FREE Offer Roof Shingles

Last Update – 20th May 2019 at 1730

Available Offer Shingles with your Log Cabin

  • 40.9970/3m/2k Black Straight
  • 40.9971/3m/2k Red Straight
  • 40.99811/3m/2k Red Diamond
  • 40.99741/3m/2k Brown Diamond
  • 40.9987/3m/2k Green Hexagonal
  • 40.9980/3m/2k Black Half Round – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.9984/3m/2k Brown Half Round – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.99861/3m/2k Black Diamond – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.9982/3m/2k Green half round – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.9986/3m/2k Red Hexagonal – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.9974/3m/2k Brown Straight – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.9975/3m/2k Grey Straight – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.99862/3m/2k Black Hexagonal – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.9972/3m/2k Green Straight – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.9981/3m/2k Red Half Round – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.99861/3m/2k Brown Hexagonal   – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.9973/3m/2k Blue Hexagonal  – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.9975/3m/2k Grey Straight  – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.99752/3m/2k Grey Hexagonal   – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.99821/3m/2k Green Diamond  – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.99851/3m/2k Black Hexagonal – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.9973/3m/2k Blue Straight  – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.9986/3m/2k Dark Red Hexagonal  – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.9973/3m/2k Blue Straight – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.9981/3m/2k Dark Red Half Round  – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.99852/3m/2k Cedar Wood Hexagonal  – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.9974/3m/2k Brown Straight – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.99801/3m/2k Black Triangle – OUT OF STOCK
  • 40.99751/3m/2k Grey Triangle OUT OF STOCK

These go VERY quickly.  Please let us know at point of order what you would like with your cabin.  These change daily and we do try to update this page as they change.

Further information on roof shingles and the market: Roof Shingles for Log Cabins.

We try to meet you preference but this is NOT GUARANTEED

We will try though to accommodate your choice but don’t shout at us if a certain style or colour has gone please. If the colour and style is important to you please consider ordering the ones you require, we’re the cheapest available for IKO shingles anywhere so regardless of the free offer ones or bought you won’t find a better deal with any other supplier. 97% of the time we can meet your preference except when stocks are very low.


UPDATE:  Shingle Glue

Although there is a bitumen strip on the tiles and that they should also be nailed in at least three places on a strip we are recommending (due to our dodgy weather recently) that you consider also applying Felt Shingle Glue along the leading edge when sited in exposed areas. This is also necessary with low pitched roofs.

UPDATE: Membrane

IKO are now recommending a membrane under layer is also applied. As a company we do not think this is necessary on garden buildings and nor does other garden building companies. However if you wish for a underlay membrane please see of roofing felt page for standard felt or IKO recommended membrane. If you are using a membrane we would recommend the standard felt over the IKO membrane but the choice is yours. Please note for lower pitched roofs and flat roof a membrane is recommended by us as is shingles glue.

Further information on roof shingles and the market: Roof Shingles for Log Cabins.


When shingles are available:

When shingles are free and available they can be selected from this drop down menu on the product page.

If you want to buy alternative shingles or they are not available:

If we do not have the free ones you require or they are not available please order them from here.

Do you need Roof shingles on your Log Cabin?

Do you need FREE ones? In my opinion the answer is always yes!

When I was first involved within this industry about fifteen years ago log cabins also emerged as a popular alternative to the humble shed or summerhouse. Back then it was unthinkable to sell them without shingles.  As well as the style of the buildings the shingles set them far apart from a common shed which of course a log cabin is not.  Then, about five years ago some bright spark realised that if they sold the cabin with felt they could undercut everyone else making them look the best value for money.

So, now you will find everyone sells cabins with felt as everyone had to follow as customers look immediately at the head line price when zipping through the internet or a brochure.  Roof shingles then became an option across all retailers, which is a real shame as I think all Log Cabins need roof shingles to become anything other than a crappy shed.

You’re buying a building that will last forever if cared for, surely you want a roof material that will do the same?

As an example, here’s a shed roof with felt:

Shed felt roof - Horrible isn't it!

Shed felt roof – Horrible isn’t it!

This is what is supplied as standard with all log cabins these days.  It’s ordinary shed felt and as such it doesn’t look nice at all.  Try applying this to a pyramid roof or a roof over 3m in length, it’s horrible and impossible to make it look nice, more than likely you’ll end up ripping it as well, you’ll see the roofing nails and anything more than about 3m you’ll end up with ripples and bubbles in it.

This is a picture of shingled roof a customer proudly sent us:

Log cabin with roof shingles

Log cabin with roof shingles

It looks so much better, it turns a ‘Shed’ in to a proper garden building.  It also lasts for years, no nails can be seen, no ripples and no rips and of course you won’t have to do it again in a couple of years time.

