The Bohemian Blue Hut

Hello everyone –

Today I’m going to be talking about some customers that I’ve been keeping an eye on for a while, and they are @the_bohemian_blue_hut on Instagram, these customers have done an amazing transformation of our Shepherds Hut 600 into a true bohemian fantasy.

Bohemian Style Shepherds Hut

Invitingly cosy!

How did they do it? Well, it all starts with an order and a delivery:

Shepherd Hut Delivery

From getting the delivery and being ready to install your cabin/shepherds hut, we always recommend to start looking at the plans and identifying the parts needed throughout. As shown below, all of the parts were laid out for the wheel frame for the hut, then the floor joists and floor were laid down. By the next picture you can see how fast it can be to install one of our Shepherds Huts, the paneled design allows you to position the windows how and where you want them in a timely manner.

From walls to roofing, the process seems to flow one step into another – These customers also added insulation in the wall panels. We recommend using 35mm – 45mm Celotex (or similar) insulation in the walls and rockwool in the roof, allowing you to increase the heat capacity and usage possibilities of the Shepherds Hut.

Shepherds Hut 600 Install

Everyone involved seems to be hard at work with installing this 600cm Shepherds Hut

Our Shepherd Huts were made with insulation in mind, with the supports of each panel sticking out some, you now have the ideal size for getting your insulation even. To hide the insulation in the walls you can then essentially ‘twin skin’ the shepherds hut, either by using plywood or 8mm pine cladding to build a new wall.

From this point is where the true transformation takes its shape. These customers created picture frame-esque framing to create a vintage style which when painted, really makes the hard work paid off- Making the walls appear naturally vintage. Two colours of paint were used for the interior, using a lighter colour of blue as the base they then painted over with a rich blue shade. The effect from using chalk paint allowed these customers to achieve a naturally weathered look, and I can’t believe I never thought of that myself!

The exterior of the Shepherds Hut was painted using a green exterior paint, giving the exterior a natural look, suitable to suit the surrounding lake and woodlands. (Which in itself, is the perfect setting for this building).

Shepherds Hut 600 Interior

The contrast from the natural exterior to the bright and bold interior, to give your guests a little surprise.

The Bohemian style has certainly made a comeback in the recent years, and I’m personally not mad about it – The modern Bohemian style consists of a few main points: Colour, Contrast and Pattern. Along with the vintage theme, these customers used a bright blue as the base for their hut, then they created their contrast by using colours ranging from pink, red to orange for their accessories.

Some elements of this project just oozes vintage luxury, from the hardwood sink cabinet and tables, the board games all the way to the lighting, each piece was chosen with the theme in mind. I also love the touch of Moroccan styling with the gold patterned curtain frame- Afterall, Moroccan aesthetics were highly praised for their luxe bohemian look in the mid 2000’s.

Did I mention that these customers also added plumbing and sewage access to this hut, allowing them to make a dainty, but certainly usable bathroom.

Shepherds Hut Interior Design

All pieces for the interior design was chosen with the primary colour of blue in mind.

What we now see is a transformed Shepherds Hut with a distinctive theme- A perfect theme for extra accommodation, for those few nights away when you just want to be closer to nature and to yourself. As of last week, these customers opened up their Shepherds Hut for guest bookings on Airbnb, and with a cosy bed like this, I think these guys will do well with their future of hosting.

Bohemian Style Shepherd Hut

They even managed to introduce the patten element of Bohemian style with the bedding.

I know for sure that I’m starting to feel creative again after looking through this transformation, are you?

If your brain is budding with ideas on a transformation, you can look into using the Shepherds Hut 600cm as the base for your project.

Or if you worry that 6m won’t be enough space for your ideas – We have recently added an 8m version of our Gypsy Wagon.

Shepherd Hut Review

One of our customers, James from East Sussex, has been very generous in sending us his review of the Shepherd Hut Gypsy styled caravan and his process of installing them from start to finish- with plenty of pictures!


