Log Cabin Offers

As we are preparing our 2018 catalogue, unfortunately we’re going to have to let go a few of our Log Cabins. So as a parting gift to some of our well known cabins, we are offering discounts!
See below for which cabins these include, this page will be updated as more offers come in, while stocks last!

In addition to these, we have recently added more offers around the site! Even with Log Cabins that will be staying in next years catalogue. You can start by looking in our Log Cabin page- these offers are available until the end of the year!

The Offers Available Are As Follows: 


The Gigamodern Log Cabin. 

The Gigamodern Log Cabin

Featuring a contemporary flat roof, storage shed and large open side shelter supported by two posts.

With flat roof, the 40mm Giga Modern Log Cabin is designed to imitate the wide, horizontal lines of the natural landscape. Perfect for adding a contemporary feel to any garden, this log cabin combines a storage shed and side shelter into one practical building.

The Gigamodern Log Cabin– Now available for £2,358!


The Supermodern Log Cabin.

The Supermodern Log Cabin

Flat roof Super Modern Log Cabin measuring 4.2 x 4.2m. With centrally positioned double doors flanked by two bottom-hung sash windows.

The Supermodern Log Cabin is a contemporary style Cabin with a sleek flat roof, centrally positioned double doors and high positioned windows. Made from 40mm Spruce timber, the supermodern is a stunning design that offers all year round use!

The Supermodern Log Cabin– Now available for £2185.50!


The Lisette Garden Office Studio.

The Lisette Log Cabin

The Lisette garden office studio measures 6.09 x 3.64m and features double glazing and double skin 19mm clad walls.

The Lisette is split into two, one side an enclosed office and the other open as a gazebo, this layout is perfect for a multifunctional garden building. Making this Log Cabin perfect to be used as: a summerhouse, garden office, art/music studio and more!

The Lisette Log Cabin– Now available for £3,819.85!


The Kajsa Modern Studio.

The Kajsa Modern Studio

A contemporary flat roof model in 19mm cladding, the Kaisja studio features a double door and two fixed windows. Dimensions are 2.72 x 2.01m.

This Modern Studio may be smaller in size, but doesn’t stop you from having crisp, clean lines from the Spruce Cladding. With the two fixed windows being adaptable for either side of the Cabin, this is a perfect Log Cabin for art/music studios.

The Kajsa Modern Studio– Now available for £1,268.90!


The Morten Log Cabin 

Morten Gazebo Log Cabin

A unique combination, the Morten features both a gazebo and shed annexe in one garden building. Measuring 3.5 x 5.0m and manufactured using 28m tongue and groove logs.

Who needs a separate Gazebo and Storage Shed when you have them both with the Morten? Inspired by the log cabin summerhouse and shed combinations, a full height partition creates a distinction between the two functions. It also offers flexibility with the Gazebo being able to be installed on either side of the Shed.

The Morten Log Cabin– Now available for £2,112.23!


The Amstelveen Modern Log Cabin.

Amstelveen Log Cabin

The Amstelveen 28mm Log Cabin measures overall at 5.82m x 2.48m- Including the incorporated canopy area.

A cabin that screams modern, the Amstelveen Log Cabin features a three measure length gazebo, with a 2.8m x 2.48m Cabin ideal for storage use or as a main summerhouse. The Amstelveen offers all the functionality and versatility of a conventional garden shed. Yet instead of panels, this building is constructed using interlocking 28mm Swedish pine logs.

The Amstelveen Modern Log Cabin– Now available for £1,410.19!


This page was last updated on the 20/2/2018

Keep an eye on this page or follow our social media pages to be notified when this list has been updated!

Daisy Log Cabin and Annexe Show Site Build

Hello everyone! So, while I (Meg) was out of the office for a week, the office still continued to work non stop! I came back to christmas decorations everywhere and a new showsite install! At first I was a bit disappointed the installation of the Daisy Log Cabin and 28mm Side Annex without me but one of our new/training sales assistants, Becky, told me she carried out some of the installation! Its an excellent way to learn about our products and how they are installed and she was even so kind enough to do her own write up about it for you guys!


Becky writes as follows: 

I’m new to the Tuin team and wanted to get hands on in the assembly of a log cabin to gain a better understanding of the process behind it, enabling myself to then be able to give personal and experienced advice to our customers as part of the Sales Team.

I would just like to point out that when I started I had absolutely zero DIY knowledge, skills or experience.
Furthermore assembling the cabin in the cold, rain and snow was also an experience, although it was a great opportunity to prove that bad weather never hinders the construction of a cabin, apart from my cold fingers!
Additionally, I can confidently say that building a cabin is not as hard as I first believed. Once you know what you’re doing, everything just slots together and before you know it it’s up!

On my third week of training I was given the opportunity to construct the roof on the Daisy and build the annexe on the side.
I put up my step ladder inside the cabin alongside one of our more experienced members of the team and together we fitted the roof of the Daisy. It was all tongue and groove so the pieces of timber literally just slotted together and then we nailed it in.
For starters I had never even held a hammer before this point let alone hammer roof nails in!

