FREE Offer Roof Shingles

Last Update – 6th November 2019 at 1330

Available Offer Shingles with your Log Cabin

  • 40.9970/3m/2k Black Straight
  • 40.9971/3m/2k Red Straight
  • 40.9981/3m/2k Red Half Round
  • 40.99731/3m/2k Blue Half round
  • 40.99752/3m/2k Grey Hexagonal
  • 40.99861/3m/2k Brown Hexagonal
  • 40.99821/3m/2k Green Diamond
  • 40.9975/2m/2k Grey Diamond
  • 40.99861/3m/2k Black Diamond
  • 40.9982/3m/2k Green half round – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.9987/3m/2k Green Hexagonal – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.9984/3m/2k Brown Half Round – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.9972/3m/2k Green Straight – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.9974/3m/2k Brown Straight – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.99851/3m/2k Black Hexagonal – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.99811/3m/2k Red Diamond – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.9975/3m/2k Grey Straight – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.99741/3m/2k Brown Diamond – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.9980/3m/2k Black Half Round – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.9973/3m/2k Blue Hexagonal  – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.9986/3m/2k Red Hexagonal  – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.9973/3m/2k Blue Straight  – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.9986/3m/2k Dark Red Hexagonal  – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.9973/3m/2k Blue Straight – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.9981/3m/2k Dark Red Half Round  – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.99852/3m/2k Cedar Wood Hexagonal  – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.99801/3m/2k Black Triangle – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.99751/3m/2k Grey Triangle OUT OF STOCK

These go VERY quickly.  Please let us know at point of order what you would like with your cabin.  These change daily and we do try to update this page as they change.

Further information on roof shingles and the market: Roof Shingles for Log Cabins.

We try to meet you preference but this is NOT GUARANTEED

We will try though to accommodate your choice but don’t shout at us if a certain style or colour has gone please. If the colour and style is important to you please consider ordering the ones you require, we’re the cheapest available for IKO shingles anywhere so regardless of the free offer ones or bought you won’t find a better deal with any other supplier. 97% of the time we can meet your preference except when stocks are very low.


UPDATE:  Shingle Glue

Although there is a bitumen strip on the tiles and that they should also be nailed in at least three places on a strip we are recommending (due to our dodgy weather recently) that you consider also applying Felt Shingle Glue along the leading edge when sited in exposed areas. This is also necessary with low pitched roofs.

UPDATE: Membrane

IKO are now recommending a membrane under layer is also applied. As a company we do not think this is necessary on garden buildings and nor does other garden building companies. However if you wish for a underlay membrane please see of roofing felt page for standard felt or IKO recommended membrane. If you are using a membrane we would recommend the standard felt over the IKO membrane but the choice is yours. Please note for lower pitched roofs and flat roof a membrane is recommended by us as is shingles glue.

Further information on roof shingles and the market: Roof Shingles for Log Cabins.


When shingles are available:

When shingles are free and available they can be selected from this drop down menu on the product page.

If you want to buy alternative shingles or they are not available:

If we do not have the free ones you require or they are not available please order them from here.

Do you need Roof shingles on your Log Cabin?

Do you need FREE ones? In my opinion the answer is always yes!

When I was first involved within this industry about fifteen years ago log cabins also emerged as a popular alternative to the humble shed or summerhouse. Back then it was unthinkable to sell them without shingles.  As well as the style of the buildings the shingles set them far apart from a common shed which of course a log cabin is not.  Then, about five years ago some bright spark realised that if they sold the cabin with felt they could undercut everyone else making them look the best value for money.

So, now you will find everyone sells cabins with felt as everyone had to follow as customers look immediately at the head line price when zipping through the internet or a brochure.  Roof shingles then became an option across all retailers, which is a real shame as I think all Log Cabins need roof shingles to become anything other than a crappy shed.

You’re buying a building that will last forever if cared for, surely you want a roof material that will do the same?

As an example, here’s a shed roof with felt:

Shed felt roof - Horrible isn't it!

Shed felt roof – Horrible isn’t it!

This is what is supplied as standard with all log cabins these days.  It’s ordinary shed felt and as such it doesn’t look nice at all.  Try applying this to a pyramid roof or a roof over 3m in length, it’s horrible and impossible to make it look nice, more than likely you’ll end up ripping it as well, you’ll see the roofing nails and anything more than about 3m you’ll end up with ripples and bubbles in it.

This is a picture of shingled roof a customer proudly sent us:

Log cabin with roof shingles

Log cabin with roof shingles

It looks so much better, it turns a ‘Shed’ in to a proper garden building.  It also lasts for years, no nails can be seen, no ripples and no rips and of course you won’t have to do it again in a couple of years time.

