Daisy Log Cabin and Annexe Show Site Build

Hello everyone! So, while I (Meg) was out of the office for a week, the office still continued to work non stop! I came back to christmas decorations everywhere and a new showsite install! At first I was a bit disappointed the installation of the Daisy Log Cabin and 28mm Side Annex without me but one of our new/training sales assistants, Becky, told me she carried out some of the installation! Its an excellent way to learn about our products and how they are installed and she was even so kind enough to do her own write up about it for you guys!


Becky writes as follows: 

I’m new to the Tuin team and wanted to get hands on in the assembly of a log cabin to gain a better understanding of the process behind it, enabling myself to then be able to give personal and experienced advice to our customers as part of the Sales Team.

I would just like to point out that when I started I had absolutely zero DIY knowledge, skills or experience.
Furthermore assembling the cabin in the cold, rain and snow was also an experience, although it was a great opportunity to prove that bad weather never hinders the construction of a cabin, apart from my cold fingers!
Additionally, I can confidently say that building a cabin is not as hard as I first believed. Once you know what you’re doing, everything just slots together and before you know it it’s up!

On my third week of training I was given the opportunity to construct the roof on the Daisy and build the annexe on the side.
I put up my step ladder inside the cabin alongside one of our more experienced members of the team and together we fitted the roof of the Daisy. It was all tongue and groove so the pieces of timber literally just slotted together and then we nailed it in.
For starters I had never even held a hammer before this point let alone hammer roof nails in!

Roofboard Installation

Seems like the sun came out to give you the perfect selfie lighting- The roof behind you is looking great!

The further along the roof we went the space to put up the ladder was running out, it was time to get on top of the roof!
I was surprised at how sturdy it actually was because I was prepared to be falling through. So there I was at the end of November on my knees nailing on the roof boards. (Though because I was the one to put my name in to helping.. I did make sure to wrap up! It was just very cold haha)
In between multiple cups of coffee purely to warm up my insides, the roof was on.
It was a good opportunity to gain an understanding of the natural contraction and expansion of timber. But with a firm knock into place the roof looked pretty good if I do say myself.

Log Cabin Wall With Coffee

You look energised for your future tasks thanks to coffee!

Then came the shingles, what I perceived to be the next challenge but they in fact were also very easy to do! We started from the bottom of the roof, with the first set upside down to ensure coverage of the roof, and from then on worked our way up to the ridge.

I was then trusted enough to build the annexe by myself. Just me, the timber and the plans…

Firstly I made a level base with just three pieces of tanalised timber, I secured the annexe base using screws and then screwed the base into the side foundation beam of the Daisy Log Cabin; ensuring my base was 100% flat, level and square I was all set to go.
The starter half logs are simply put normal logs just cut in half so that they have a flat bottom, making it easy to sit on top of the foundation beams. You don’t have to, but I screwed these onto the foundation beams just for extra stability.

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From here on the rest of the logs just slotted on top of each other, about five logs up I stopped and lowered the door into place. I was clear to see that it was a good thing I didn’t go any higher as I wouldn’t have been able to lift the door up high enough to slide it into place. From here I continued to knock the rest of the logs on top of each other.
Then it came to the roof, which was pretty much exactly the same as the Daisy Log Cabin but thankfully not as high.

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I started from the front of the annexe and worked my way towards the back, The roof boards were also tongue and groove making it nice and easy for them to all slot together. I was nailing these in as I went two at the top, middle and bottom onto the purlins.

It’s not quite finished yet, just the shingles to go, but overall it was an enjoyable first experience of building a Log Cabin and Annexe. By continuously referring back to the plans and taking my time to make sure it was all accurately in place, I was very successful.
It really emphasised to me how important it is not to look at all of the bits of timber and panic, because by following all of the steps, checking the plans regularly and taking it bit by bit it’s actually very easy to do. My new nickname is now ‘Becky the Builder’.

Just awaiting my next Cabin to construct! 🙂


Some superb work Becky! An excellent addition to the show site, and thank you for telling us how it all went, I’m glad you’re looking forward to your next installation!

You can start your next DIY adventure with the Daisy Log Cabin and the 28mm Side Annex available on our site.

To read more about our showsite installations, there are also ones on the Kennet Log Cabin and the Lennart Log Cabin installation blogs!