Roofboard Installation

Seems like the sun came out to give you the perfect selfie lighting- The roof behind you is looking great!

The further along the roof we went the space to put up the ladder was running out, it was time to get on top of the roof!
I was surprised at how sturdy it actually was because I was prepared to be falling through. So there I was at the end of November on my knees nailing on the roof boards. (Though because I was the one to put my name in to helping.. I did make sure to wrap up! It was just very cold haha)
In between multiple cups of coffee purely to warm up my insides, the roof was on.
It was a good opportunity to gain an understanding of the natural contraction and expansion of timber. But with a firm knock into place the roof looked pretty good if I do say myself.

Log Cabin Wall With Coffee

You look energised for your future tasks thanks to coffee!

Then came the shingles, what I perceived to be the next challenge but they in fact were also very easy to do! We started from the bottom of the roof, with the first set upside down to ensure coverage of the roof, and from then on worked our way up to the ridge.

I was then trusted enough to build the annexe by myself. Just me, the timber and the plans…

Firstly I made a level base with just three pieces of tanalised timber, I secured the annexe base using screws and then screwed the base into the side foundation beam of the Daisy Log Cabin; ensuring my base was 100% flat, level and square I was all set to go.
The starter half logs are simply put normal logs just cut in half so that they have a flat bottom, making it easy to sit on top of the foundation beams. You don’t have to, but I screwed these onto the foundation beams just for extra stability.

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From here on the rest of the logs just slotted on top of each other, about five logs up I stopped and lowered the door into place. I was clear to see that it was a good thing I didn’t go any higher as I wouldn’t have been able to lift the door up high enough to slide it into place. From here I continued to knock the rest of the logs on top of each other.
Then it came to the roof, which was pretty much exactly the same as the Daisy Log Cabin but thankfully not as high.

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I started from the front of the annexe and worked my way towards the back, The roof boards were also tongue and groove making it nice and easy for them to all slot together. I was nailing these in as I went two at the top, middle and bottom onto the purlins.

It’s not quite finished yet, just the shingles to go, but overall it was an enjoyable first experience of building a Log Cabin and Annexe. By continuously referring back to the plans and taking my time to make sure it was all accurately in place, I was very successful.
It really emphasised to me how important it is not to look at all of the bits of timber and panic, because by following all of the steps, checking the plans regularly and taking it bit by bit it’s actually very easy to do. My new nickname is now ‘Becky the Builder’.

Just awaiting my next Cabin to construct! 🙂


Some superb work Becky! An excellent addition to the show site, and thank you for telling us how it all went, I’m glad you’re looking forward to your next installation!

You can start your next DIY adventure with the Daisy Log Cabin and the 28mm Side Annex available on our site.

To read more about our showsite installations, there are also ones on the Kennet Log Cabin and the Lennart Log Cabin installation blogs!

Kennet Log Cabin Show Site Build

Hello everyone!

I know it hasn’t been long since the Lennart Show Site Build post.. But I had so much fun writing it I just couldnt wait much longer for the next one!

For those who have been to our showsite, you should remember the Stig Gazebo Log Cabin that was to your left. We’re giving this area an upgrade by replacing it with the Kennet Log Cabin! (It fitted well with our current base and decking) Unfortunately our apprentice sales assistant Andrew was needed in the office for this build, so its all up to our experienced installers Wayne and Phillip to install this beauty!

As I like to stress in my posts, organisation is very important to save time when building a Log Cabin, so I was more than willing to help organise and lay out the parts needed to start installing the Kennet.

Kennet Logs Organised

You’ll thank me later guys!

Now these two didn’t waste any time with installing this cabin, they headed off to an amazing start. Leaving no log behind! (even the small ones at the end of the gazebo that I found amusing).

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The next thing I knew the windows were fitted and the walls were getting taller than me!

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During this process of watching and keeping warm (thank you to the Lennart overhang for keeping me dry!) watching these guys became a trance.. Most of the time they didn’t even need to talk, one turns around and the other has a mallet ready for them, it was almost magical? If you have heard of a bromance, this is what I call the true sight of it.

Once the walls reached the last log the long 5m log was installed to the front of what will become the Gazebo, to keep this log up there is a post that’ll go to the other end to hold everything up (no pressure, support post). And this is where things turned technical… As you can see from the first image below, the decking is too high. This is because the decking was laid for the Stig Log Cabin, which is shorter in height.

There were spirit levels, a state of “Up a bit.. No, too high..!” and a chisel involved with resolving this problem, but not too long after the boys managed to do it! And now the gazebo will be level with the Log Cabin.

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The next step was installing the apex, which from writing the last post I was thoroughly educated on.

Kennet Cabin Apex

Apex.. Not Perspex!