Here’s a few pictures of my own log cabin, it sits directly under trees and has taken years of abuse, I’ve never cleaned the roof or carried out any maintenance (as I wonder what will happen eventually) and it’s still as water tight as it’s ever been

Old felt shingled log cabin

Old felt shingled log cabin

Here’s another view of the poor thing:

An old log cabin shingled roof

An old log cabin shingled roof covered in moss, algae and bird droppings.

This building is very old now as you can see but the tiles are still going strong.  An ordinary felt roof would need replacing after about two – three years, less if it had trees over it like my old log cabin.

Standard Roof Shingles

Within our catalogue and drop down lists on all the cabins we have shingles that can be selected in a variety of colours, most of which can be available in straight, hexagonal or curved style.  you can also see our roofing materials in the category:  Roofing for Log Cabins.  These are all manufactured by a company called IKO who enjoy world renowned success and unrivalled quality, you really can’t get better than these, if you watch the movies you’ll see them on all the American houses as they love their felt shingles.

Roofing options

I’ve hated the fact that we sell buildings with ordinary felt, in fact a colleague tells me “she shudders” when a customer buys a log cabin without them, to tell you the truth I do as well as felt really does spoil what should be a stunning building.

It also saddens me when a customer calls up and asks for shingles saying: “they should have ordered them with the building“, which, they should have and we try to encourage them to but some customers think we’re trying to up-sell and refuse at the time of order.

It’s then upsetting for them and us when we can’t offer them at the price on the web page as those prices are calculated taking the standard felt away and no delivery charges as they are priced to go with the cabin.  When we then have to charge them higher prices due to delivery and no removal of the felt costs they get a bit miffed and disappointed.

Normal prices of felt shingles can be seen in the roofing category.  It’s not good for either of us to be disappointed so please think about shingles with your order, we’re not up-selling we’re making an honest recommendation.

Now the good bit …..

FREE Offer Roof Shingles

I’m going to go back to the old days of log cabins and offer FREE shingles with all our log cabins AND the prices of the buildings aren’t going to go up either unless the Euro exchange rate forces us to or a promotion ends.  The point is our FREE offer shingles aren’t going to impact on the prices.

Tuin is pretty big and we have come up with a solution so we don’t have to send you the dreaded standard roofing felt. All our old stock, last years colours, shingles in damaged packaging etc are all sitting around and aren’t sell-able as a brand new product.  Normally we will sell these in bulk to shed manufacturing companies when they ask for them. Instead of selling these to the trade we’re going to keep them and are now offering them FREE with all our log cabins and shed manufacturers are going to be a little peeved with us.

There is a tiny catch though

I really do wish we could get back to the old days of a log cabin inclusive of shingles and you simply choose a colour.  But, the shingles are expensive things, an average log cabin is 18 sq.m  a packet of shingles covers 3 m.sq.  That’s an average of 6 packs of shingles with an average cost of about £180.  Some people don’t want to pay the extra £180 on a building and who can blame them if they are happy with roofing felt (uuurrrgh)

So, we’re going to give you the Offer shingles FREE on all the log cabins but the catch is we get to choose what style (straight, curved or Hexagonal) and what colour we send to you without charging you for them.  This is because we don’t know what we have / will have of the offer shingles at any one time until we allocate them to an order.

I hope you don’t mind?  There’s got to be a trade off and you’re getting the shingles for free.  Of course after placing an order we will email you the colour we are sending and if you don’t like it you can opt for the standard roofing felt.

Alternatively you can choose a colour and style of your choice from this season ranges using the drop down menu on each of the log cabin product pages so you know exactly what you’re getting.  You’ll find all our shingle prices better than any competitor anyway!

Competitors

I don’t know of any supplier / manufacturer / retailer who can even get close to this offer. Have you found anyone who can offer shingles at our prices, even the standard ones? Let alone FREE shingles! OK, after a search I did find one supplier but the price of the cabins are far too expensive to worry us about.

Old days of Log Cabins

Well, we’re almost back to the old days.  At least now we can sell cabins with shingles again and still be the most highly competitive supplier there is in the UK.

Please understand though we may not be able to keep this up all the time so we do reserve the right to stop the offer when stocks are depleted and this will generally be without much notice at all so please don’t shout at us if you suddenly see the offer has been withdrawn on the log cabin you have been thinking about for a little while.

Before you ask, we’re really sorry but when it ends it ends and we can’t offer them retrospectively.  This is much like all our offers.  We are honest and always will be if it’s offered please take it.  When it’s gone it’s gone.

Felt shingles roof on our Stuttgart log cabin

Felt shingles roof on our Asmund log cabin.  The proper way a log cabin should look.

