabin I am going to go ahead and fix all four completed eaves boards onto the sides of the roof.

A close up of a corner, Mounting slats cut and uncut as preferred

An extra pair of hands is useful for this part, but you could use clamps if you have some large enough. I screwed through the outside fascia of the eaves boards through the mounting slat into the mounting block with two 70mm screws at each point.

Eaves boards fitted at the back, Note they sit higher than those at the front due to the roof pitch

All eaves boards in place and ready for roof boards followed by the EPDM roofing

With them all fitted to the perimeter of the roof I’m ready to fit the roof boards following the same process as we did for the felt part of the guide.

Dishing of the rubber roofing can be formatted in different ways, As an example you can just have the rubber coming upwards against the inside face and apply a hidden trim to cap it off, however it is best to actually wrap the rubber around the top of the eaves board and down the other side as it helps prevent any possible ingress under it, you can then cap this off as you wish.

You may like to cut the mounting slats down on the front three sides like we did for the felt approach early as this makes offering the Epdm rubber roof easier to lay on the inside face of the boards.

Roof boards start getting laid, Remember two nails per board at every junction

Examples of how the rubber roofing can be dished up

Then for the back where the natural drainage gap is we are going to wrap it around the side of the roof boards, Some fitters at this point will actually make cuts into the tops of the blocks so they can get the EPDM wrapped further around, But you can just glue and tac the roofing to the sides

Some fitters will be very clever at this stage and actually cut a channel into the tops of the mounting blocks, eventually fitting a guttering length directing the water into a downpipe, you may need to increase the wood size of the block used depending on the gutter size, you can then glue the EPDM into the inner face of the gutter instead.

With a channel cut on the back overhangs you can fit a guttering length rigged up to a downpipe

I will mention once again that the methods above do not have to be strictly followed, “like anything in this world there are always room for enhancements!. “So fill your boots ladies and gents” and have a go. Any questions please feel free to contact us for advice

Newcastle Log Cabin Customer Build

Hello everyone,

It’s been a little time since we’ve had an in depth customer review – Understandable with this heat, not many people would want to install their log cabins in the recent months. But we do have a fair few customers who like to challenge the heat! For example, Mr & Mrs C, who have kindly summed up their journey of their Newcastle Log Cabin installation within this article.


Mr C writes as follows:

After weeks of research it looked by all accounts that Tuin were the people to buy from! And after several hours reading the wealth of information on their site I was not only convinced these guys knew what they were talking about, but also had a real passion for the product. Si, I hit the button and bought a Tuin 58mm Newcastle cabin, to become my new office/workshop.

The cabin arrived bang on time and unloading was a doddle with their side loading forklift. I was relieved to find the whole package was very securely wrapped and un-damaged. The cabin had to sit on the drive for a week as I finished off the groundworks, but the packing kept everything dry and clean.

The Unloaded Newcastle Log Cabin Package

First job was to clear the site. A step ladder, a beer and a chainsaw! What’s the worst that could happen right? (Not recommended! – Meg)

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Next was a quick beer while the wife unloaded the hardcore – Then while we waited for her to break the larger lumps up! (I hope you realise that I’m making this bit up right?)

Access was tricky, but a concrete pump soon got the job done!

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Base finished! Ready for the retailing wall. 28° heat, what could be better than digging sleepers into the ground 🙁

Newcastle Base Prep

Next, the build begins. (Seemed a shame to hide my nice retaining wall) Unfortunately, the cabin wall bearers had twisted badly in the searing heat. This made the first logs down a little tricky, but as the walls started to go up the bearers had little choice but to flatten out.

Newcastle Log Cabin Wall Installation

Every log slotted into the next like they were machined out of metal, I was amazed at the accuracy of each cut. The logs were straight and clean – I was starting to feel quite happy!

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End of day one! Apart from being sick of hammering nails into roof boards, everything else had gone like clockwork.

Newcastle Log Cabin Roofboard Installation

Next day came the doors and roof. (Oh, goody, more nails!) The shingles were of excellent quality and easy to lay. I had opted to insulate from within the cabin, so we just laid them out on to the roof boards.