Here’s a few pictures of my own log cabin, it sits directly under trees and has taken years of abuse, I’ve never cleaned the roof or carried out any maintenance (as I wonder what will happen eventually) and it’s still as water tight as it’s ever been

Old felt shingled log cabin

Old felt shingled log cabin

Here’s another view of the poor thing:

An old log cabin shingled roof

An old log cabin shingled roof covered in moss, algae and bird droppings.

This building is very old now as you can see but the tiles are still going strong.  An ordinary felt roof would need replacing after about two – three years, less if it had trees over it like my old log cabin.

Standard Roof Shingles

Within our catalogue and drop down lists on all the cabins we have shingles that can be selected in a variety of colours, most of which can be available in straight, hexagonal or curved style.  you can also see our roofing materials in the category:  Roofing for Log Cabins.  These are all manufactured by a company called IKO who enjoy world renowned success and unrivalled quality, you really can’t get better than these, if you watch the movies you’ll see them on all the American houses as they love their felt shingles.

Roofing options

I’ve hated the fact that we sell buildings with ordinary felt, in fact a colleague tells me “she shudders” when a customer buys a log cabin without them, to tell you the truth I do as well as felt really does spoil what should be a stunning building.

It also saddens me when a customer calls up and asks for shingles saying: “they should have ordered them with the building“, which, they should have and we try to encourage them to but some customers think we’re trying to up-sell and refuse at the time of order.

It’s then upsetting for them and us when we can’t offer them at the price on the web page as those prices are calculated taking the standard felt away and no delivery charges as they are priced to go with the cabin.  When we then have to charge them higher prices due to delivery and no removal of the felt costs they get a bit miffed and disappointed.

Normal prices of felt shingles can be seen in the roofing category.  It’s not good for either of us to be disappointed so please think about shingles with your order, we’re not up-selling we’re making an honest recommendation.

Now the good bit …..

FREE Offer Roof Shingles

I’m going to go back to the old days of log cabins and offer FREE shingles with all our log cabins AND the prices of the buildings aren’t going to go up either unless the Euro exchange rate forces us to or a promotion ends.  The point is our FREE offer shingles aren’t going to impact on the prices.

Tuin is pretty big and we have come up with a solution so we don’t have to send you the dreaded standard roofing felt. All our old stock, last years colours, shingles in damaged packaging etc are all sitting around and aren’t sell-able as a brand new product.  Normally we will sell these in bulk to shed manufacturing companies when they ask for them. Instead of selling these to the trade we’re going to keep them and are now offering them FREE with all our log cabins and shed manufacturers are going to be a little peeved with us.

There is a tiny catch though

I really do wish we could get back to the old days of a log cabin inclusive of shingles and you simply choose a colour.  But, the shingles are expensive things, an average log cabin is 18 sq.m  a packet of shingles covers 3 m.sq.  That’s an average of 6 packs of shingles with an average cost of about £180.  Some people don’t want to pay the extra £180 on a building and who can blame them if they are happy with roofing felt (uuurrrgh)

So, we’re going to give you the Offer shingles FREE on all the log cabins but the catch is we get to choose what style (straight, curved or Hexagonal) and what colour we send to you without charging you for them.  This is because we don’t know what we have / will have of the offer shingles at any one time until we allocate them to an order.

I hope you don’t mind?  There’s got to be a trade off and you’re getting the shingles for free.  Of course after placing an order we will email you the colour we are sending and if you don’t like it you can opt for the standard roofing felt.

Alternatively you can choose a colour and style of your choice from this season ranges using the drop down menu on each of the log cabin product pages so you know exactly what you’re getting.  You’ll find all our shingle prices better than any competitor anyway!

Competitors

I don’t know of any supplier / manufacturer / retailer who can even get close to this offer. Have you found anyone who can offer shingles at our prices, even the standard ones? Let alone FREE shingles! OK, after a search I did find one supplier but the price of the cabins are far too expensive to worry us about.

Old days of Log Cabins

Well, we’re almost back to the old days.  At least now we can sell cabins with shingles again and still be the most highly competitive supplier there is in the UK.

Please understand though we may not be able to keep this up all the time so we do reserve the right to stop the offer when stocks are depleted and this will generally be without much notice at all so please don’t shout at us if you suddenly see the offer has been withdrawn on the log cabin you have been thinking about for a little while.

Before you ask, we’re really sorry but when it ends it ends and we can’t offer them retrospectively.  This is much like all our offers.  We are honest and always will be if it’s offered please take it.  When it’s gone it’s gone.