Installation of Shingles on an Apex or Pyramid roof videos

Further information on roof shingles and the market: Roof Shingles for Log Cabins.

Pent Installation Roof Advice

A little insight to how you can format the parts of our Modern log cabins

So you have built up your new log cabin up to roof height and you will come across a sight like the one below, the skeleton of a roof ready to be finished off.

Up to roof height with purlins added

I have made a quick guide which I hope proves useful, there are different methods in doing this roof style that you may prefer to use.

Firstly lets identify all the roof components that we will eventually call upon, in this case we have the two-tiered eaves boards for all four sides, squared battens and a mixture of mounting slats and blocks, sometimes the eaves boards for the longer cabins arrive in half lengths which when offered up to one another span the full required length. 

Identifying Roof Components

A good opportunity is often missed at this stage which is treatment and plenty of it as a lot of these parts become very inaccessible once you get further along, for more guidance on what treatments to use you may be interested in the following; https://www.tuin.co.uk/blog/log-cabin-treatment-again/

To begin with let us install the mounting blocks on the front and back of this particular log cabin, these provide more support for the eaves boards when you fit them, sometimes these blocks can be fitted to the sides instead, depending on the model, to fix these I am going to use a two of the 60mm screws at each point.

Starting to install the mounting blocks

Please do not think too long and hard where the mounting blocks need to be placed, as if the plans in front of you do not show a specific precise location, as the eaves boards may have arrived disassembled as shown in the second image above, just place them in a realistic fashion and copy the same for the back.

Mounting blocks also fitted to the back wall

The mounting blocks have all been fitted, so now it is time to think about making up the eaves boards, in this case we have been supplied with a narrow and a wider board, these two together make up the full eaves height, you may have seen that the plans are telling me to use the wider boards on the top, so let us do just that.

Eaves boards ready to be assembled

To join the two boards together we need to use the mounting slats supplied in the kit and identified earlier, anything can be used including spare pallet timber.
Please pilot drill these before securing them, by doing this with any wood you can be more sure that the wood will not split or crack, make sure their locations are correct, use the roof as a guide lining up the slats with the blocks already in place or take measurements.

Offering Eaves boards up to the fitted block locations to aid positioning

Screw the mounting slats all onto one side of the boards, I used 30mm screws which worked nicely.

Screws sent though the mounting slats into the eaves boards

Mounting slats lining up with mounting blocks and overhanging the wall logs/purlins.

Mounting slats lining up with mounting blocks

Now we have all the eaves boards made up as well as all mounting blocks and slats fitted, we then need to think about how we want the chosen roof material to be formatted.Roofing Felt, Easy Roofing or EPDM

Felt, Easy roofing and EPDM Roofing for our pent roofed log cabins

Fitting roofing felt, Our aim is to fold this under the roof edge on all four sides of the roof securing it into place using the supplied battens or sourced trims.

Fitting Easy Roofing ( ERM ) this is an easier solution to roofing felt and requires no nails as its all self adhesive, A heat gun in the colder months of the year is suggested to enhance the overlaps

Fitting EPDM now we save the best until last! The Epdm rubber roof, supplied with a spray adhesive and laid straight onto a “clean dust free roof”, like with the easy roof you would dish this up on the inside faces of the eaves boards on all four sides or just the front three

FELT ROOFING FIRST

We do have a video showing how felt in general is laid which for the basic principle is important as well as our very detailed online installation manual for pretty much everything you would need to know about getting the cabin constructed from the ground up; https://www.tuin.co.uk/blog/tuin-tuindeco-log-cabins-instruction-manual/

but more specifically here for a pent roofs which we hope helps further.

Assuming it is felt that we are fitting today we need to get the roof boards on before anything else, However what we like to suggest at this stage is to temporally tac your front eaves on first as this then gives you a line to offer them all up against knowing they will be correct.

Eaves boards fixed to the blocks ready for the roof boards

You may find that the mounting slats obstruct some of the roof boards from sitting flush so I am trimming them down, or I could have trimmed the relevant roof boards instead to slot around them.

Cutting the mounting slats so the roof boards fit flush, The roof boards could be trimmed instead where required

With the slats trimmed the roof boards sit flush against the inside face

When you go to fit the last roof board you nearly always need to rip it down to allow it to sit flush with the ends of the purlin(s)

Remember to use two nails or screws per board at every junction as the roof boards are key to strengthening the whole building, in the summer leave a 2mm gap
in-between each board whereas in the winter you close them up as tight as possible.

After that you can then remove the front eaves board as its time to fit the felt.

As mentioned, we really want to get the felt wrapped round the ends of the roof boards and under, most cabins come with battens to attach the felt under the boards, in this instance I have been supplied with the two long lengths as shown in a previous picture, I will use these and any other spare pallet timber to secure the felt if needed.