Newcastle Log Cabin Roof Shingles

I think the floor was my biggest disappointment – after the way the rest of the cabin had gone together, I was expecting the floor to do the same? But, some of the cuts were not accurate on the ends of the boards and some different widths. But at the end of the day it’s just a floor. (Note: Our floors come in generic packs and are not cut to fit specific cabins, that’s why we try to give you more than enough to floor your Log Cabin – We’re sorry you had difficulties! – Meg)

Newcastle Log Cabin Floor

I have now been in my new cabin for a month, during this time we haven’t had a drop of rain and 30+ degree temperatures! The cabin is drying out, but (so far) the wood is being extremely stable. The few small cracks that appeared as we installed it have (more or less) stayed as they were. Nothing has warped or buckled.

I really am being honest when I say, we are extremely pleased with our decision to buy a Tuin Log Cabin. Everything from start to finish has been great! I did have to call for a silly question and the aftersales help was brilliant – A big thank you to Alex and the Tuin team!

The Treated Newcastle Log Cabin

Finished!! 🙂


I must say, that shade of treatment really does suit the Newcastle Log Cabin! I’d just like to say a big thank you to Mr and Mrs C for their honest review of our products – We are sorry to hear that you had problems regarding the flooring, but are relieved that you still love your log cabin!

Interested in more reviews like Mr and Mrs C’s? You can find a load more at: Tuin Pictorial Customer Reviews.

Expansion in Log Cabins

Two Extremes with Log Cabins

There are two extremes of the year in a log cabins first year of life; The height of Summer and the depths of Winter. Both of these times may possibly cause problems for you depending on the level of treatment you gave your cabin when you installed it. These problems will generally only be noticeable in the first year cycle of a newly built log cabin as I explain in the articles referenced below.

The problems are one of either expansion or contraction of the wall logs that make up your log cabin.

But, with that said you should never, ever notice this movement, such is the design of most log cabins. The building will grow and shrink un-noticed by you…..

BUT ….. only if it has been built, treated, and vented correctly and also with the correct layer of damp proof membrane on top of or within the base. The correct treatment though cannot be stressed enough, as it will inhibit both these natural features of wood and you will never have a problem or even notice what your log cabin is doing over the seasons.

Contraction of logs in your log cabin – Summer

In the summer we will see contraction and I have written a lot about it in a previous article: Moisture Content of a Log Cabin and Depth of Treatment this article is helpful as it explains the intake and expulsion of moisture from the relative humidity and explains how each log can expand and contract by as much as around 3 – 5mm per log. Over the course of a building log height you have a potential movement of about 80mm, that’s about 3 inches! Sometimes it will be more if the building has received little or no treatment and within its first 12 months of being installed.

A second article which will interest you on the subject of timber movement within a log cabin is: Contraction of a Log Cabin this article explains what can happen in the height of summer, and when a log cabin has had little or no treatment.

Expansion of logs in your log cabin – Winter

Here are some examples of problems that may occur, all of which are down to the natural expansion of timber within the winter months, most of which could be avoided with treatment, damp proof membrane and in some cases ventilation and correct installation of your log cabin.

White bits:

The most common area that you will notice with expansion in your log cabin is when white bits start appearing.

Classic winter expansion of logs in a log cabin – notice the bare wood appearing above the door fascia

Expansion of the logs has caused bare wood to appear from behind the window fascia

For log cabins built around July, August, September and a little later this is fairly common to see and is entirely normal. This is happening as the logs are inherently a sponge and made up of 1000’s of straws which of course the tree used to suck up water from the ground, this is what is happening with the logs during the winter months, they are sucking in moisture and expanding.

This is entirely normal and one that can be easily inhibited by the correct application of a good quality treatment. We also advise in our Log Cabin Treatment Advice article that when treating your log cabin to also paint behind the fascias to the side and above and you will then never notice this expansion taking place at all. If correctly treated it may not even take place at all!