Felt shingles roof on our Stuttgart log cabin

Felt shingles roof on our Asmund log cabin.  The proper way a log cabin should look.

Installation of Shingles on an Apex or Pyramid roof videos

Further information on roof shingles and the market: Roof Shingles for Log Cabins.

Pent Installation Roof Advice

A little insight to how you can format the parts of our Modern log cabins

So you have built up your new log cabin up to roof height and you will come across a sight like the one below, the skeleton of a roof ready to be finished off.

Up to roof height with purlins added

I have made a quick guide which I hope proves useful, there are different methods in doing this roof style that you may prefer to use.

Firstly lets identify all the roof components that we will eventually call upon, in this case we have the two-tiered eaves boards for all four sides, squared battens and a mixture of mounting slats and blocks, sometimes the eaves boards for the longer cabins arrive in half lengths which when offered up to one another span the full required length. 

Identifying Roof Components

A good opportunity is often missed at this stage which is treatment and plenty of it as a lot of these parts become very inaccessible once you get further along, for more guidance on what treatments to use you may be interested in the following; https://www.tuin.co.uk/blog/log-cabin-treatment-again/

To begin with let us install the mounting blocks on the front and back of this particular log cabin, these provide more support for the eaves boards when you fit them, sometimes these blocks can be fitted to the sides instead, depending on the model, to fix these I am going to use a two of the 60mm screws at each point.

Starting to install the mounting blocks

Please do not think too long and hard where the mounting blocks need to be placed, as if the plans in front of you do not show a specific precise location, as the eaves boards may have arrived disassembled as shown in the second image above, just place them in a realistic fashion and copy the same for the back.

Mounting blocks also fitted to the back wall

The mounting blocks have all been fitted, so now it is time to think about making up the eaves boards, in this case we have been supplied with a narrow and a wider board, these two together make up the full eaves height, you may have seen that the plans are telling me to use the wider boards on the top, so let us do just that.

Eaves boards ready to be assembled

To join the two boards together we need to use the mounting slats supplied in the kit and identified earlier, anything can be used including spare pallet timber.
Please pilot drill these before securing them, by doing this with any wood you can be more sure that the wood will not split or crack, make sure their locations are correct, use the roof as a guide lining up the slats with the blocks already in place or take measurements.

Offering Eaves boards up to the fitted block locations to aid positioning

Screw the mounting slats all onto one side of the boards, I used 30mm screws which worked nicely.

Screws sent though the mounting slats into the eaves boards

Mounting slats lining up with mounting blocks and overhanging the wall logs/purlins.

Mounting slats lining up with mounting blocks

Now we have all the eaves boards made up as well as all mounting blocks and slats fitted, we then need to think about how we want the chosen roof material to be formatted.Roofing Felt, Easy Roofing or EPDM

Felt, Easy roofing and EPDM Roofing for our pent roofed log cabins

Fitting roofing felt, Our aim is to fold this under the roof edge on all four sides of the roof securing it into place using the supplied battens or sourced trims.

Fitting Easy Roofing ( ERM ) this is an easier solution to roofing felt and requires no nails as its all self adhesive, A heat gun in the colder months of the year is suggested to enhance the overlaps

Fitting EPDM now we save the best until last! The Epdm rubber roof, supplied with a spray adhesive and laid straight onto a “clean dust free roof”, like with the easy roof you would dish this up on the inside faces of the eaves boards on all four sides or just the front three

FELT ROOFING FIRST

We do have a video showing how felt in general is laid which for the basic principle is important as well as our very detailed online installation manual for pretty much everything you would need to know about getting the cabin constructed from the ground up; https://www.tuin.co.uk/blog/tuin-tuindeco-log-cabins-instruction-manual/

but more specifically here for a pent roofs which we hope helps further.

Assuming it is felt that we are fitting today we need to get the roof boards on before anything else, However what we like to suggest at this stage is to temporally tac your front eaves on first as this then gives you a line to offer them all up against knowing they will be correct.

Eaves boards fixed to the blocks ready for the roof boards

You may find that the mounting slats obstruct some of the roof boards from sitting flush so I am trimming them down, or I could have trimmed the relevant roof boards instead to slot around them.

Cutting the mounting slats so the roof boards fit flush, The roof boards could be trimmed instead where required

With the slats trimmed the roof boards sit flush against the inside face

When you go to fit the last roof board you nearly always need to rip it down to allow it to sit flush with the ends of the purlin(s)

Remember to use two nails or screws per board at every junction as the roof boards are key to strengthening the whole building, in the summer leave a 2mm gap
in-between each board whereas in the winter you close them up as tight as possible.