The Forgotten Log Cabin Accessory

I’m always being asked what’s the most needed accessory for a log cabin and I tell customers the usual:

  • Treatment – This can’t be overlooked, without this you won’t have a cabin worth keeping in a few years and you may also experience a few problems with it if overlooked – Log Cabin Treatment
  • Shingles – Without these it just looks really rubbish, felt shingles really does set a log cabin off – Free Offer Shingles
  • Roof shingle glue – This I always recommend for the ridge and especially if you are in an exposed area. My most favourite review on the site said about the glue: ‘The stickiest thing since Sticky the stick insect got stuck on a sticky bun!’ and yes it really is very sticky – Felt shingles Glue

After these three it then gets very building and need specific, you may want a floor, some supports for the canopy posts, maybe an extra window or doors, perhaps you want to add an internal wall, pressure treatment, maybe you want a posh finial etc.

All of our accessories can be found here: Log Cabin Accessories some of the major ones may already be on the drop down list of  the log cabin you are looking at.

I always forget about our annexes though so I’m writing this to show you but also to remind myself we have them, they’re at the top of the pages and I think as customers and myself whiz down the pages for a log cabin they’re looking for we both miss these handy accessories.

Log Cabin with a Storage Shed:

Some of our best selling log cabins have a shed adjoining them, buildings like the Agnes corner log cabin:

Agnes corner log cabin with a storage shed to the side in 45mm wall logs

Agnes corner log cabin with a storage shed to the side in 45mm wall logs

We have several of these buildings, they’re very popular and very handy indeed, here’s another one – The Lukas:

The Lukas log cabin with a shed integrated into it. Extremely handy

The Lukas log cabin with a shed integrated into it. Extremely handy and many customers love it’s practical nature of design.

My other personal favourite is the Wolfgang log cabin, this has been a long standing best seller:

The 45mm Wolfgang log cabin with a shed to the side and a delightful front porch.

The 45mm Wolfgang log cabin with a shed to the side and a delightful front porch.

So bearing in mind we have lots of best sellers with a shed to the side we really should cater more for this shouldn’t we?

Maybe more buildings featuring them? Except – I forget we do!

Log Cabin Annexe – Shed Extension

This is the accessory, the must have one I sometimes forget about and I know customers overlook as they whiz through our pages. It’s a very handy little annexe you can bolt onto your log cabin, even if you didn’t buy your log cabin from us:

A shed extension you can add to any log cabin, we have them in 28mm or 45mm thick wall logs.

A shed extension you can add to any log cabin, we have them in 28mm or 45mm thick wall logs.

We have these annexes, or shed extensions for your log cabins in two sizes with either a 28mm thick wall log or a 45mm one:

Versatile Extension for your Log Cabin

The lovely part of this accessory for your log cabin is that is can turn it into a completely different building, it becomes very practical and you have the best of both worlds, a shed and a summerhouse. Here’s some nice examples of the shed extension in use:

This is a 28mm extension being used with the Henning log cabin. This customer actually used it as a toilet.

This is a 28mm extension being used with the Henning log cabin. This customer actually used it as a toilet.

Here's another view, yup he has his toilet in there. He used to be in the house all the time but since having his cabin his wife tends to lose him most days!

Here’s another view, yup he has his toilet in there. He used to be in the house all the time but since having his cabin his wife tends to lose him most days!

This is a nice use of the log cabin shed extension, this customer has put it on the back of our Asmund Corner Log Cabin and turned a simple building into something a little more special:

The Asmund corner log cabin with a shed extension log cabin accessory to the rear of the build.

The Asmund corner log cabin with a shed extension log cabin accessory to the rear of the build.

I think this one is really nice, it’s totally changed the look of a standard log cabin. This cabin is the Johan, here’s a picture in it’s standard build:

Johan log cabin in it's standard build in 34mm logs, a lovely building as it is and very practical.

Johan log cabin in it’s standard build in 34mm logs, a lovely building as it is and very practical.

I like it as it is but when we add one of the annexes it transform it into something else with more potential and more uses:

Johan log cabin with a shed extension added to the front. This extension can be placed on most walls as required at installation.

Johan log cabin with a shed extension added to the front. This extension can be placed on most walls as required at installation.

Log cabin shed extension, you can have this in two sizes in either 28mm or 45mm thick wall logs and two sizes.

Log cabin shed extension, you can have this in two sizes in either 28mm or 45mm thick wall logs and two sizes.

The log cabin shed extension annexes are a nice addition, you may like to consider one with your cabin or maybe you already have a log cabin and fancy adding a storage shed to it. This annexe is a simple solution and worth considering as perhaps one of the most important log cabin accessories.