An example of how to finish the roofing felt around the ends of the roof boards

Another example showing how to overcome obstructions

You will at points have to work your way around the mounting blocks, purlins or wall logs, you could remove the blocks temporally while the felt is fitted. you can also leave the felt simply wrapped round the sides of the roof boards to avoid the obstacles but just be sure they are secured down in some way either using Felt Glue or clout nails, Ideally both.

After the felt is fully installed you can then fit all your eaves boards around all sides, the natural gap at the back is there to allow the water to drain off the roof

Expect a gap at the back of the roof, This is for drainage

EPDM or ERM Rubber Roofing

For more specific guidance on the actual installation of the rubber itself, Please visit the following for support and advice

https://www.tuin.co.uk/Easy-Roofing-Membrane.html

EPDM on LOG CABINS roofs.

For this cabin we opted for the Easy roofing as it is the best with no overlaps, the same fitting aid also applies for the Easy roofing, for these rubber options I am going to dish the roofing up on the front three sides then wrap it around the back to allow the run off.

After the initial stage of fixing all mounting blocks onto the cabin I am going to go ahead and fix all four completed eaves boards onto the sides of the roof.

A close up of a corner, Mounting slats cut and uncut as preferred

An extra pair of hands is useful for this part, but you could use clamps if you have some large enough. I screwed through the outside fascia of the eaves boards through the mounting slat into the mounting block with two 70mm screws at each point.

Eaves boards fitted at the back, Note they sit higher than those at the front due to the roof pitch

All eaves boards in place and ready for roof boards followed by the EPDM roofing

With them all fitted to the perimeter of the roof I’m ready to fit the roof boards following the same process as we did for the felt part of the guide.

Dishing of the rubber roofing can be formatted in different ways, As an example you can just have the rubber coming upwards against the inside face and apply a hidden trim to cap it off, however it is best to actually wrap the rubber around the top of the eaves board and down the other side as it helps prevent any possible ingress under it, you can then cap this off as you wish.

You may like to cut the mounting slats down on the front three sides like we did for the felt approach early as this makes offering the Epdm rubber roof easier to lay on the inside face of the boards.

Roof boards start getting laid, Remember two nails per board at every junction

Examples of how the rubber roofing can be dished up

Then for the back where the natural drainage gap is we are going to wrap it around the side of the roof boards, Some fitters at this point will actually make cuts into the tops of the blocks so they can get the EPDM wrapped further around, But you can just glue and tac the roofing to the sides

Some fitters will be very clever at this stage and actually cut a channel into the tops of the mounting blocks, eventually fitting a guttering length directing the water into a downpipe, you may need to increase the wood size of the block used depending on the gutter size, you can then glue the EPDM into the inner face of the gutter instead.

With a channel cut on the back overhangs you can fit a guttering length rigged up to a downpipe

I will mention once again that the methods above do not have to be strictly followed, “like anything in this world there are always room for enhancements!. “So fill your boots ladies and gents” and have a go. Any questions please feel free to contact us for advice

Log Cabin Offers

As we are preparing our 2018 catalogue, unfortunately we’re going to have to let go a few of our Log Cabins. So as a parting gift to some of our well known cabins, we are offering discounts!
See below for which cabins these include, this page will be updated as more offers come in, while stocks last!

In addition to these, we have recently added more offers around the site! Even with Log Cabins that will be staying in next years catalogue. You can start by looking in our Log Cabin page- these offers are available until the end of the year!

The Offers Available Are As Follows: 


The Gigamodern Log Cabin. 

The Gigamodern Log Cabin

Featuring a contemporary flat roof, storage shed and large open side shelter supported by two posts.

With flat roof, the 40mm Giga Modern Log Cabin is designed to imitate the wide, horizontal lines of the natural landscape. Perfect for adding a contemporary feel to any garden, this log cabin combines a storage shed and side shelter into one practical building.

The Gigamodern Log Cabin– Now available for £2,358!


The Supermodern Log Cabin.

The Supermodern Log Cabin

Flat roof Super Modern Log Cabin measuring 4.2 x 4.2m. With centrally positioned double doors flanked by two bottom-hung sash windows.

The Supermodern Log Cabin is a contemporary style Cabin with a sleek flat roof, centrally positioned double doors and high positioned windows. Made from 40mm Spruce timber, the supermodern is a stunning design that offers all year round use!

The Supermodern Log Cabin– Now available for £2185.50!


The Lisette Garden Office Studio.

The Lisette Log Cabin

The Lisette garden office studio measures 6.09 x 3.64m and features double glazing and double skin 19mm clad walls.