James writes as follows: 

I ordered two Shepherd’s Huts before Christmas to take advantage of the generous discount. They were delivered in the first week in January. The delivery driver was superb and, though it was difficult and time-consuming, he managed to get both into one of our barns.

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We debated where to undertake construction and in the end decided that it would be best right by the house, which involved some nice exercise to stroll up and down the drive when stuff was needed.

The kits were extremely well packed and there was no need to use additional tarpaulin or covering. They have sat there in the barn until today when I opened the first one. I used my car to haul the heavy metal chassis and wheels, nuts, bolts and other hardware up to the build area. There is one thing we did: I read a review about the axle being tube which broke when the hut was moved a short distance. We decided to get a blacksmith to beef up that component, just in case, so the tube was cut off and solid steel bar was welded in its place for each axle.

Axle Tube Modifications

Since all the metal work was on top of the kit, I kind of thought that the contents of the delivery would be packed in the order you need them. But that isn’t the case and it’s not a problem. So, after looking at the drawings and instructions and much head scratching, we opened up the delivery and had another round of head scratching.

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Day 1:

Our aim for today – I am building this with my friend who is a great deal more handy and adept than I am – was to get the base done. We started at 10.00am and, unusually for me, we carefully studied the manual/building plans and decided we would just go at it a page at a time. So, first order of business was to build the chassis. The metal bit was easy and that was the starting point and first job to do. All we had to do was lay out the metal work roughly where we wanted to build the hut.

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It was at this point that we realised we would need various lengths of timber from the kit and, when I opened it, I noticed that a lot of them were right down the bottom of the pallet! So, we would have to take everything off the pallet and stack it in vertical piles. That took a little while as we looked at various components and discussed them and where they would fit into the overall thing. I was very surprised to see that the panels that had windows actually had the glass in! OK, if you want to double glaze your hut you need to change that but it says something for the quality of the packaging and the way things are shipped that all the glass is in first class condition – not a scratch or crack anywhere on it.

Looking at the build instructions, and the separate parts list, the various lengths of timber, some of which look the same length, I had hoped would be numbered to correspond with their number in the parts list. They aren’t. It’s not a problem – but you just need to be careful to make sure you use a tape measure to check the sizes to correctly identify the various components.

For instance, you might just be able to make out below that to join the two chassis units, you need to make up a joist which uses one 2, one 2a and a 2b. 2a and 2b are not dissimilar in size but if you make that mistake – we did – you end up with a joist that is either too short by a few inches or too long by the same amount.

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The first task that involves wood is to make two items that bolt onto the metal work. We did these on the ground and then fitted them.

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A point on the metal chassis. We did a bit of head scratching because what we had in front of us didn’t match the drawing. It was obvious that this assembly had been beefed up with two additional bolts but that isn’t reflected in the drawing. Sill, you would want to be fairly uptight to worry about it and I am certain that the additional metal and bolts are an improvement.

Metal Chassis Closeup

Getting on with the frame, we built the first two long joists (the 2 + 2a + 2b) that bolt to the metal frames on the ground. Then it was just a case of positioning them accurately, drilling holes and bolting to the metal. This fixes the length of the unit – and it’s big!

From here, you need to assemble the rest of the joists – another five. As mentioned, each one is made of three pieces of different length timber. There was a whole lot of head scratching trying to get the right ones together. Basically, we put all the possible pieces on the part-built base, which is a great work bench, and then worked out what went with what. You just need to take your time and things click into place.

Underlining the point that the Shepherd Hut base is a very handy workbench at exactly the right height, in the image you can see James making up one of the three-component joists.