After that you can then remove the front eaves board as its time to fit the felt.

As mentioned, we really want to get the felt wrapped round the ends of the roof boards and under, most cabins come with battens to attach the felt under the boards, in this instance I have been supplied with the two long lengths as shown in a previous picture, I will use these and any other spare pallet timber to secure the felt if needed.

An example of how to finish the roofing felt around the ends of the roof boards

Another example showing how to overcome obstructions

You will at points have to work your way around the mounting blocks, purlins or wall logs, you could remove the blocks temporally while the felt is fitted. you can also leave the felt simply wrapped round the sides of the roof boards to avoid the obstacles but just be sure they are secured down in some way either using Felt Glue or clout nails, Ideally both.

After the felt is fully installed you can then fit all your eaves boards around all sides, the natural gap at the back is there to allow the water to drain off the roof

Expect a gap at the back of the roof, This is for drainage

EPDM or ERM Rubber Roofing

For more specific guidance on the actual installation of the rubber itself, Please visit the following for support and advice

https://www.tuin.co.uk/Easy-Roofing-Membrane.html

EPDM on LOG CABINS roofs.

For this cabin we opted for the Easy roofing as it is the best with no overlaps, the same fitting aid also applies for the Easy roofing, for these rubber options I am going to dish the roofing up on the front three sides then wrap it around the back to allow the run off.

After the initial stage of fixing all mounting blocks onto the cabin I am going to go ahead and fix all four completed eaves boards onto the sides of the roof.

A close up of a corner, Mounting slats cut and uncut as preferred

An extra pair of hands is useful for this part, but you could use clamps if you have some large enough. I screwed through the outside fascia of the eaves boards through the mounting slat into the mounting block with two 70mm screws at each point.

Eaves boards fitted at the back, Note they sit higher than those at the front due to the roof pitch

All eaves boards in place and ready for roof boards followed by the EPDM roofing

With them all fitted to the perimeter of the roof I’m ready to fit the roof boards following the same process as we did for the felt part of the guide.

Dishing of the rubber roofing can be formatted in different ways, As an example you can just have the rubber coming upwards against the inside face and apply a hidden trim to cap it off, however it is best to actually wrap the rubber around the top of the eaves board and down the other side as it helps prevent any possible ingress under it, you can then cap this off as you wish.

You may like to cut the mounting slats down on the front three sides like we did for the felt approach early as this makes offering the Epdm rubber roof easier to lay on the inside face of the boards.

Roof boards start getting laid, Remember two nails per board at every junction

Examples of how the rubber roofing can be dished up

Then for the back where the natural drainage gap is we are going to wrap it around the side of the roof boards, Some fitters at this point will actually make cuts into the tops of the blocks so they can get the EPDM wrapped further around, But you can just glue and tac the roofing to the sides

Some fitters will be very clever at this stage and actually cut a channel into the tops of the mounting blocks, eventually fitting a guttering length directing the water into a downpipe, you may need to increase the wood size of the block used depending on the gutter size, you can then glue the EPDM into the inner face of the gutter instead.

With a channel cut on the back overhangs you can fit a guttering length rigged up to a downpipe

I will mention once again that the methods above do not have to be strictly followed, “like anything in this world there are always room for enhancements!. “So fill your boots ladies and gents” and have a go. Any questions please feel free to contact us for advice

Jos Log Cabin Customer Review

Hi everyone!

It’s getting closer to the end of the year – But it’s great to see customers who are still installing their Log Cabins, even with the temperamental weather in the UK. For example Mr M – Who has very kindly sent in some pictures of their Jos Log Cabin installation, which has been transferred into a cosy Gin Hut!


Mr M writes as follows:

The Jos Log Cabin, Safely Delivered

The arrival of my Jos corner cabin. Delivered by friendly/skilled forklift driver who even managed to unload into the garage. Worth taking the time to check off the materials list prior to assembly. We’ll protected packaging with materials to spare. (Note – We recommend this within our T&C too!)

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These rot proof packers are worth considering and helped me out greatly throughout my build. After spending great effort ensuring a near level slab base I still used these packers to take up any gap such as the slight skirting to slab edging. I would always recommend a wet mix of sand and cement rather than dry.

Log Cabin Foundation Beams

Use a DPM under the foundation beams for further protection

Then I cut and filed down the tongue. Screw fixing of first wall panels. 2 per board is an ample amount, screwing them approx 150mm from ends .From this point assembly is quick. I clear coated all tongue and grooves throughout. Note the space which I left for required annual wood preserving. This is essential in prolonging the life of your cabin. Don’t be tempted to squeeze into a corner to maximise space!