Then the guys stopped for a break, which is great until.. It sunk in that all I have done during these stages was organise the logs, stand under the Lennart and take photos.. Which in their eyes, immediately made me the delegated coffee maker (I made the coffee a little weaker than usual so I wouldnt have to do another coffee run anytime soon hehe).

With coffee consumed and plans revised they were once more at it again- with no signs of stopping their speed anytime soon! Their next plan of action was the continuation of the Gazebo.. Now at the beginning of this I was confused by the cut of this corner section, they’re very slanted and I was concerned there would be issues with interlocking them.. But turns out I was wrong, just a few seconds longer than any other log to make sure it was all aligned!

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The purlins for the Kennet were ones I’ve never seen before, with these two circular ends on either side of the wall, the rest of the purlins were installed by interlocking one end to the wall, and screwing the other end to the circular pieces:

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Then, you guessed it.. The installation of the roof boards. This seemed to me like it would take longer to complete compared to the Lennart, so I left the guys in peace while they started the roof. In the meantime, I was writing the Lennart Show Build post.

With a few breaks away from the computer every now and then, I was sucessfully able to capture their progress on the roof boards:

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Now, the part where I learnt some things.. Number one, the smell of timber is very pleasant (no lie). Number two, the small nails in your general fixing kit are called Clout Nails.. And are for fixing the shingles to the roof boards! For the Kennet we decided to use the Brown Rounded Shingles from our shingle selection. In order to save time (and build the bromance) Wayne started securing the shingles while Philip finished up the rest of the roof boards, before helping finishing off the shingles.

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Unfortunately the guys ended up finishing the cabin in my absence for writing (“Let me know when you finish the roof and start the doorframe and overhand thingy” I said.. But noo”) But I did get Wayne to go through the process of how they finished the cabin off: They installed the door frame the same way they did with the Lennart, and installed the triangle overhang by placing it down from above and screwing it to secure it:

Log Cabin Doors And Overhang

And with those last two pieces to the puzzle, everything tied in together beautifully! All ready for treatment.

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Amazing work guys.. The Kennet Log Cabin was slightly more complex to install in my opinion (with the gazebo being a main aspect of the install), but definitely not impossible! I wonder what the next show site cabin will be..

To become thoroughly prepared for your Log Cabin Install, I highly recommend that you read Richard’s Fitting Advice Pages. You will also find more specific articles that may help when you look at the ‘Important Information’ tab on our Log Cabin pages.

If you haven’t read my first post about the Lennart Show Site Build Andrew and myself went though, you should certainly do so! As well as one written by our sales assistant in training, Becky helping with the Daisy Log Cabin and 28mm Storage Annexe!

For more posts like this, from a customer’s point of view check out our selection of Customer Pictorial Reviews.

 

Jenny Log Cabin Review

I’ve been so excited to share this with you guys since I’ve seen this come through in my email, so thank you to Mr T for sending this in and making a bright situation in such gloomy weather. Lets see how they turned their Jenny Log Cabin into a Cabin you couldnt miss from a mile away!


Mr T writes as follows: 

This is my overview and review and of my Jenny Log Cabin build, from Tuin.

I took a long time deliberating between different type of Cabin; sizes, profile, make and design and eventually settle for a Jenny Log Cabin from Tuin. It is 4.5 x 3.5m, which is slightly better in my opinion than the original 5.0×3.0m I was thinking of. The more square layout gives better usable space IMO.

I opted for the Jenny for the combination of design (I wanted a reverse apex design as it gives a better “frontage” yet doesn’t appear overly large), thickness of logs and Georgian-style doors and windows. It was going to be my garden gym, which probably mean it will be a summer playroom for me and the boys.

The seed started when we first move here just over 3 years ago. The garden was very overgrown with some very unkept Cherry Laurel that have overtaken almost a third of our garden. Hidden within this was a 6×10′ shed which has seen better days. We decided that it needed replacement. However, the shed stood on a concrete foundation that must have been created after the laurel have had many years to spread out. As such it was awkwardly positioned well out into the middle of our garden, to one side. Keeping a shed there will not do at all and we also wanted something a bit better – much better. Our search expanded to log cabins and that was when it all started.

Having chosen the Jenny, we needed to expand the concrete foundation as the existing foundation was too small. We toyed with the idea of just adding to the existing foundation but given its undesirable position, we ended up needing a new foundation entirely. A tradesman was called in for this and, given we would still need a shed of some sort, we wanted to have a single foundation that would cater for both the Jenny and a shed next to it – efficiency is the buzzword after all, especially since the tradesman will be doing this at the same time.

Anyway, back to the real story about Jenny. The package arrived well packaged delivered by a large articulated HGV straight from Holland with a forklift attached. It scared the neighbours silly when the forklift drove down our road with the package (5m long) across the road but luckily the forklift has some amazing manoeuvrability and the package was neatly deposited on our drive. It did stay there for a couple of weeks untouched as I needed to ensure the space was ready to receive it.