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The Tuin hut is a quality item and as we were working we were having some thoughts about making sure it lasts. The base we are working on, the underside won’t show, unless someone crawls underneath. The wood is untreated and, as it goes through its life, while rain can’t get under there, dew and damp, over time, could. So we decided that we would not fix any of the joists for the moment. That’s because I am going out tomorrow to get some really good wood preservative for everything we have made so far before it is fixed – it’s a lot easier brushing on preservative when I can turn the joist over to get all sides, rather than crawling around under the base. Also, I am going to apply a coat of preservative to the underside of the floorboards – the ones that will be open to mist and moisture from beneath. So this is as far as we got on Day 1 – all the joists are ready to be screwed down but they will get a coat of preservative before that happens.

In terms of time, what you see above is not a day’s work – it took four hours work for two guys from start to finish, and that included a fair bit of time at the beginning getting familiar with the kit, instructions, components and how to read the drawings and specs, looking at parts and figuring things out. Most of all, we want to enjoy this build so we are not rushed. Tomorrow is preserving day. At this stage we are delighted with everything and though we have had the offer of whatever support and advice from Richard at Tuin, we haven’t felt the need to avail ourselves of it.

Day 2: 

Day 2 is a misnomer. On Day 2, as mentioned above, I treated everything with a preservative/sealant against moisture and that included the floor joists and all the underside of all the floorboards. I stacked the made-up joists on the axles and used the hut base to paint on the preservative to the floorboards and then I left them there and covered the lot with the tarpaulin.

We cleared the deck and positioned the five joists. It was at this stage that we discovered a length discrepancy in two of them – one was a bit short while the other was a few inches too long. Clearly we had made a mistake and we figured out we had used the wrong three components, as indeed we had. It didn’t take long to figure out where we made the mistake and we switched over components. However, it underlines that you need to take your time and make sure you identify all the components and put a pencil mark on them so that in the heat of constructing things, you don’t mistake similar sized and shaped lengths.

Things are still a bit slow at this stage, as compared with later but you need to just take your time. The joists have to be positioned accurately and we did that and clamped them in position while we screwed on the metal brackets. There’s 20 of them so, even with two of us, it still took time. I guess, from unwrapping things, getting the joists positioned and putting the brackets in – with a stop for a bacon sarnie and a tea – it took us nearly three hours to get everything ready. After that, things began to speed up in terms of seeing real change and progress. I think it only took us about half an hour or so to screw the floorboards to the joists and suddenly we had a platform and we could look at putting up the wall panels.

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We decided to offset the side windows, looking over the timestamps of the images I was able to work out that it took just a few minutes over one hour to get from the first image… To the last one.

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It is definitely a two-man job but not a difficult one. Up goes a panel and while one holds it in place and pushed tight against the base and its neighbour panel, the other then screws it bottom and sides to the next panel.

The next task, attaching the curved roof timbers, was a slower job because they are attached at each side with small metal brackets using fiddly little screws plus being up a ladder. But from start to finish, and in all of this construction work we were not in a hurry or rushing things, it took over an hour to fit all of the curved roof timbers and the two end sections.

So below is where we got to by 4.00pm when we decided to call it a day. Tomorrow we need to complete the roof pieces to cover the porch area, and then apply the tongue and groove roof boards.

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After James headed off and I did a few chores, I decided it would be pleasant and relaxing to do at least one side with the primer undercoat I had bought from Screwfix that comes very highly recommended. It’s a job that needs doing, so why not get a bit of it done. And, in the way of these things, a couple of hours later and I had done the whole lot.

And so, construction Day 3 looms and the forecast is for it to be very hot and sunny all day.

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Day 3: 

Today’s forecast was for the hottest day of the year so far and they didn’t get it wrong. It was in the 70s with not a cloud in the sky. I was up early and while having my first coffee of the day, I tried a patch of the blue I have selected for the exterior to check the colour. It will need another coat but I like the light blue.