The Lisette is split into two, one side an enclosed office and the other open as a gazebo, this layout is perfect for a multifunctional garden building. Making this Log Cabin perfect to be used as: a summerhouse, garden office, art/music studio and more!

The Lisette Log Cabin– Now available for £3,819.85!


The Kajsa Modern Studio.

The Kajsa Modern Studio

A contemporary flat roof model in 19mm cladding, the Kaisja studio features a double door and two fixed windows. Dimensions are 2.72 x 2.01m.

This Modern Studio may be smaller in size, but doesn’t stop you from having crisp, clean lines from the Spruce Cladding. With the two fixed windows being adaptable for either side of the Cabin, this is a perfect Log Cabin for art/music studios.

The Kajsa Modern Studio– Now available for £1,268.90!


The Morten Log Cabin 

Morten Gazebo Log Cabin

A unique combination, the Morten features both a gazebo and shed annexe in one garden building. Measuring 3.5 x 5.0m and manufactured using 28m tongue and groove logs.

Who needs a separate Gazebo and Storage Shed when you have them both with the Morten? Inspired by the log cabin summerhouse and shed combinations, a full height partition creates a distinction between the two functions. It also offers flexibility with the Gazebo being able to be installed on either side of the Shed.

The Morten Log Cabin– Now available for £2,112.23!


The Amstelveen Modern Log Cabin.

Amstelveen Log Cabin

The Amstelveen 28mm Log Cabin measures overall at 5.82m x 2.48m- Including the incorporated canopy area.

A cabin that screams modern, the Amstelveen Log Cabin features a three measure length gazebo, with a 2.8m x 2.48m Cabin ideal for storage use or as a main summerhouse. The Amstelveen offers all the functionality and versatility of a conventional garden shed. Yet instead of panels, this building is constructed using interlocking 28mm Swedish pine logs.

The Amstelveen Modern Log Cabin– Now available for £1,410.19!


This page was last updated on the 20/2/2018

Keep an eye on this page or follow our social media pages to be notified when this list has been updated!

Justine Log Cabin Review- Part 2

Not too long ago we received a nicely detailed review/installation overview of Mr E’s Justine Log Cabin. And to our delight we found another email from him with a part two! This one goes in-depth on their finishing touches to their cabin.


Mr E writes as follows: 

After the build comes the finish and protection. This again can be time-consuming but is very visible so a good job is vital. The cleverer amongst you will have planned to apply protection to the outside of your cabin before the construction, we didn’t.

We had ideas, as I mentioned earlier we thought we might try Shou Sugi Ban, this would have meant turning a propane burner on the outside surfaces (eek!), scorching the wood then painting linseed oil on, this is a Japanese method of wood preservation and gives a long-lasting finish but definitely needs a lot of thought (courage!) and must be done before construction.

With this in mind we must be happy with a dark colour, we hoped this would make the cabin less conspicuous as it is visible from the lane but we would use a lighter colour for contrast on the windows, doors and facias. After looking at several company websites including those recommended by Tuin and getting some sample colours (very few offer samples – strange) we settled on Osmo natural oil wood treatment from Germany, it promised simple application, got some good reviews and we liked their Quartz Grey 907 as the primary colour.

Osmo recommend two coats applied thinly, that lets the wood grain show through and recoating is simple, no prep just paint over. The product is economical to use and does go a long way, I used a 2.5L of the 907 Quartz Grey, giving the front and sides three coats (for a more solid colour) and so far one coat on the back (we have nesting birds in the back hedge and I’m trying not to disturb them) but I have enough left for a second coat. The contrast colour is 903 Basalt Grey and a 750ml can give everything two coats with a bit left over for touch ups. Obviously, it’s too early to tell on longevity but I’m very happy with our choice.

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The deck area has been treated with two coats of decking oil as has the faces of the timber frame and I have put up some black 76mm guttering which will discharge into a water butt.

The interior floor has been treated to 3 coats of Bona Mega clear satin varnish, this is a water based product and is quick and easy to apply and dries rapidly. As the garage contents must go in soon, the interior walls are not yet treated or painted, but that and the electrics hook up can wait until the garage extension is finished.

The void space below the deck is a useful log store at the front (I have put an angled liner under the deck to stop water dripping through the gaps) and the space below the cabin has a plastic sheet pinned down to stop weeds and damp and I have put in a basic rack using the pallet off cuts so that long timber and our surf boards can be stored in relative shelter.

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What I thought was the last job has been to construct some steps up to the deck using lots of offcuts from the project – bits of frame posts, the palate, roof boards and fascia boards topped off with the last of the deck boards.

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My wife now wants a small lean to shed on the back for ready use garden tools so more work is promised!
I hope this is of some use to prospective builders, it has been really fun, though hard work at times and I hear that a friend in Wales that is looking to buy a cabin so Micky and I might have to get our mallets out again.