The Packaged Jenny Log Cabin

When there was finally a good weekend-weather window the job begins. On unpacking and taking inventory, there were quite a few “additional” planks which were used to securely package the items. However, this also makes it quite a challenge to determine which are originals and which are packing planks.

As usual, some of the wall log pieces were a bit warped but the video from Turin reassured me that this is quite normal as there are techniques to deal with warped wall planks since they interlock.

There were also a couple of very long (5m) square planks which, for whatever reasons, were extremely warped but at the time I thought little of them thinking there will no doubt be ways to deal with them. These were in fact the eave slats for the roof (used to stiffen the edge of the roof board and provide a surface to nail the fascia covering) as I later discovered and turns out to be a much bigger problem than I anticipated

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So first step was to lay the foundation beams. I bought the recycled plastic foundation beams as these would never rot. Getting these cut to the right size and angle was actually quite a challenge as they are just slightly too big for my mitre block. In addition, as they only comes in 3m length I had to join them for all 4 walls – well 3 actually as the front has the gap for the door anyway. Given the importance of getting the foundation absolutely squared, this was IMO the most critical step in the entire build. With the unpacking/checking and moving the logs into the garden ready for the build, setting the foundation layer took me into the following day. In fact, it took me almost another 2 hours the next day before I was happy to proceed. I also had the help of my lovely wife to check the squareness of the base layer as once it started going up, you don’t want to undo it!

Log Cabin Base

Before I started the build, I also laid down a layer of DPM (plastic membrane used to prevent rising damp). I know the advice was only to lay it under the foundation pieces and then, once the build is completed and the floor is ready to be laid, to add the floor covering at that stage since it could get punctured during the build. To be honest, the DPM did get a bit battered with all the foot traffic but they stayed intact. In any case they were cheap enough that I bought twice the required amount which allows me to have a second layer once I am ready to install the floor. With 2 layers of DPM I think I am pretty protected from rising damp!

Jenny Cabin Installation With DPM

Once the foundation layer is in place, the walls go up surprisingly quickly. You do need a good (heavy) rubber mallet for this which was something I found invaluable. I bought a 32oz (about 1kg) white rubber mallet just in case my (smaller) black one would leave marks but was very glad for the heavier mallet, which really help to hammer the logs into place. The few pieces that were warped were helped into place using a couple of good, strong Irwin Quick Grip XP clamps. The door frames (which needed to be put together from the 4 separate pieces) goes in after 5/6 layers of wall logs. BTW, be careful when putting together the door frame especially the stainless metal covering the bottom piece – it is very sharp and will easily slice your fingers. Don’t ask how I know.

The windows go in once you get up to the right level. Be sure to get the window frames down squarely and adequately as if not, you may find later that the first full length log will not fit. It had me scratching head for quite some time before I figured this out.

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Once the final wall logs are in place, it is time to fit the apex logs. At first, I was worried that it would be in one piece (which can be quite heavy) as you will need to raise it quite high. However, it comes in normal, log size pieces which interlocks into each other via T&G so quite easy to install in the end. Installing the long roof purlins fixes the apexes in place and make the whole structure very stable. Next step is installing the roof boards!

Jenny Roof Purlins

Installing the roof was the most onerous job in my build. The fact that the cabin is sited close to the edge of our property and under the existing hedging conifers (which I wanted to keep as much as possible) means that one half of the roof had to be installed under the conifers. Installing the roof boards was actually not so hard as you can do this from inside the cabin using a step ladder/platform, but the roof shingles was an entirely different challenge. Also, because of the proximity of the conifer I ended up having to jigsaw off about 5cm along the entire length of the roof once it was already in place – due to the proximity of one of the conifer tree.

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Once the roof boards are on, it was time to install the shingles. These came free with the cabin and we got the rectangular one. We would have preferred the hexagonal shingles but as it is free, one cannot complain. This took quite some time to complete especially the half that is under the conifers. I had to crawl along the roof under the conifers with very little headroom whilst measuring, cutting and nailing the shingles in place. It was the hardest part of the build but also a tremendous sense of achievement once completed. I have to admit the shingles really finish off the cabin in fine style.

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We also bought the floor kit with the cabin, since this finishes off the cabin nicely. The thought of using OSB boards after the personal effort and attention of the build makes me cringes. As the floor is inside, there was no real rush to do this but unfortunately, there were a couple of weekends of heavy rain so exterior work has to wait. The floor boards were installed in a similar fashion to the roof boards (in fact, I think they are the same except for the numerous finger joints that exist with the floor boards) but here you have to cut all the boards at exactly the right place in order to ensure both pieces can be supported by a floor joists at the joint. I used plenty of nails and luckily there were plenty supplied.