Paint Test

I was probably jumping the gun last night by priming/undercoating the build so far because we added on the porch today which will need to be primed. But what I have done certainly wasn’t a waste of time. We started work before 9.00am and we used the van to move up all of the tongue and groove roofing boards – there are three sizes that make up a length. As we looked at things, we discovered a slight error in that one of the roof beams was not in the right place – we were about 5cms out, so we did a bit of remedial work to get that set up perfectly. Then we built the porch which went together well. We had some head scratching because we hadn’t noticed that we needed a little batten up top on the outside of the porch upright at each side, but once we realised that, it didn’t take long to find the two bits of board and get everything properly lined up ready to start work on the roof boards.

A word of caution on those curved roof beams. They are held in place by a little bracket which you can see in the photo below. It stands slightly proud – and we couldn’t see a way of avoiding that – which causes some fun and games when you try to put a roof board on top of it. We worked out a way – bash down the metal edge that is protruding and leave the board above loose while you fit the final board, then nail them both down. But it would be good if a nick could be taken off that bracket in manufacture – or maybe we should have positioned it further inward so it didn’t stand proud, but that doesn’t look right as you can see from the second shot.

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From the time stamp on the photo, I can see that we started work on boarding the roof at 12.00. It was really hot so it was sweltering doing the work but we got it all done by 3.25pm, which included about 40 mins for lunch.

By the time we had roofed the entire hut, we were tired and decided to call it a day. We haven’t quite made up our minds about the roof – use the felt supplied or go for a corrugated roof with insulation beneath. So we will have to leave things for a few days while we earn a crust so we decided to cover the roof with a tarpaulin. It is not big enough but I have a bigger one that will go on before the rain arrives tomorrow afternoon.

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After my friend James left, I was still in the mood to just potter about and do a little more. So I fitted the doors and the door frame and that was a fairly easy process. I just needed my wife to hold the components steady while I screwed them and we got the doors hung after a bit of messing about trying to put them on backwards!

Then I decided to fit the little gates things at the end of the porch. I was hot and tired and not at my brightest so there was an awful lot of head scratching and trying to figure out these strange hinges. I have never seen anything like them in my life before. On the left, that’s just one hinge – I know they are special and let the little gate thing swing either way and open back out of the way. I couldn’t figure out how to fit them, so I left that for another day when I am less tired and hot and bothered…

I contemplated getting out the primer and doing the new pieces we had fitted – mainly the porch – and also the underside of the interior roof but it was still very hot and I decided instead to make up the steps which was a fairly easy task.

Shepherd Hut Completed.

So that’s it. There is more work to do – the roof in whatever material we decide to do it, but other than that we’re pretty much there. There’s the fitting out to do – prime and paint the rest of it; add the exterior trim, run some electric cables inside for lights and power; insulate inside and then panel the walls; lay an oak laminate floor; general painting and decorating and “dressing” the hut, etc. etc. I’ve bought a sofa bed from Ikea specially for it and I have been collecting a few period things that will look the part. But that is an on-going fun element which we will do over the next couple of weeks because we are in no hurry.

As I was reading customer comments on building one of these, it was suggested you can build one in a weekend. Of course the devil is in the detail – at what stage do you determine it is built? If you look at our timings and what you see in the photo above, then certainly, two averagely handy guys, working at a steady, unrushed pace, got this far in a long weekend. If we were building the other one, I think it would be quicker because we did an awful lot of head scratching and that’s understandable. There are no written instructions in terms of describing that you need to do this, then that, etc. etc. and how you do it. The manual is made up of about 18 pages of drawings – very well annotated drawings – that show you what is needed, and where and how it is placed. It shows you what screws to use and where necessary, there are little exploded drawings for key details. It is easy to miss something or confuse two pieces of the jigsaw so double check everything. That is not to criticise the instructions – but what we realised is that we weren’t familiar with following this kind of instruction booklet and at times things didn’t make sense. And then the penny would drop and you would see what was required and it was easy.

I think, most of all, I’m happy with the attitude we approached the build with: this is going to be fun. Let’s enjoy this. We certainly did despite the head scratching as we turned another page onto another stage of the build until it sank in what we were looking at and what we needed to do.