The Justine Cabin Finished For Now

Looking Stunning Mr E!

 


Its always exciting to hear we might have another part to the installation story. Your Justine is looking stunning Mr E, and we love how you optimise space and left over resources! We look forward to hearing from you again!

Part 1 of Mr E’s Justine Log Cabin Review.

For other customer experiences, builds and ideas find them here: Pictorial Tuin Reviews.

Lauren Clockhouse Log Cabin Review

One of our customers was very generous in sending a review of their Lauren Clock House Log Cabin (previously known as the Special Ben), with plenty of images to show you guys the installation progress! We do love receiving images here at Tuin, so thank you Mr F for sending this to us!


Mr F writes as follows:

We were both extremely impressed with the quality of the material and the thought and precision that had gone into the preparation of the kit of parts.

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The 1st of 3 packages arrives, expertly manoeuvred by Barry, the truck driver. Each load was 20ft long and weighed about 1.7tons. By the second image there was a total of 5 tons of shed. Due to a lack of planning on my part they were going to remain unwrapped for about 2 weeks as the ground work was completed.

Work starts on the base about 08.00hrs. Quite a bit of soil had to be removed to
give us a level area. A load of scalping is delivered to the pit, in all, 12 tons was used to form a base for the cement.

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Kharn, the builder, with his whacker plate consolidates the scalping and the
shuttering is leveled. We finished at 20.30hrs – a long day but the pressure was on as we had booked the ready mix lorry for 08.00hrs the next morning.

Leveled Out Shuttering

Impressive work in just one day Kharn!

Day 2 at 07.55hrs, 13 tons of cement arrives… A small dumper truck was used to bring the cement to the site and frantic tamping continued for over 2 hours until all appeared level – very hard work!

A couple of days later and with the concrete hardened the rear bank was ‘landscaped’ and a trench for gravel dug at the base.

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Monday, Day 1 of construction at about 08.00hrs. The lower beams had been treated the day before and the black items are lengths of the plastic base material. The walls progressed nicely and the plastic base strips have just been cut to fit and slid under the lower logs. Note the log which will eventually be fitted above the door, has been temporarily positioned to keep things square despite the gap in the front wall.

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How the joints between the front and rear wall and the middle wall were to be made was a mystery to us but the long logs with vertical holes near the joints gave us a clue and answered the question, ‘what were the square pegs for?’.

The square pegs or ‘wall dowels’ had their corners and ends rounded slightly which still resulted in a satisfying tight fit but with less chance of splitting the logs. The 3 on the left have been treated with a belt sander. About 1 minute per peg and about 60 pegs in total. A pencil mark at the halfway point was useful when banging in.

Wall Dowels

Don’t worry Mr F, these can confuse most people!

About 12 hours after we started and we realise that it’s quite a big Log Cabin!

Installed Walls

The Lauren Clockhouse Log Cabin is one of our longest products!

Day 2 and the roof is progressing well. For the first 2 days of construction there were 3 of us working with lots of carrying from storage area to site and quite a bit of head scratching as we searched for various specific logs. Three pairs of hands were useful as we positioned and fixed the heavy purling.

A start is made nailing the tongue & groove roof boards into position. Much later and all of the boards are fixed. Rain was expected so we protected the roof. Probably no need to but it made us feel better.

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Day 3 was mainly spent nailing floor boards. The nail gun chose a bad time to fail and resulted in much manual hammering. Day 4 was mainly spent fixing shingles to the rear. A slow job but looked good when done. Ladders R Us.

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Day 5, the small gable comes in 3 pieces which we screwed together at ground level then lifted into position. Inevitably, it complicated the fixing of shingles on the front and it was quite late on the Friday before we finished. On days 4 & 5, some time was spent hiding from the heavy showers which slowed us down a little.

We used some heavier timber to trim the base of the roof to provide a substantial mount for guttering. Note the notches required to fit it around the left, right and middle wall. With a bit more thought I could have cut the timber longitudinally to a better shape for the gutter brackets but now I’ll have to custom make a mounting for each bracket.

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End of day 5. It looks like the finished product but still needs a lot of detail work and much brushwork. The most important pieces of paper. A list of contents annotated by me with the log positions and the detailed diagrams showing each log position.

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Happiness is 3 empty pallets. Progress would have been quicker if I were able to unpack and lay out in piles all the various bits of timber. The sheer quantity of wood (and the animals in the field) precluded that, so quite some time was spent rummaging for specific pieces as required. The timber had been cut very accurately and we found that the lengths on the plan, accurate to the millimeter, were very useful in identifying the required log.

Empty Palettes

True happiness indeed!