Wood is made up of 1000’s of straws, all of them are designed to suck up moisture from the ground. In the correct treatment of a log cabin our aim is to block these straws as much as possible to inhibit the natural expansion and contraction

Gaps Appearing

During the summer months we can sometimes see gaps appearing if the cabin is not treated well of built correctly. During the winter we can very occasionally see another form of gap appearing and this is generally above the door.

A gap has started to appear above the door as the logs have expanded so much the contraction space has started to appear.

We have seen this a few times in extreme cases, this is very easily solved with a shim placed under the door and the checklist at the bottom of this article followed come the warmer months.

Frames Apart

In our Log Cabin installation advice page and also the instructions that come with all log cabins we do try to get across the importance of NOT fixing anything across two or more logs, including the doors and window frame and fascias as the wall logs need to be able to move independently due to their contraction and expansion. Sometimes though this advice is not followed.

If door or window fascias are fixed to wall logs you can see the expansion of the logs may force the frames apart – never fix log together or inhibit their natural movement!

Fixing fascia that are attached to the top logs to the door frame can be pulled apart by the expansion force.

This door frame is being pulled apart as the top fascia has been fixed to the top wall log, as the logs expand the top part of the frame is pulled upwards by considerable expansion force.

Below is another good example of the door frame being pulled apart from the top fascia being fixed to the wall log. See how evident the rogue screw is, as well as how much expansion has been caused from the force the screw has created:

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Floor and Roof

The floor and roof of your log cabin is also affected by expansion and contraction and as we advise it is important to consider the time of year you are installing, at the height of summer you will need to ensure you leave a small expansion gap between the boards. In the case of the floor it is very important to leave room for expansion all around so the floor does not push against the sides of the log cabin.

It is very important to leave an expansion gap all the way around the floor as highlighted in our installation advice, this will then avoid a roof, or floor, from rippling when the winter comes.

Treatment

It is always at this time of year that we get a series of complaints that all can be traced back to treatment, I wrote this article at the same time last year: Log Cabin Treatment Gone Wrong this highlights a lot of the issues when treatment is not correctly applied or the good quality treatment used.

Log cabin treatment gone wrong

If our advice has not been followed regarding treatment it is the height of winter when it will become most obvious.

Problems with treatment will not only manifest itself by unsightly marks as above but you may also have leaks in extreme driving rain conditions. The is due to ineffective or cheap treatment being used which then cracks and allows water to ingress via capillary action. This can also be caused by treatment not being applied correctly, particularly one of the cheaper shade treatment requires light sanding, wiping with spirits and at the least two coats applied within a few hours to be effective, the manufacturer goes on to state that with dry wood three coats should be applied, it is often overlooked as well that a wood preservative is required under many cheaper treatments. Without following any manufacturers explicit instructions any treatment will be ineffective and problems during at least the first year of a log cabin life can be expected.  We would recommend at least four coats of any treatment correctly used. For more advise on this please see: Log Cabin Treatment Advice.

Water Ingress

There are a number of reasons for water ingress, the most likely is lack of treatment, a poor quality treatment or an ineffective treatment, especially in the corners and importantly on the end grain, this is particularly important to stop tracking of water via capillary action via the grooves in the profile of the logs.

Capillary action can allow a weap to follow the logs in a building that has not fully settled or been treated carefully in the corners, tongue and groove or the end grain.

Little or no treatment has been applied to this log cabin. Water marks are now becoming evident in the corners and some mould build up on the door.

As I have mentioned before. Wood is made to act like a sponge. If it is not treated correctly it will absorb water by its nature. This door did not receive a very good level of treatment and over the course of a year has absorbed a lot of water. A great deal of this could have been avoided with a good treatment and of course ventilation within the cabin if it is closed up for long periods of time.

Until a building has fully settled over a period of a year and gone through it’s various cycles it is possible to have driving rain force into the corner joints. BUT, this is very easily prevented by the correct application of a good quality treatment as all the joints are sealed.

Water ingress along the bottom few logs pushed via driving rain. A good quality treatment correctly applied prevents this. I have noticed that some pictures of issues will show this area more often. As can seen from a treatment picture further up this post the lower part of the cabin is missed, possibly as it is harder to treat due to bending over? It may also be that this area takes more driving weather? I think though from experience it would be a good idea to concentrate on this area if you think the log cabin is exposed when you treat it.