Thank you to James for your article. We appreciate the amount of detail and passion you show in both your writing and your images! I send my best wishes for when you build the other one and modify it. We would love to see images of the interior design when you’re finished!

Other customer experiences, build articled and ideas can be found here: Pictorial Tuin Reviews.

Shepherd Hut Inspiration

A customer has sent me today a CD of their pictures of our shepherd hut, Gypsy Wagon. This is their pictorial story of the arrival, installation and final finishing of their shepherd hut that you may enjoy, the finishing is of particular inspiration if you have, or are considering this building.


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Knocking down an old shed

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Preparing the ground

Perimeter is marked out

Perimeter is marked out

Shepherd hut arrives.

Shepherd hut arrives.

Well packaged and delivered with a de-mountable forklift

Well packaged and delivered with a de-mountable forklift

Shepherd hut Chassis

Shepherd hut Chassis

Main outside rails and chassis is installed

Main outside rails and chassis is installed

All the cross members and rails are in and the floor can be laid

All the cross members and rails are in and the floor can be laid

Floor and veranda is laid

Floor and veranda is laid

Walls and front and rear 'apexes' are fitted

Walls and front and rear ‘apexes’ are fitted

Roof hoops are fitted

Roof hoops are fitted

Steps and veranda parts are installed

Steps and veranda parts are installed

Roof boards are nailed onto the hoops

Roof boards are nailed onto the hoops

NOTE:

The beauty of our Shepherd huts / Gypsy wagons is that they can be customised to whatever you want and this is why so many customers buy our buildings and several businesses exist because of it.

Up to the picture above this was a standard install and now it gets interesting.

Mr U now started to make his own modifications and changes. The following is non standard and not supplied by us but may inspire your own build.

Ignoring our supplied roofing felt Mr U is using a corrugated roofing material

Ignoring our supplied roofing felt Mr U is using a corrugated roofing material

Paint starting to be applied in traditional colours

Paint starting to be applied in traditional colours

Additional battens in the walls and laminate flooring is installed. An electrical circuit is also now in place.

Additional battens in the walls and laminate flooring is installed. An electrical circuit is also now in place.

A stunning oak laminate floor fitted on top of the standard floor

A stunning oak laminate floor fitted on top of the standard floor

Insulation boards fitted in the wall panels.

Insulation boards fitted in the wall panels.

Timber clad lining is being fitted

Timber clad lining is being fitted

Tongue and groove timber lining - we can also supply lining boards of 18mm and 27mm if asked.

Tongue and groove timber lining – we can also supply lining boards of 18mm and 27mm.

Lining complete and starting to paint for the final finish.

Lining complete and starting to paint for the final finish.

Further painting

Further painting

The finished Shepherd hut / Gypsy Wagon.

There has been a huge amount of work in this project but with building of this standard often sold in excess of £10,000 a little work yourself can pay off if you have the time and DIY skills.

These are the finished pictures:

Frosted glass motif in the rear window

Frosted glass motif in the rear window

A stunning writing desk feature

A stunning writing desk feature

Looking towards the rear of the shepherd hut - an amazing finish.

Looking towards the rear of the shepherd hut – an amazing finish.

The completed Hut - Stunning!

The completed Hut – Stunning!

Thank you Mr U for taking the time to photograph and send me these pictures. I hope my present was thanks enough for the inspiration you have given.

To see other customer experiences, build and ideas with our products, this page links several of them together: Pictorial Tuin Reviews

We also have a new version of this Shepherd Hut with doors in the side: Shepherd Hut Deluxe

Shepherd Hut / Gypsy Wagon

I’ve been meaning to write this post for a little while now and haven’t quite had the time since my family and I bought and built one of the popular Shepherd Hut / Gypsy Wagon we supply. (Update – NEW Version with Doors in the side: Shepherd Hut Deluxe)

We’ve got a small field away from our home that as a family we all like to muck around in, it’s great fun for the kids and you can’t beat cooking sausages on an open fire. I’ve always had a hankering for a slightly different style of home office than is the norm. I work a great deal from home and I have always wanted somewhere different from my usual spot away from the daily bustle of family life.