As garden buildings go, this was a big project and I wasn’t too surprised that the main build took 5 days. Kharn, a professional builder, and I were very impressed with the quality of the material and the accuracy with which it had been prepared. The joints were well thought out and accurately milled although we were dealing with significant lumps of timber and found a club hammer, with protective wood, more useful than a mallet! Even a sledge hammer was found a use in squaring-up the part built walls. Apart from the nails in the floor and roof boards, and the wall dowels, virtually no other fixings were used. The wall logs and purlins stay in position because of the clever joints while the entire building sits steady on its base because of its weight. The packing had been very well done and, as far as I am aware, no parts were missing. Indeed, the supply of plain wood parts seemed generous. Although
there were 450kg of shingles we were a little concerned that we would run out. With 378 shingles we finished the roof with 2 remaining – very well judged by the manufactures.

Overall, I’m a very happy customer and, more importantly, so is my wife! An outstanding product at a bargain price. As the Americans would say, ‘A lot of bang for your buck’. Many thanks for the excellent service and the experience of the build has got my builder friend thinking of buying a smaller version for himself. I hope to have the staining and guttering done soon and will send you a picture of the finished item.


Thank you again Mr F for a detailed and informative overview of your installation process for the Lauren Clockhouse Log Cabin. It looks great and we can’t wait to see your pictures for when it’s completely finished! I hope you and your wife enjoy your log cabin!

Other customer experiences, build articles and tips can be found at: Pictorial Tuin Reviews.

Julia Log Cabin

We have received a customer review from Mr P of their experience with installing their Julia Log Cabin. Thank you for sending this in!  We love how the bar turned out- It’s a great idea!


Mr P writes as follows: 

Back in February I purchased a Log Cabin from Tuin.

Several months later I have completed the project, turning it into a bar and brewery. Very pleased with it and your customer support and thought I would share some pictures with you!

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We love the bar and brewery Mr P! Thank you for sending in your images, we hope the brewing turns out well!

Other customer experiences, build articles and ideas can be found at: Pictorial Tuin Reviews.

Chloe Log Cabin Review

One of our lovely customers, who I will refer to as Mrs A has sent us a review of their experience of building their Chloe Log Cabin which would be used for a garden gym! As well as their service that they had received from our team here at Tuin.


Mrs A writes as follows:

At the bottom of my garden sat an 8x9ft Summer House, not a very old one around 18 months old which I purchased on-line the quality sadly reflected the price I paid from the on-line supplier. It was purchased for use as a gym by for my son, but it was soggy and damp and not fit for purpose as the walls were so thin and badly manufactured. We took it down and sadly it was so damp to the tip it went as I don’t think we would have been able to burn and sing around it as it went up in flames cursing the on-line supplier who’s rating on Trustpilot seems to have more red stars than I have ever seen.

We decided it was time to spend our savings on something bigger and much better quality that we could divide and use half as his gym and the other half as a nice relaxing space. I started the search, so many places to buy but as I had made such a bad purchase the first time around I didn’t want to make the same mistake again. My friend at work had been talking about a large summer house her friend had brought from a company called Tuin which she helped to build and couldn’t fault the company or the quality. So off to the Tuin website I went and started to look, the range of products was fantastic so many choices of all sizes, my imagination went wild and before I could stop myself was looking at the biggest ones I could get and imagining what I could put in side! However reality hit me that evening when I got home and measured the space I could use and although I was going to build a giant palace the biggest I could purchase was a 4x3m. I then found Chloe, she was the right size and looked perfect and even better in budget.

I contacted Tuin and after fantastic service from Richard, who I say goes over and beyond for customer satisfaction I placed the order in late February. As we had yet to build the base I picked the furthest delivery slot I could to allow us to build a concrete base where Chloe was going to take residence. Building the base seemed to take forever due to bad weather and finally it was done. Left it for a couple of weeks to dry off and then Chloe arrived and we were ready to build – have to say I enjoy DIY work but both me and my husband were really looking forward to the build it’s like giant Lego for adults and you get to use big mallets!

Now, onto the process of building Chloe…

When we ordered we selected a required delivery week and the Sunday before I received an email for payment, once this was complete I received a call from a very nice lady from the delivery company to arrange a delivery date.

We knew from looking on the Tuin website how the cabin would be packaged and the size of the packaging. I would recommend you take a look at the site so you have an idea how large your delivery will be so you can work out where you want it to be put. We knew that it would be a couple of weeks before we would be able to start the build so by having it placed in the garden next to the driveway would mean that we didn’t have to worry about not being able to use the driveway for the next couple of weeks.