Condensation

Condensation is occasionally overlooked and this can affect your building greatly. As we advise it is vitally important that a damp proof membrane is incorporated within your base on top of it. Advice on this can be found in our Log Cabin installation advice article.

Even with a DPM, condensation can still build up in your log cabin if it is not regularly used, in this case it is highly advisable to fit some sort of vent. More advice can be found in our Ventilation in Log Cabins article.

As well as ingress from outside it is possible for condensation to build up inside a cabin if not regularly used or ventilated.

Condensation can also manifest itself as damp spores on the roof and walls. This is a mild case but the building does need some sort of ventilation when closed up for long periods.

On a larger scale, especially when a DPM is not fitted so much moisture can be built up it actually looks as if there is a leak in the roof. Ventilation will resolve this problem.

Doors and Windows

Last night I had an email from a friend who said ‘don’t go around the back to the conservatory door as it’s stuck, it’s always like that when its cold’. I smiled to myself, of course it has nothing to do with the cold, it’s everything to do with treatment and inhibiting the expansion of the wood in her patio doors. It’s exactly the same with a log cabin door set and windows, they will react in exactly the same way if they do not have enough layers of good quality treatment applied.

Doors and windows, if not treated well enough and certainly within the first year, may expand and could become tight in the frame. Ideally doors and windows should be treated both inside and outside to guard against expansion and contraction which can in turn cause warps in a frame

Summary of Expansion in your Log Cabin

All the above points affect any log cabin no matter the manufacturer and indeed any timber structure both inside and outside of your home.

If you have any of these issues, please do not worry, they can all be solved easily.

  • White Bits: This is the easiest to solve, wait until the weather improves and then remove the fascia, you can then paint behind them and you will never notice this again.
  • Gaps appearing above your doors or above the windows. This is easily solved by raising the door or window frame and then inserting a packer the length of the frame. The gap will then be hidden behind the fascia. You will need to remember you did this and consider removing it in the Spring when the log cabin starts to contract again.
  • Frames or trim parting: It is very likely that fascia or frames have been attached somehow to the logs. Please remove any fixings you can find. Doors and windows can easily be removed by taking off the fascia, please then make sure the whole frame is refixed together and reinstall. Do NOT fix any part of it to the wall logs or trim mounted on the corner triangle (in the case of corner log cabins)
  • Floor and Roof: This will be a little trickier to solve. For the roof I have found more nails can be added and it is generally enough to solve the problem as it can still expand across the whole length. The floor maybe pushing against the wall logs, check for this and if it is the case you must create an expansion gap all the way around. A jig saw will be able to accomplish this. In extreme cases you may need to consider a whole new replacement floor.
  • Water Ingress: This one is a little trickier during the winter months and it is probably best to leave it until the warmer Spring months. You will need to review your treatment process and what you used. For cheaper shade treatments you will have sanded the walls, washed it with white spirit, applied a preservative, then applied at least three coats in batches of 4 – 5 hours. Better treatments such as Sikkens and ours will generally need three coats, sometimes an undercoat is also required. For our carefree protect treatment this can be applied direct and built up to three – four coats over a number of days for full protection. Make sure you have read and fully actioned the manufacturers instructions. Please see our depth of treatment article for more advice. You will need to consider re-treating your log cabin and also upgrading the treatment you originally applied. As we advise, if you use a top quality treatment, correctly applied these problems are unlikely to occur. The first thing, by eye you can notice if a treatment is a good quality is ….. is there stretching of the treatment across the joints over the winter? You can often see this, a cheap treatment will simply crack and that is when ingress can occur through capillary action. Look out for this!
  • Condensation: Please check an effective and un-punctured DPM has been applied within or on top of your base. This is your first port of call for a condensation problem. If you are not sure or one has not been applied the floor will need to be lifted and one fitting. If it has and the building is closed for long periods over the Autumn and Winter please consider adding at least one vent into your building. More advice can be found here: Ventilation in Log Cabins
  • Doors and Windows: On most of our log cabins the hinges can be adjusted to account for this, please see this page for advice: Log Cabin Doors you will also need to consider the treatment advice above, ideally doors and windows will be treated equally both inside and outside.