I was really keen to ensure the exterior of the cabin is protected ASAP. For this we got Sickens Rubal Saturn Plus in a specially mixed colour, with complimentary shade for the door and windows. These are the “thickest” protectant we could found which is recommended by Tuin. We also got the Rubal Undercoat to make sure the final colour is nice and uniform and to give it 3 coats in total – I don’t intend to have to repeat this in the future and the attention and details will only be justifiable when the whole thing is “nice & new”. These paints were really good – nice and thick with strong opacity but boy, they do take some effort. Luckily, there were quite a few days of good sunshine, but I had to take extra days off work just to make sure the painting was completed.

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With everything completed, it was time to deal with the interior. We wanted to keep the natural wood look inside but thought it best that the floor is protected. Unfortunately, there doesn’t seem to be clear equivalent of the Sickens Rubal, so we ended up with Tuin’s own recommended Carefree Protectant Timber Treatment. We don’t need that much but as you have to order 2 tins, we thought that if they are anywhere as good as claimed, we would be more than happy to use them for our garden furniture as well. Applying the Wood Protectant to the floor was very quick and the Protectant goes on extremely easily – almost like painting on water in fact. Once we have applied one coat of the Wood Protectant we apply another, normal coat of wood varnish to reduce wear. This also gives it a slightly darker shade, which is actually quite nice.

Overall, I am very pleased with the quality of the Jenny Log Cabin and the service from Tuin. I would definitely recommend Tuin for their quality cabins which are quite reasonable price-wise. The free shingles, if you get them, is a no-brainier and really completes your build.

A few thoughts and tips from my experience:

  1. Use some good, large brushes when applying the protectant to the exterior. There is so much surface that you will be glad to have a decent brush which can cover the area quickly.
  2. Be careful when installing the Georgian door & window frames. The frames are very simple wood strips which you have to nail to the door/windows. They are not bespoke made so can leave some doubts as to how they fit. In addition, they are not really long enough thus leaving little space to put the nail. In fact, I cracked both my window panes as the nail hits the glazing. With hindsight I now understand why so many of the builds do not have these frames installed (even on Tuin’s own website).
  3. I would recommend getting the best wood protectant you can find. The amount of work required to do this will outweigh any cost considerations and you will regret using cheap stuff (or just end up doing a sloppy job).
  4. Get a decent rubber mallet (ideally white so that it doesn’t leave marks).
  5. Make sure you have a good set of strong quick grip clamps as you will need these when installing warped logs or the roofing eave slats. They are also an extra pair of hands which you will find invaluable at times.
  6. Take your time with the roof shingles (if you are using them). They take some time to install but the quality and appearance of a well laid roof shingles really add the cherry to the cake.
  7. With the cost of the cabin and effort required to build, I would strongly recommend getting at least 2 layers of DPM so that the interior and floor are protected from any rising damp. They are also not expensive.
  8. You will most likely need an impact driver to install the first layer of logs onto the foundations beams. If not be prepared for some cursing and sore hands.

If you do decide to go for one of these log cabin, be prepared for some real hands-on action and I hope the above write-up would provide some assurance. I am a reasonable DIYer but nothing in this build can be considered difficult. The initial start is the most anxious part but once you are on your way, it is really not that difficult – certainly within the capability of most competent DIYers. The satisfaction and sense of pride after its completion, however, will be there to enjoy for decades thereafter. Good luck with your build.

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Thank you to Mr T for such a lengthy and informative review! As for some of your confusion that you guys may have with the window and door frames- They are for decoration purposes and aren’t very thick in terms of the timber. For the Georgian look you will have to be careful with installing them, some people tend to opt out for them as they don’t like the look- But they are featured on some of our showsite buildings!

Why not look into the Jenny Log Cabin for your unique garden canvas?

For more in depth customer reviews such as Mr T’s, browse through our Pictorial Customer Reviews.

Julia Log Cabin Review

It always brings me joy when I see a review in my emails. So I’d like to say thank you to Mr H for sending in his review on his Julia Log Cabin. In this he talks about how he made his Log Cabin multifunctional for both himself and his wife- with high quality images!


Mr H writes as follows: 

The fun started with the delivery. We live in a small town in mid-Suffolk, the sort of place that big lorries only get through with a police escort, so God knows where the driver parked his truck. I wish I’d been there to see it, but the first I knew of the actual delivery was when I came home about mid-day the day before the scheduled delivery, to find the driver trying to find me. Apparently there’d been lots of attempts to contact me to advise of the early delivery, but since I’d been away and I don’t use a mobile phone, he was at a loss as to what to do.

Fortunately he didn’t give up, and we met half way between our house and the low bridge where he was stuck with his fork-lift. A lot of beard-tugging and tea-drinking followed, and it finally became clear that the only way he was going to get the fork-lift under the 9ft railway bridge was to offload the shingles and the extra windows, which were on top of the 5m-wide load. Even at this stage it was a miracle he’d got that far, having crabbed sideways with his fork-lift to get past the parked cars on the narrow approach road.