She arrived on the advised date as promised, no sitting around for a delivery that doesn’t turn up when advised and we have all done that. I received call from driver that morning advising us roughly what time he would arrive, my husband was at home and was watching for the lorry, then down the road came a forklift with the cabin. The driver had had to park up the road and drive the forklift into our close as once he had the lorry in he would not have been able to get back out again. My husband asked if he could drop it other side of the drive which he did with no problems. A couple of my concrete edging blocks were slightly damaged and the driver was very apologetic but it’s wasn’t a problem, he had nearly a ton of cabin plus whatever his forklift weights driving over them which we asked him to do you cannot make an omelette without breaking a few eggs. He was unable to stop for a well-deserved cuppa as his very large lorry was parked up the road and didn’t want to upset anyone so he had to move it quickly. Chloe then sat in the front garden for a couple of weeks until we were ready to start the build.

The Chloe Log Cabin Unpackages

The unpackaged components to the Chloe Log Cabin

Picture taken after we had started to move the parts into the back garden (sorry I forgot to take a picture of the wrapped package). If you don’t start your build straight away don’t worry the cabin is so well wrapped it will be fine, and will wait until you are ready.

As you move parts sort them as you go putting all the parts into piles according to size, you can then use the checklist provided to check you have all the parts. I did expect parts to be numbered which would make it easier but none of them were, however as you start to check off the larger parts then it does become easier.
When we finished checking parts I noticed that one of the parts had a large crack, we wanted to start build over the weekend so I emailed Tuin out of hours service to see if we were able to use the part or needed a replacement (it was 9pm on a Friday night) and I received a response within 15 mins. I sent over pictures of the damage and was advised it was fine to use or if I wasn’t happy they could send a replacement. We opted to use it but receiving a response on a Friday night was great service. Really I wanted peace of mind it was ok to use, last thing we wanted to do was use it only to find out we should have waited for a replacement.

Day 1, the build started at… 10am…

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I am helping, but someone has to take pictures ☺ however to get to this stage has taken 30 mins and most of that time it was checking that everything was square. The whole cabin is slotting together very nicely.

By the last image we were ready to put in the doorframe, a quick email to Tuin as from the instructions we were not 100% sure on orientation of the frame. Saturday morning and quick response received from Tuin clarifying our question and we are good to go again. Tuin’s contact team can go back to watching Saturday morning Kitchen ☺

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To be honest, the build is so much quicker than we expected!

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It’s now around 5pm and the cabin is built! We are calling it a day as it seems the neighbours have had enough of us banging in the garden all day. Despite me not being in any of the pictures it has taken just 2 of us to build this in one day. The build went very well, only one slight problem with the door not shutting correctly, this was a job for the next day.

Day 2, time to put on the roof tiles… Not so many pictures of this as we were both on the roof. One slight problem nothing to do with the cabin but the ladder being on very uneven ground meant that it slipped when we were up on the roof and neither of us could get down. The cabin might not look very high from the ground but it is high when you want to get down. After a few min’s of us laughing about how we were going to get down and me trying to step onto damaged shed roof our neighbour noticed and asked if we wanted her to come round and hold the ladder. We arrived on the ground safely which was a bit of a relief as after too many cups of tea before starting on a cold day nature was calling.

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The shingles do take a long time to put on, most of the day to be honest but once you get the hang of putting them on it is very easy. Yes it would be quicker and easier with felt but once you take a step back and look at the result well I think it says it all!

So Chloe is now completed and looking great. The base around Chloe does look a bit of a mess but that job is for next weekend.

The finished image of the Chloe Log Cabin

The following weekend; decking, steps and raised platform fitted.

Chloe is finished!

The quality of the product is excellent, the cabin is well designed and slots together so well, we are very pleased and Chloe is now the pride of our garden.

The whole Tuin team are a pleasure to deal with, they are all very knowledgeable they know the product inside out and I would have no problem in recommending them.

You may be wondering why none of the pictures show the inside of the cabin, well I intend to write another review once the floor is down, as we blew our budget on the cabin we have been saving for the floor, also at the moment a few bits of furniture and a weight bench sitting on a concrete floor does not really show her off. We intended to put down a plywood base sitting on some 2×2 with laminate floor on top, but after sitting inside and looking at the walls and roof this would not do her justice. The floor would look so much better with ‘real’ wood so we have just placed an order for the wooden floor pack which we feel will look so much better. Once this is down then I will take some more pictures of the inside.

Well think I have just about covered it, thank you Tuin!

 


Thank you to Mrs A for your article, reading how our customer service helped ease your confusion on building was great to hear. Your Chloe log cabin looks stunning! We’ll be looking forward to see images on how you modify the inside of your log cabin to make your gym/relaxation area!

Other customer experiences, build articles and ideas can be found here: Pictorial Tuin Reviews