First Year of Life! 

It’s odd but after a year and completing the cycle a log cabin seems to settle down a lot, I think it is because the straws in the wood make up has dropped, crushed or have been blocked, after a year all these things seem to settle and almost disappear.

Some of the above may have left marks or stains which take away from the aesthetics of you building, however, all is not lost and can be easily cleaned again, please see this page for advice: Cleaning a Log Cabin

Blackpool Log Cabin Feature

On the Blackpool Log Cabin product page, we show you plenty of images of our customer’s Log Cabin to show you what you can do with them. As well as all the fine details on the dimensions, technical tips as well as our quality checks for each Log Cabin.

But, understandably, that just doesn’t do the Log Cabin enough justice. That’s why on this page we’ve collected as many pictures, videos and detailed reviews as we can to create this customer feature page, so here goes:

Blackpool Log Cabin

The Blackpool Log Cabin , 58mm thick wood and double glazed windows and doors.

Made from 58mm slow grown Spruce timber, the Blackpool Log Cabin comes at a size of 4.4m x 3.4m. A perfect size for additional living areas, a home gym, home pub- even a garden office! Get plenty of natural light inside this Log Cabin with its full frontal double glazed doors and side windows. A durable building with its cost balancing out with future heating costs (especially if you add insulation!).

Reviews:

You dont have to just take our word, here are some excerpts from our many Blackpool Log Cabin Reviews – averaging out to five star ratings:

“The cabin itself is light and spacious, the window can be swapped on either side (the middle window pops off to make lifting it easier!). All the materials are really good quality and sturdy and the build itself was rather straightforward, with 3 of us on it, it took about 4 hours to get to the point of putting roof boards on!” – Mr A Bentham

“For the money, the Blackpool Cabin seems unbeatable, especially with free roof shingles – 58mm logs, spruce (superior to the ubiquitous pine), double glazed, metal door trim, higher end windows. The floor is not included which prompted me to use the slab as a floor, as suggested on the web site. Great suggestion which had not occurred to me.” – Mrs Y Clarke

“The Blackpool cabin is exceptionally high quality, finished to a really high standard and fitted together very quickly. I would recommend this cabin to anyone and am very happy with it for the price I paid. I had a few issues with the cabin whilst building it, but contacted Tuin who quickly responded and sorted the problems out without any fuss. i would recommend using them for both their quality of building materials and their response to help out with any issues i had.” – Mr Wagstaff

Among these reviews, we also received a detailed review from a customer who showed us with the use of images and narration their experience installing the Blackpool Log Cabin:

Installation: 

So long as you keep organised and follow suit of the information given on the Essential Installation Manual, as well as plenty of other Log Cabin Fitting Tips that are posted throughout the blog- written by our one and only, Richard.

Here are some of our favourite sets of installation images sent in by a customer:

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Installed: 

When installed, there are endless ways in which you can treat/paint your Blackpool log cabin, here are some of our favourite examples:

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Customer Pictures:

If you would like to see more photo’s from customers please click on the picture below – Note: This will take you to our customers photo gallery hosted by Google Photos. Pictures may show older models or customer own modifications.

Blackpool log cabin customer gallery

We asked a Tuin team member, Elizabeth, about what her favourite features of the Blackpool are- and why the UK market would love it too:

“I like the Blackpool Log Cabin for the amount of natural light that can come in through the front facing doors and additional windows on the size. They’re all double glazed so that along with the 58mm log thickness, I believe the Blackpool will store heat well. Because of the heat capacity and the amount of natural light coming in- I can see why a lot of our customers use them as garden offices” 

I was thinking the same, the cost of the cabin will balance out on heating costs over the years- but we recommend insulation in the roof and floor to make sure it really stays nice and cosy in the colder months!

Blackpool Log Cabin

The Blackpool Log Cabin , 58mm thick wood and double glazed windows and doors.