Jos Log Cabin Installation

Build coming along, wood preserving as I went. This helps maintain the cabin colour from expected expansion/contraction movement particularly in 1st seasonal settlement. Note the upside down section of door frame top. My tip and is best practiced throughout construction – place prior to securing. This was easily corrected later in the build and then squared and secured.

Installing the Jos Log Cabin

Time for the roof. The roofing timber was less awkward than expected, beams to kingpin are pre-angle cut- a job made easier with another pair of hands. I chose to add further protection by stapling in more DPM sheeting prior to shingles. I also decided to use the 75mm board from delivery pallet rather than the 40mm barge boards supplied. I reckon it is better proportioned to the final look of the roof. Time spent on the double angle cut where boards meet. Cut with green and trial fit to achieve best fit.

Installing the Jos Log Cabin Roof

Shingles on! Choose a dry day so as not to trap moisture and preferably a day warm enough to bond the bitumen strip. Watching the pyramid roof shingles video Tuin provide was particular helpful.

Pyramid Roof Shingles

I decided to further weather seal the foundation by adding folded sheet metal. This was bonded to slab using sikaflex EBT external sealant then primed and oil base coated.

Metal Foundation Cover

Floor time! More DPM sheeting and floor joists approx 300mm apart. Note more use of glazier packers to help level out the base.

Jos Log Cabin Floor Joists

You could also use off cuts of shingles if required.

Jablite boarding to help insulate underfoot… I purchased the optional 27mm flooring. Ensure the flooring is nailed tight with approx 10mm gap all around acting as a floating floor.

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The window latches were installed with more glazier packers to help centralise to frame. Off setting the second pin was another helpful tip from Tuin to add better seal when window in closed position.

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Personalised wee gin den! I also picked up from previous customer review about finishing above the door with edging. A nice finishing touch.

Gin Pub Sign

A great way to lay the rules straight for gin.

Project complete. So happy with the cabin Tuin supplied. I decided to go with a preserver which was in keeping with our house. There are some lovely new colour choices in wood preserving but I opted for the more traditional look showing the beauty in natural wood, knots n’ all.

The Completed Jos Log Cabin

Don’t be frightened to have a go, and don’t rush your build, enjoy it! Some reviews mention about done in 2 days etc… Yes you can assemble quick but my advice is to allow for several good quality preserving coats remembering to take into account drying times and unpredictable weather. Protect as you go and don’t feel rushed into completing.

I hope this review gives you some useful pointers and demonstrates the well built garden spaces Tuin provide. Well done Tuin for having such a fantastic range of product and very reasonably priced. Your product deserves the time and feedback to allow you continued success within your field.

… Now time to enjoy our new space with a gin or few!


Some very handy tips in this review, I love the sign above the cabin door! The end product shows how perfectly the Jos Log Cabin can become a cosy Gin Hut for two, truly marvelous! Thank you again for sending this in.

Interested in more reviews like Mr M’s? You can find more with a range of cabins at: Tuin Pictorial Customer Reviews.

Preparing Your Log Cabin For The Winter

Hello everyone!

I’m sure you’ve noticed right now, but winter is coming, which for the UK means plenty of cold mornings, rain and, if we’re lucky, some snow. I feel like most people would love to just stay at home in a cosy room all day when it comes to winter, almost like hibernation, and one way you can find your area of peace and warmth is within your Log Cabin.

But before we continue, this post will be about the interior decor of a Log Cabin- If you want a building that will suffice through the groggy weather than you will need to be prepared. We recommend for all year around use at least a 40mm Log Cabin should be considered, although when thinking of logs it’s all about the heat capacity. So for a slightly more expensive cabin, such as our 58mm Log Cabins or 70mm Log Cabins, you would save money in the long run when it comes to heating and keeping the heat in the building. Insulating your Log Cabin will also aid greatly when it comes to keeping warm in the colder months.

We also highly recommend that you learn about expansion in Log Cabins and how timber naturally acts within the damper months. Although the process of expansion is normal for timber, there are a few ways that you can help prevent this, this especially includes treating your Log Cabin correctly, with the most suitable products for timber buildings.

Now, let’s say that you have/are getting a Log Cabin, and are all ready for the winter months. What else could you do to build that warm and cosy sanctuary you envisioned? The rest of this blog should help inspire you on how to complete the interior of your Log Cabin.

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Many of our customers use a woodburner to provide heat into their Log Cabins, and it’s a great idea! So long as it’s installed correctly, so if you are thinking of installing one please use a qualified installer in the process. The important things to consider is the natural expansion and contraction of the log cabin and that the flue needs to accommodate this without restrictions.