For the scheduled delivery I had intended to politely ask the residents to move their cars for the purpose, so that saved me a grovel or two. Lightening the load (nearly a ton of wood, plus what felt like half a ton of shingles) meant the business end of the fork-lift could be moved out and forward of the wheels without overbalancing the whole lot. As the forks thus came down about 2ft, it looked like the truck would finally clear the bridge. Not quite, but he found a spot in the middle of the road that the forks just cleared by about 2cm, and the subsequent 72-point turn took him about 20 minutes. He got a round of applause from the guys in the garage on the corner, and another cup of tea.

Reused Brick Base

The previous, unfortunately small base

We’d had a greenhouse on the site where the log cabin was to go, but the single brick course that was the greenhouse’s foundation was just enough inches out from the perfect size to be utterly useless (confirmed by Tuin’s very helpful Customer Service staff). Taking the bricks down left a floor of Indian sandstone slabs that, by themselves, were not level enough for the log cabin, so I concreted a 8″ wide foundation directly onto the sandstone. I was going to concrete in the whole area, until I worked out how much 15sq yards of concrete were going to cost, even at three inches deep!

Getting that down and level was perhaps the most difficult bit of the whole build, but absolutely essential, as Tuin’s site repeatedly emphasises. Getting the joists level was a bit of a nightmare, as the Indian sandstone had lumps and bumps all over the place: I took to chiselling off the worst of the unevenness. The floor was then built up with 70mm insulation between the joists (in an eccentric pattern due to the sandstone), with a damp-proof membrane underneath, 11mm chipboard on top of the joists, and hard-wearing wood laminate ‘planks’ on top (half price at Wickes) with standard underlay.

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The cabin went up so quickly I forgot to take many pictures of it. Everything fitted beautifully, and you could almost dispense with the instructions. But then the Julia is an oblong ‘box’ with no complex corners, so I wouldn’t recommend losing the instructions when dealing with a more complicated build. I didn’t have the space available to lay all the pieces out for identification and to make the build easier, but it didn’t matter – it was very easy anyway.

However, I still made a few mistakes. Nothing to do with Tuin, but entirely due to my own lack of forethought about the interior fittings. The cabin was to be a workshop and a storage area for my photographic prints, and a quiet spot (ie. when I’m not in it) for my wife to paint and draw.

Julia Interior

It all ties in wonderfully, like it was meant to be!

But when I moved my work-bench in, and subsequently installed the worktops around two sides of the cabin, the beautiful picture window at the end of the cabin, which overlooks the river at the bottom of our garden and the farm beyond, was an inch too low. It opens OK, but there’s a gap around the frame (see pics). I’d forgotten to check the height of the bench before cutting the hole for the window.

I could in theory take it out and extend the window’s cavity upwards, or cut the worktop to fit around the window frame, but mentally the build is ‘finished’ now so I won’t be doing that. Besides, I’d never be able to cut the worktop straight enough, and that would look worse. But nobody notices my mistake, they’re too busy admiring the rest of the cabin!

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Incidentally, I chose a Tuin log cabin – not that I wouldn’t have chosen a Tuin for other reasons as well – because they are one of the very few, available at a sensible price and beautifully constructed, that has doors that open on the end wall, and not in the middle of the longer side. That ‘normal’ configuration was impossible for us, as we have the neighbour’s wall down one long side, and a substantial raised flower bed, with a tree in it, down the other. Not to put too fine a point on it, it was a relief to find the Tuin site and to find, among its hundreds of cabin configurations, exactly what we wanted. And because of that versatility, I’ve now lost my Tuin catalogue to some London friends who now also want a Tuin cabin…

My other mistake, similar to the first, was to cut the holes for the air vents without considering the fact that cupboards were going to be in the way of the lower one. So I now need to cut out another air vent, somewhere where it can breathe properly.

There was enough 40mm wood left over to build a small wood store down the side of the cabin, and more than enough shingles left to roof it over as well. Speaking of the shingles, as one who’s never put a roof on before (or built a log cabin for that matter), the instructions here were little confusing: doing the bulk of the roof was straightforward (I used Tuin’s Richard’s idea of inverting the first row, as it looks so much neater), but cocked up on the bit at the top (I forget what it’s called, the ridge at the top…). Half way along I realised I had the shingles (by now cut into singles) the wrong way round. Perhaps, again in my haste (it was starting to rain) I’d overlooked some key part of the instructions here, but it would pay to get that right first time.

Log Wood Store

A great idea to recycle left over timber!

And I didn’t quite know how to deal with the ends of the roof, where the shingles meet fresh air. I didn’t recall seeing any instructions about that, so in the end I cut off two inches of laid shingles along a straight-edge, and screwed onto the roof the remaining pieces of wood, butted up against the shingles. It looks neat, so I suppose it’ll be OK.