For more details such as precise measurements, pricing and a list of what will be included within the self build kit, please see the Blackpool Log Cabin product page.

If the Blackpool isn’t quite for you, why not take a look at the Aiste Log Cabin Showcase, or if you desire the 58mm log thickness- then the Stian Log Cabin might be more suitable.

Log Cabin Offers

As we are preparing our 2018 catalogue, unfortunately we’re going to have to let go a few of our Log Cabins. So as a parting gift to some of our well known cabins, we are offering discounts!
See below for which cabins these include, this page will be updated as more offers come in, while stocks last!

In addition to these, we have recently added more offers around the site! Even with Log Cabins that will be staying in next years catalogue. You can start by looking in our Log Cabin page- these offers are available until the end of the year!

The Offers Available Are As Follows: 


The Gigamodern Log Cabin. 

The Gigamodern Log Cabin

Featuring a contemporary flat roof, storage shed and large open side shelter supported by two posts.

With flat roof, the 40mm Giga Modern Log Cabin is designed to imitate the wide, horizontal lines of the natural landscape. Perfect for adding a contemporary feel to any garden, this log cabin combines a storage shed and side shelter into one practical building.

The Gigamodern Log Cabin– Now available for £2,358!


The Supermodern Log Cabin.

The Supermodern Log Cabin

Flat roof Super Modern Log Cabin measuring 4.2 x 4.2m. With centrally positioned double doors flanked by two bottom-hung sash windows.

The Supermodern Log Cabin is a contemporary style Cabin with a sleek flat roof, centrally positioned double doors and high positioned windows. Made from 40mm Spruce timber, the supermodern is a stunning design that offers all year round use!

The Supermodern Log Cabin– Now available for £2185.50!


The Lisette Garden Office Studio.

The Lisette Log Cabin

The Lisette garden office studio measures 6.09 x 3.64m and features double glazing and double skin 19mm clad walls.

The Lisette is split into two, one side an enclosed office and the other open as a gazebo, this layout is perfect for a multifunctional garden building. Making this Log Cabin perfect to be used as: a summerhouse, garden office, art/music studio and more!

The Lisette Log Cabin– Now available for £3,819.85!


The Kajsa Modern Studio.

The Kajsa Modern Studio

A contemporary flat roof model in 19mm cladding, the Kaisja studio features a double door and two fixed windows. Dimensions are 2.72 x 2.01m.

This Modern Studio may be smaller in size, but doesn’t stop you from having crisp, clean lines from the Spruce Cladding. With the two fixed windows being adaptable for either side of the Cabin, this is a perfect Log Cabin for art/music studios.

The Kajsa Modern Studio– Now available for £1,268.90!


The Morten Log Cabin 

Morten Gazebo Log Cabin

A unique combination, the Morten features both a gazebo and shed annexe in one garden building. Measuring 3.5 x 5.0m and manufactured using 28m tongue and groove logs.

Who needs a separate Gazebo and Storage Shed when you have them both with the Morten? Inspired by the log cabin summerhouse and shed combinations, a full height partition creates a distinction between the two functions. It also offers flexibility with the Gazebo being able to be installed on either side of the Shed.

The Morten Log Cabin– Now available for £2,112.23!


The Amstelveen Modern Log Cabin.

Amstelveen Log Cabin

The Amstelveen 28mm Log Cabin measures overall at 5.82m x 2.48m- Including the incorporated canopy area.

A cabin that screams modern, the Amstelveen Log Cabin features a three measure length gazebo, with a 2.8m x 2.48m Cabin ideal for storage use or as a main summerhouse. The Amstelveen offers all the functionality and versatility of a conventional garden shed. Yet instead of panels, this building is constructed using interlocking 28mm Swedish pine logs.

The Amstelveen Modern Log Cabin– Now available for £1,410.19!


This page was last updated on the 20/2/2018

Keep an eye on this page or follow our social media pages to be notified when this list has been updated!