If the idea of wood burners within a wooden building concerns you – Why not try out an electric heater? A electrical convection heater is known to be enough to heat a Log Cabin, a great example is shown within our Emma Log Cabin.

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Another example is this Piet Log Cabin that has been turned into extra accomodation, it just oozes with comfort- Complete with a bathroom, small kitchen area and a double bed, all of which are kept warm with the use of an electrical convection heater. These two cabins also have another common feature – Fluffy blankets, they are truly a winter necessity.

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There is a large selection of cabins that have plenty of room for a double bed, maybe even a queen sized? One of them being the Henning Log Cabin, this example also features windowsill plants – A nice but subtle way to become more in touch with nature.

The Henning Log Cabin

The windows across the front and side of the cabin allows plenty of natural light to be let in, further building the homely atmosphere this cabin provides.

With the use of additional logs that match your Log Cabin, or the use of cladded panels, there’s not much to stop you taking our standard kits and customising them to your preference. As shown with the Piet above and also with this 45mm Hendrick Log Cabin.

Measuring at 5m x 5m, there’s plenty of ‘play room’ for you to add internal walls giving users of the cabin their own privacy when it’s needed, especially when it comes to the bathroom. You may not think that 5m x 5m is that big, but you will be surprised at this example of the Hendrick- Featuring a bedroom, bathroom and kitchen.

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Prefer sleeping higher than the usual bed? The Berlin Log Cabin features an upper level that’s just right to put a bed in and the bare necessities- I love the little window on this upper level, could you imagine being able to look at the sky so easily while you’re in bed?

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Did you know that we have a few buildings for these moments in mind? For example the Camping Barrel, to help you sleep in style or work in comfort. Featuring two separate rooms to help you keep what you need, in the area you need it in.

Log Cabin Camping Barrel

It also seems that this owner put the bed in a higher position in order to gain some extra storage space. A brilliant idea

I realise as I’m typing this, not everyone likes to spend all of their days in bed, but a seating area can still be inviting and cosy. For example, this colourful Blackpool Log Cabin:

Blackpool Log Cabin Office

Used as an office/study, these customers used contrasting colours to help brighten up the inside of their Blackpool cabin- With the blankets, cushions ready to be used for the winter.

Another colourful example is this Yorick Log Cabin, with the feature length windows giving in plenty of natural light, the light is also used to make the cushions on this corner sofa stand out! Not to mention that the sofa does look perfect for a social evening. Monopoly with a cuppa, anyone?

Yorick Garden Office Log Cabin

Corner sofas really are a great way to utilise space in your cabin, and sometimes (especially for smaller cabins) less is more. For example this Daisy Log Cabin, featuring just the necessities for a lovely evening.

Daisy Log Cabin

The colour scheme for this cabin is also a wise choice, the wider wall colour will help add more visual space.

… Is it too early to mention Christmas?

Yorick Garden Office Log Cabin

Hear me out though, a sofa, table and a bar?! That is some impressive space utilisation.

Another beautifully made seating/study area is this Ukrik Log Cabin, that contradicts the earlier posts – Soft interior works too! It’s all about finding a colour scheme that suits your tastes, as well as finding enough chairs to get everyone in, since we’ve proven that space won’t be a problem for some of these cabins.

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And of course, what would be a post by myself if it didn’t include a Shepherds Hut or two? It’s one of the main reasons why I love these so much, even though they look plain and simple on the outside, there are so many ways in which you can transform a Shepherds Hut! The majority of these examples are from our Gypsy Caravan model.

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A Log Cabin can easily be turned into a cosy area with a few things. Of course, there is making sure you are prepared for when log cabin expansion naturally occurs, along with having the most suitable log thickness and insulation for the job. Once the fundamentals are down, then you can start playing with a colour scheme that reflects you and your personality, picking the heating source you’d prefer and of course, finding all of the fluffy blankets and cushions that you can.

How are you preparing for the winter? We’d love to learn how in the comments below!

Shepherds Hut Deluxe Review

Hi everyone – It’s been some time, hasn’t it?

Now that the seasons are changing it’s starting to get quieter for this industry, but we do still have customers installing their cabins! For example, Mr M’s installation of their Shepherds Hut Deluxe to which he kindly sent in some images along with some commentary and tips for future installers.


Mr M writes as follows: 

A stable-full of beams and panels. Get it all under cover if possible. We started off by completing the base after correcting the three warped centre joists with modded joist hangers.  Note the bases – just paving slabs laid on a bed of sand.  Nearest is a thicker cast concrete slab also laid on sand to correct for the slope away from the wall.

