Log Cabin Window Stays

I thought it was quite a simple thing asking one of our young lads to finish a cabin by putting on the locks, window stays etc. He hasn’t been with us for very long and is  learning how to fit to eventually be a member of the service team.

We were fitting an Emma Log Cabin as a learning building and everything had gone as expected and I was leaving him to finish off while I chipped off to do something really important somewhere else. After a short while he came to find me and asked ‘How do you do this’? while holding a stay.

I thought it was quite straightforward and hadn’t really thought it was a tricky thing to do but this was my instruction to him which may also help others finishing their log cabin:

Fitting a Window Stay in Log Cabins

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The end of the window stay is normally hinged so it can be placed either left or right

left-window-stay

right-window-stay

Using the hinge we can either place the window stay to the left or right. It’s a choice of aesthetic and in the case of a corner log cabin such as the Emma log cabin it’s nice to have them either facing towards or away from the door.

If you're working on your own, use a piece of timber to hold the window shut

If you’re working on your own, use a piece of timber to hold the window shut

Centrally locate the window stay and place it on the two pins.

Centrally locate the window stay and place it on the two pins.

I like to use a slither of wood to raise the stay up from the securing pins slightly, it seems to work better and looks nicer at the end.

Fix the stay to the opening window first making sure it is level and centrally placed for aesthetics.

Fix the stay to the opening window first making sure it is level and centrally placed for aesthetics.

Open out the stay to fix the second screw.

Open out the stay to fix the second screw.

Lay the stay on the pins in its final position. Gently hold the pin in place with your finger as you lift it up again to fix the pin

Lay the stay on the pins in its final position. Gently hold the pin in place with your finger as you lift it up again to fix the pin

Be careful not to move the pin too much as you lift up the stay.

Be careful not to move the pin too much as you lift up the stay.

Screw one side of the pin and check it works.

Screw one side of the pin and check it works.

Some adjustment maybe needed to make the stay apply the appropriate pressure to the window making sure it seals.

Some adjustment may be needed to make the stay apply the appropriate pressure to the window making sure it seals.

When we have finished we need to make sure there is some pressure on the stay and pins to ensure the log cabin window is sealing tight against the frame. If necessary after checking move one side of the pin out as in the above picture.

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Fix the next screw after it has been rotated out slightly and then fix the next one, this will ensure there is some pressure on the window and is a handy technique when fitting these on your own.

window-pin-3

Window stay will now be at an angle to the window so when the final pin is fitted there will be constant pressure on the window making sure it is permanently sealed to the frame

The window stay will now be at an angle to the window so when the final pin is fitted there will be constant pressure on the window making sure it is permanently sealed to the frame

Some pressure is now needed to place the final pin, mark it and fix it into position.

Some pressure is now needed to place the final pin, mark it and fix it into position.

Fixing the final window stay pin

Fixing the final window stay pin

Log Cabin window stay in it's final position.

Log Cabin window stay in it’s final position.

Ideally when the stay is fitted it will be:

  • Centrally located
  • Facing towards or away from the door as is aesthetically pleasing with other window complimenting it
  • It should exert some pressure on the window to keep it sealed against the window frame

Please Note: The furniture fitted may not be identical to that received with your building as this was a training building but the process and style will be similar.

This entry was posted in Log Cabin Fitting Tips and tagged , , , , , by Richard. Bookmark the permalink.

About Richard

This blog is my personal platform which I do enjoy. It is my own viewpoint and my own ideas. I may not be right and other installers / experts may offer a different view point or a alternative way to do something. I welcome contributions from anybody experienced to do so.

All my blog writing is MY OWN personal opinion ONLY and is NOT always the opinion of TUIN | TUINDECO as a company.

Log Cabins and Garden timber have a myriad of intricacies , I love to give away the secrets, there are a lot!

I enjoy using this blog to expose them so you know what you are buying. I love to know I am causing a few problems in the industry as it can be on occasions less than honest.

I actively encourage everyone to install their own buildings. So many times I would fit and the company I was working for would charge loads for my time, only then to be faced with the embarrassment when the customer says 'I could have done that' and YES you can without paying hundreds of Pounds!

I have over 19 years experience within the garden timber industry. I have particular expertise in garden buildings including the manufacture, design and installation from sheds to log cabins and all the way up to timber framed houses.

In my time I have been involved with virtually every manufacturer and supplier of garden buildings. I have also installed pretty much every make of Garden Building there is from ALL suppliers and manufacturers.

Prior to my career change I was a Watch Commander in the Fire Service with particular expertise in chemical incidents, training, technical design / technology / IT /Procedures / ISO Systems and road traffic accidents. I retired due to a nasty injury after 20 years service.

During my time in the Fire Service, on my days off, I was a self employed fitter for any type of garden building, I worked with most of the well known companies as a subcontractor.

I now work with Tuin | Tuindeco in the UK, supporting and advising on the vast range of products. I keep an eye out for help requests when we a supposed to be closed and can usually get back to you out of hours via email only (wife and children permitting on my days off).

In my private life I consult as an independent expert assessor for companies or private individuals when a dispute is present over their structure which results in producing an impartial report and assessment for whoever requires it. This is often higher valued than a structural engineers report born from my credentials, experience and widely recognised as an 'Expert' in the field.

I am a freelance writer for numerous companies, publications and blogs as well as an independent expert and fault finder for parts of the Industry and consumers with a particular emphasis on timber structures, both framed and of an interlocking design such as log cabins.

I produce numerous articles about timber in general, information on general timber products and specific guides when needed. I hope you enjoy and find my writing useful.

Please contribute and comment to my posts as you would like and I will try to respond as best I can.

Thank you

Richard.

3 thoughts on “Log Cabin Window Stays

  1. Just finished fitting two stays, I found Richards bit of wood a bit of a guestimate, I used a 5mm spacer to measure the correct height to fix the stay and this allowed the correct/ideal height for the posts to work correctly. Hope this helps

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