IKO Shingles on the Cabin Roof

All in all, I’m so chuffed that it looks great, will outlast me, and is an impressive addition to our ‘real estate’. We’ve yet to paint it and to add the interior electrics and the exterior guttering. Speaking of the paint, Brewers now recommend an acrylic paint by Bedec called Barn Paint, which needs no priming and ‘probably’ just two coats for full protection. However, the available colours are very limited, so my wife has come up with a cunning plan: a mix of the Forest Green Barn Paint plus about three other colours from the Barn Paint catalogue (free in sample sizes) to make the sage green that she wanted. That was the deal: I get the cabin, she chooses the colour.

I have been told that I am not to spend all my days in the cabin. We’ll see about that.

The Finished Install of the Julia Log Cabin

The roofing looks great- it all does in my opinion!


The Julia Log Cabin turned out to be perfect for the multipurpose work room! I think Mr & Mrs H did an amazing job with installing this- we don’t lie when we say installation can be quick! Thank you for sending this in, we hope you enjoy your Log Cabin and your gift for many years to come!

Other customer reviews ranging from installation to finishing touches can be here here at: Pictorial Tuin Reviews.

Justine Log Cabin Review- Part 2

Not too long ago we received a nicely detailed review/installation overview of Mr E’s Justine Log Cabin. And to our delight we found another email from him with a part two! This one goes in-depth on their finishing touches to their cabin.


Mr E writes as follows: 

After the build comes the finish and protection. This again can be time-consuming but is very visible so a good job is vital. The cleverer amongst you will have planned to apply protection to the outside of your cabin before the construction, we didn’t.

We had ideas, as I mentioned earlier we thought we might try Shou Sugi Ban, this would have meant turning a propane burner on the outside surfaces (eek!), scorching the wood then painting linseed oil on, this is a Japanese method of wood preservation and gives a long-lasting finish but definitely needs a lot of thought (courage!) and must be done before construction.

With this in mind we must be happy with a dark colour, we hoped this would make the cabin less conspicuous as it is visible from the lane but we would use a lighter colour for contrast on the windows, doors and facias. After looking at several company websites including those recommended by Tuin and getting some sample colours (very few offer samples – strange) we settled on Osmo natural oil wood treatment from Germany, it promised simple application, got some good reviews and we liked their Quartz Grey 907 as the primary colour.

Osmo recommend two coats applied thinly, that lets the wood grain show through and recoating is simple, no prep just paint over. The product is economical to use and does go a long way, I used a 2.5L of the 907 Quartz Grey, giving the front and sides three coats (for a more solid colour) and so far one coat on the back (we have nesting birds in the back hedge and I’m trying not to disturb them) but I have enough left for a second coat. The contrast colour is 903 Basalt Grey and a 750ml can give everything two coats with a bit left over for touch ups. Obviously, it’s too early to tell on longevity but I’m very happy with our choice.

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The deck area has been treated with two coats of decking oil as has the faces of the timber frame and I have put up some black 76mm guttering which will discharge into a water butt.

The interior floor has been treated to 3 coats of Bona Mega clear satin varnish, this is a water based product and is quick and easy to apply and dries rapidly. As the garage contents must go in soon, the interior walls are not yet treated or painted, but that and the electrics hook up can wait until the garage extension is finished.

The void space below the deck is a useful log store at the front (I have put an angled liner under the deck to stop water dripping through the gaps) and the space below the cabin has a plastic sheet pinned down to stop weeds and damp and I have put in a basic rack using the pallet off cuts so that long timber and our surf boards can be stored in relative shelter.

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What I thought was the last job has been to construct some steps up to the deck using lots of offcuts from the project – bits of frame posts, the palate, roof boards and fascia boards topped off with the last of the deck boards.

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My wife now wants a small lean to shed on the back for ready use garden tools so more work is promised!
I hope this is of some use to prospective builders, it has been really fun, though hard work at times and I hear that a friend in Wales that is looking to buy a cabin so Micky and I might have to get our mallets out again.

The Justine Cabin Finished For Now

Looking Stunning Mr E!

 


Its always exciting to hear we might have another part to the installation story. Your Justine is looking stunning Mr E, and we love how you optimise space and left over resources! We look forward to hearing from you again!

Part 1 of Mr E’s Justine Log Cabin Review.

For other customer experiences, builds and ideas find them here: Pictorial Tuin Reviews.

Lauren Clockhouse Log Cabin Review

One of our customers was very generous in sending a review of their Lauren Clock House Log Cabin (previously known as the Special Ben), with plenty of images to show you guys the installation progress! We do love receiving images here at Tuin, so thank you Mr F for sending this to us!


Mr F writes as follows:

We were both extremely impressed with the quality of the material and the thought and precision that had gone into the preparation of the kit of parts.

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The 1st of 3 packages arrives, expertly manoeuvred by Barry, the truck driver. Each load was 20ft long and weighed about 1.7tons. By the second image there was a total of 5 tons of shed. Due to a lack of planning on my part they were going to remain unwrapped for about 2 weeks as the ground work was completed.