Daisy Log Cabin and Annexe Show Site Build

Hello everyone! So, while I (Meg) was out of the office for a week, the office still continued to work non stop! I came back to christmas decorations everywhere and a new showsite install! At first I was a bit disappointed the installation of the Daisy Log Cabin and 28mm Side Annex without me but one of our new/training sales assistants, Becky, told me she carried out some of the installation! Its an excellent way to learn about our products and how they are installed and she was even so kind enough to do her own write up about it for you guys!


Becky writes as follows: 

I’m new to the Tuin team and wanted to get hands on in the assembly of a log cabin to gain a better understanding of the process behind it, enabling myself to then be able to give personal and experienced advice to our customers as part of the Sales Team.

I would just like to point out that when I started I had absolutely zero DIY knowledge, skills or experience.
Furthermore assembling the cabin in the cold, rain and snow was also an experience, although it was a great opportunity to prove that bad weather never hinders the construction of a cabin, apart from my cold fingers!
Additionally, I can confidently say that building a cabin is not as hard as I first believed. Once you know what you’re doing, everything just slots together and before you know it it’s up!

On my third week of training I was given the opportunity to construct the roof on the Daisy and build the annexe on the side.
I put up my step ladder inside the cabin alongside one of our more experienced members of the team and together we fitted the roof of the Daisy. It was all tongue and groove so the pieces of timber literally just slotted together and then we nailed it in.
For starters I had never even held a hammer before this point let alone hammer roof nails in!

Roofboard Installation

Seems like the sun came out to give you the perfect selfie lighting- The roof behind you is looking great!

The further along the roof we went the space to put up the ladder was running out, it was time to get on top of the roof!
I was surprised at how sturdy it actually was because I was prepared to be falling through. So there I was at the end of November on my knees nailing on the roof boards. (Though because I was the one to put my name in to helping.. I did make sure to wrap up! It was just very cold haha)
In between multiple cups of coffee purely to warm up my insides, the roof was on.
It was a good opportunity to gain an understanding of the natural contraction and expansion of timber. But with a firm knock into place the roof looked pretty good if I do say myself.

Log Cabin Wall With Coffee

You look energised for your future tasks thanks to coffee!

Then came the shingles, what I perceived to be the next challenge but they in fact were also very easy to do! We started from the bottom of the roof, with the first set upside down to ensure coverage of the roof, and from then on worked our way up to the ridge.

I was then trusted enough to build the annexe by myself. Just me, the timber and the plans…

Firstly I made a level base with just three pieces of tanalised timber, I secured the annexe base using screws and then screwed the base into the side foundation beam of the Daisy Log Cabin; ensuring my base was 100% flat, level and square I was all set to go.
The starter half logs are simply put normal logs just cut in half so that they have a flat bottom, making it easy to sit on top of the foundation beams. You don’t have to, but I screwed these onto the foundation beams just for extra stability.

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From here on the rest of the logs just slotted on top of each other, about five logs up I stopped and lowered the door into place. I was clear to see that it was a good thing I didn’t go any higher as I wouldn’t have been able to lift the door up high enough to slide it into place. From here I continued to knock the rest of the logs on top of each other.
Then it came to the roof, which was pretty much exactly the same as the Daisy Log Cabin but thankfully not as high.

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I started from the front of the annexe and worked my way towards the back, The roof boards were also tongue and groove making it nice and easy for them to all slot together. I was nailing these in as I went two at the top, middle and bottom onto the purlins.

It’s not quite finished yet, just the shingles to go, but overall it was an enjoyable first experience of building a Log Cabin and Annexe. By continuously referring back to the plans and taking my time to make sure it was all accurately in place, I was very successful.
It really emphasised to me how important it is not to look at all of the bits of timber and panic, because by following all of the steps, checking the plans regularly and taking it bit by bit it’s actually very easy to do. My new nickname is now ‘Becky the Builder’.

Just awaiting my next Cabin to construct! 🙂


Some superb work Becky! An excellent addition to the show site, and thank you for telling us how it all went, I’m glad you’re looking forward to your next installation!

You can start your next DIY adventure with the Daisy Log Cabin and the 28mm Side Annex available on our site.

To read more about our showsite installations, there are also ones on the Kennet Log Cabin and the Lennart Log Cabin installation blogs!