Shepherd Hut Deluxe Base

Extra joist hangers were needed to correct 20 degree warp in the beam. Tuin supply 18 but you will need 10 or 12 more if your beams are not straight. Ours were cut-down joist hangers (they are only twisted plates) – not brilliant quality but good enough.  Not sure if Tuin could sell you more of the real thing, I didn’t ask. (Note: We do sell joist hangers)

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This is by far the most tedious part of the build

Shepherd Hut Deluxe - Staining

Apply preservative and stain/paint as many parts as practicable before assembly – pay particular attention to the end grain.

Flooring goes on late into the evening    note two teenage helpers; almost as essential as the tea and hammers. Also note the clamps – you will need them. We are using cut-clasp nails.  You will need roughly three packs – 14 nails in each board.  It may sound overkill but it makes the base really secure, better safe than sorry.

Shepherd Hut Deluxe Flooring

Sides are on in the next image, as are the steps and the door hinge beams. Pay close attention to getting the hinge beams vertical in all planes prior to the roof going on or the doors will be skew-whiff.

Shepherd Hut Deluxe Walls

The roof and doors are on the next picture, I did the doors first as the roof will get in the way.  The roof is easier than expected, just keep it all tight at first with your sash cramps to keep it nice and square.  This is a month or so after the previous pic – I fell off our original step ladder adding the first feather roof beam and cracked a rib.  Highly recommended replacement cherry-picker ladder featured!

Shepherd Hut Deluxe Doors

The completed hut.  Looks good doesn’t it? The picture was taken after first frosts of the autumn (October 5th). I haven’t added the eight end roof arcs yet. We plan to add a wriggly tin roof eventually, and the roof arcs will finish that off nicely. 

Note replacement glass fibre reinforced felt laid across the arc – there are six pieces all glued and clout-nailed with the overlap away from the prevailing wind – important in Highland Perthshire! Laying it this way uses less felt and we think looks better than length-wise. It is certainly easier to do as it has no tendency to want to slide off. I suggest that you check YouTube shed covering videos which show a proper drip edge rather than wrap the covering round the roof edge as the instructions show – that will encourage the rain water to travel up to the sides of the hut via capillary action and you don’t want that. 

The completed Shepherds Hut Deluxe


Some very handy tips in this review, though we are sorry to hear about your step ladder incident – I hope it healed nicely! The end product shows how perfectly the Shepherds Hut Deluxe fits in with its surrounding garden, truly marvelous! Thank you again for sending this in.

Interested in more reviews like Mr M’s? You can find more with a range of cabins at: Tuin Pictorial Customer Reviews.

Gijs Log Cabin Customer Review

Hi everyone,

The heatwave continues to beat our expectations – And so do our customers! Installing their Log Cabins in this heat, determined to see the finishing result. For example, Mr S’ installation of their Gijs Log Cabin. With plenty of pictures to back up his words, but need I say more? Lets read what Mr S has to day about our Log Cabins.


Mr S writes as follows:

I chose to buy the Gijs from Tuin for a few reasons, I’ll list them in case it helps anyone else.

  •  Design – loved the size of Gijs with the overhanging canopy
  • Value – You get a lot for your money and the free shingles offer was great
  • Floor – I wanted to do my own thing and they didn’t force me to buy one from them
  • Website – I love all the reviews, advice, blog, instructions etc on the website. By far better than anyone else in this market.
  • Service – They look like a company that cares about their customers. They do, I have been very impressed.

I wasn’t disappointed and would thoroughly recommend this cabin.

I thought I would contribute to the website by offering my thoughts on the build process, and some photos. I hope someone finds this interesting or useful.

Foundations

I have a sloping area at the back of my garden where the cabin was going. I really didn’t like the idea or expense of excavating and laying a concrete slab so having read the website advice and doing some other homework decided to use pads with a wooden framework on top. I also wanted to install a decking area under the canopy so the foundations I needed were almost 6m x 6m.

Gijs Log Cabin Base

I used 2 different kinds of pads. 6 of them (4 corners of the cabin plus middle of the front and back walls) were excavated to about 30cm deep by 50cm square, then filled with concrete. I then sank a couple of those hollow construction bricks into the concrete and filled the holes with concrete. The other pads (about 16 of them) were expected to take less load, so I made these by laying some sharp sand and placing a concrete paving slab on the sand, then building up from there using dense concrete bricks. I didn’t bother using mortar – I’m no brickie and my builder friend said they would be fine! If you are using a similar method I strongly recommend taking time to ensure they are all level, it saves a lot of time and hassle later on.

After this I put a layer of weed suppressing cloth down so hopefully nothing will grow underneath.