Work starts on the base about 08.00hrs. Quite a bit of soil had to be removed to
give us a level area. A load of scalping is delivered to the pit, in all, 12 tons was used to form a base for the cement.

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Kharn, the builder, with his whacker plate consolidates the scalping and the
shuttering is leveled. We finished at 20.30hrs – a long day but the pressure was on as we had booked the ready mix lorry for 08.00hrs the next morning.

Leveled Out Shuttering

Impressive work in just one day Kharn!

Day 2 at 07.55hrs, 13 tons of cement arrives… A small dumper truck was used to bring the cement to the site and frantic tamping continued for over 2 hours until all appeared level – very hard work!

A couple of days later and with the concrete hardened the rear bank was ‘landscaped’ and a trench for gravel dug at the base.

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Monday, Day 1 of construction at about 08.00hrs. The lower beams had been treated the day before and the black items are lengths of the plastic base material. The walls progressed nicely and the plastic base strips have just been cut to fit and slid under the lower logs. Note the log which will eventually be fitted above the door, has been temporarily positioned to keep things square despite the gap in the front wall.

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How the joints between the front and rear wall and the middle wall were to be made was a mystery to us but the long logs with vertical holes near the joints gave us a clue and answered the question, ‘what were the square pegs for?’.

The square pegs or ‘wall dowels’ had their corners and ends rounded slightly which still resulted in a satisfying tight fit but with less chance of splitting the logs. The 3 on the left have been treated with a belt sander. About 1 minute per peg and about 60 pegs in total. A pencil mark at the halfway point was useful when banging in.

Wall Dowels

Don’t worry Mr F, these can confuse most people!

About 12 hours after we started and we realise that it’s quite a big Log Cabin!

Installed Walls

The Lauren Clockhouse Log Cabin is one of our longest products!

Day 2 and the roof is progressing well. For the first 2 days of construction there were 3 of us working with lots of carrying from storage area to site and quite a bit of head scratching as we searched for various specific logs. Three pairs of hands were useful as we positioned and fixed the heavy purling.

A start is made nailing the tongue & groove roof boards into position. Much later and all of the boards are fixed. Rain was expected so we protected the roof. Probably no need to but it made us feel better.

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Day 3 was mainly spent nailing floor boards. The nail gun chose a bad time to fail and resulted in much manual hammering. Day 4 was mainly spent fixing shingles to the rear. A slow job but looked good when done. Ladders R Us.

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Day 5, the small gable comes in 3 pieces which we screwed together at ground level then lifted into position. Inevitably, it complicated the fixing of shingles on the front and it was quite late on the Friday before we finished. On days 4 & 5, some time was spent hiding from the heavy showers which slowed us down a little.

We used some heavier timber to trim the base of the roof to provide a substantial mount for guttering. Note the notches required to fit it around the left, right and middle wall. With a bit more thought I could have cut the timber longitudinally to a better shape for the gutter brackets but now I’ll have to custom make a mounting for each bracket.

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End of day 5. It looks like the finished product but still needs a lot of detail work and much brushwork. The most important pieces of paper. A list of contents annotated by me with the log positions and the detailed diagrams showing each log position.

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Happiness is 3 empty pallets. Progress would have been quicker if I were able to unpack and lay out in piles all the various bits of timber. The sheer quantity of wood (and the animals in the field) precluded that, so quite some time was spent rummaging for specific pieces as required. The timber had been cut very accurately and we found that the lengths on the plan, accurate to the millimeter, were very useful in identifying the required log.

Empty Palettes

True happiness indeed!

As garden buildings go, this was a big project and I wasn’t too surprised that the main build took 5 days. Kharn, a professional builder, and I were very impressed with the quality of the material and the accuracy with which it had been prepared. The joints were well thought out and accurately milled although we were dealing with significant lumps of timber and found a club hammer, with protective wood, more useful than a mallet! Even a sledge hammer was found a use in squaring-up the part built walls. Apart from the nails in the floor and roof boards, and the wall dowels, virtually no other fixings were used. The wall logs and purlins stay in position because of the clever joints while the entire building sits steady on its base because of its weight. The packing had been very well done and, as far as I am aware, no parts were missing. Indeed, the supply of plain wood parts seemed generous. Although
there were 450kg of shingles we were a little concerned that we would run out. With 378 shingles we finished the roof with 2 remaining – very well judged by the manufactures.

Overall, I’m a very happy customer and, more importantly, so is my wife! An outstanding product at a bargain price. As the Americans would say, ‘A lot of bang for your buck’. Many thanks for the excellent service and the experience of the build has got my builder friend thinking of buying a smaller version for himself. I hope to have the staining and guttering done soon and will send you a picture of the finished item.


Thank you again Mr F for a detailed and informative overview of your installation process for the Lauren Clockhouse Log Cabin. It looks great and we can’t wait to see your pictures for when it’s completely finished! I hope you and your wife enjoy your log cabin!

Other customer experiences, build articles and tips can be found at: Pictorial Tuin Reviews.