The field makes for a perfect location but the trouble is I would never get planning permission for a log cabin on it as it is designated ‘agricultural use’. I need something totally portable and truly temporary, the Shepherd hut / Gypsy wagon fits the bill perfectly. I wouldn’t want to move it too far but with the aid of the tractor it will move and that’s good enough for me and is indeed a ‘temporary structure’.

We built this during Easter and still haven’t got around to making my perfect office from it. In fact it is still a bare shell but over the winter when work is a little quieter I intend to replace the glass with double glazing and insulate it. I’ll then make some fitted units; a desk, sofa, cupboards etc and with a wood burner installed it should be very cozy. Electricity will come from solar panels and battery storage back up. When I do get around to finishing it I’ll update this post but for now here’s some pictures and a short video at the end. I hope you find this useful if you are considering one of our Shepherd Huts / Shepherd Hut Deluxe

Shepherd hut chassis and base construction

Chassis and base construction takes the most amount of time in the build, the wheels and metal chassis are built first, then the timber frame and then the floor and veranda area. This part of the build took about three hours with my wife and two helpful children.

Chassis and base construction

Be careful when you lay the floor as their is a start and a finish floor board. We made the mistake of not identifying it and had to cut the final board. It wasn’t a problem but annoying I hadn’t spotted it sooner ….. as I always say …. READ the plans …. doh!

The shepherd hut has panelled walls.

The walls are all made of individual panels and are simply screwed together. It does help to have a couple of G clamps handy to clamp them together before you screw them. Also pilot the holes first. All the screws are Torx and you get a couple of spare bits but don’t drop them!

You'll notice my slabs supporting it are just laid directly on the ground, I didn't want to disturb the ground at all and with the adjustable feet it's not a problem getting it level.

You’ll notice my slabs supporting the Shepherd hut are just laid directly on the ground, I didn’t want to disturb the ground at all (planning) with the adjustable feet the chassis has though it’s not a problem getting the building level.

Roof trusses on the shepherd hut

The roof is supported on pre-curved trusses. When you fit these don’t rely 100% on the measurements given as at my first attempt I wasn’t exactly in the middle of the roof board sections. I found it easier in the end to use the roof boards for each section as a template.

Roof boards on the gypsy wagon

Each of the roof boards are individually nailed on. Like the floor there is a start and an end board, watch out for them and identify them first as they will catch you out. It is also a good idea to measure the boards across the arch to find exactly where to start it. We put the small section on fist and only tacked it to get this part right and exactly even both sides.

painting the shepherd hut

Once up the painting went on long into the night. When it is first built it is very white and we wanted to hide it amongst the trees quickly hence the camouflage green paint.

Finished Shepherd hut / Gypsy wagon.

Finished Shepherd hut / Gypsy wagon. Yes the painting isn’t that great but we wanted to make the shepherd hut as unobtrusive from the road as possible. The window sections on the side can be put in either wall but only in the middle section of the building. As you can see we put both windows in the right hand wall as that will be the final position of my desk with a sofa on the opposite wall.

Gyps Wagon

With a couple of friends to visit it really did look more like a gypsy wagon! Neighbours actually thought we had bought an original wagon, they thought it was an antique and the genuine article!

Gypsy wagon and pony

This is going to be an ongoing project for the family, hopefully we’ll have time over the winter to finish it off and update this post with the details. Here’s a quick video I took of it.

UPDATE

A year on and I still haven’t lined the inside as I wanted to,  I’ll get there in the end and post here when I do.

BUT I now have sheep, I’m the very proud owner of eight Hebridean sheep who enjoy sleeping under the shepherd hut at night.

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A little dream of mine come true …  a shepherd hut complete with sheep!