Gijs Log Cabin Base

I then built the frame using treated 2 x 6″ timber from the builders merchant. I put a double thickness on the edges where the cabin walls would be. Possibly overkill but I like things to be solid. I needed to use a few wedges here and there to make sure there was contact between all points on the frame and the pad foundations. At this stage I also build the frame for the stairs that will lead up to the deck.

I am a relatively keen DIYer and found the foundation stage hard work physically, but quite rewarding. I haven’t built any foundations before, and had to put up with some sass from my builder friend who thought I’d over-engineered everything. He may be right.

Cabin Build

I have helped a friend build a similar cabin so knew roughly what to expect. First stage was delivery.

Log Cabin Delivery

Unfortunately my drive is too narrow for the fork-lift which is 3.8m wide so we had to leave it on the road. The driver was very helpful and the communication about delivery dates and times excellent. Unfortunately this left me with the task of shifting everything to the back of my garden quickly before I got a parking ticket. Fortunately my son had just finished his GCSEs and was willing to help – for some pocket money…

I made one mistake at this stage. I stacked everything horizontally at the bottom of the garden except the doors, which I stood in the house for a couple of days before the build. It was only after they warped that I read the advice on storing them flat. Store them flat!

The build is really straight forward if there are two of you – more pocket money for my son. Some of the wall pieces were hard to get in due to warping but could be fixed with some clamping and hammering as advised in the build video.

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We had the walls and about 1/3 of the roof completed on the first day. Be very careful of the ends of the apex pieces. They are held on by a very thin strip of wood and break easily. I broke two of them off. It didn’t make a difference to the build and I was able to stick them back in place for the cosmetic look after it was finished. One problem I had was getting the purlins to sit flush with the walls. Mine were a bit warped and didn’t sit all the way down. The website advises getting a plane out, but I wasn’t too happy about that. I ended up coming up with my own solution of laying draught excluder tape along the front and back walls so that when I added the roof beams, it closed all the gaps. There’s certainly a better solution to this, but it seemed to work for me.

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Roof

Finishing the roof seemed to take ages, but I was very glad I owned a nail gun. Mine’s a weedy electric one so I alternated between the proper clout nails and my nail gun to make sure it was solid. I then cracked on with laying the roof shingles. Again I found this quite straight forward, just a little time consuming.

I decided against insulating the roof because I’ll mainly be using the cabin as a workshop and I don’t get cold easily. What I didn’t consider however is heat! We’re in the middle of the 2018 heat wave and the black shingles act like a giant radiator – the roof is hot to the touch on the inside. Maybe next time I might put a layer of insulation up there.

Gijs Shingle Installation

Floor

I did decide to insulate the floor. I cut OSB board to hang between the joist then cut up sheets of expanded polythene to fit into the voids. Over that went a layer of plywood screwed to the joists, then an engineered wood oak floor that clipped together really easily. It looks lovely.

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Finishing

After quite a few test pots we finally opted to use Sikkens HLS (1 coat) and Sikkens Cetol 7 (2 coats) in light oak. It has a slight gloss/silk sheen to it which I like but won’t appeal to everyone.

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Final thoughts 

An excellent product from Tuin at a very reasonable price. The quality of the boards was excellent with a handful of warped ones. Service, before during and after has been outstanding and I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend Tuin or this cabin. If I were to do anything different in the build process I would spend more time getting the foundation pads exactly in the right place, square and level. A couple of mistakes cost me some time and headaches later in the build (including the use of a car jack to lift one corner up while I put in some shims!). Best of luck with your builds!


A very appropriate treatment choice for this Gijs Log Cabin and a beautiful setting to pair with it! Thank you to Mr S for sending in their honest review of their experience with installing their Log Cabin.

Interested in more reviews like Mr S’? You can find a load more at: Tuin Pictorial Customer Reviews.

Log Cabin Hot Tub Covers

Hello everyone!

Due to the popularity of our recent Log Cabin Pubs blog post, I decided to continue with this concept as a sort of series- Showing some of the main ways that our customers have used their Log Cabin for.

This example being, as the title suggests, hot tub covers! Hot tubs have had increased popularity over the past couple of years after seeing our western neighbours use them as one of the ultimate relaxation must haves – Though of course, we don’t want to be sunburnt in the process.. Nor wanting to clean out all of the leaves that will land in everyday, hence why a lot of our customers have found our products as the ideal solution.

Some examples include:

This is our Rianne log cabin.The 2.5m gazebo is a perfect for size for you hot tub while the having the cabin dimensions of 2.5m x 2.5m that can be used for a range of purposes including: garden pubs, summer house or as general storage.

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This is our Syros Gazebo made from untreated larch, meaning that it will weather through time similar to how oak does; however if you want to preserve the rich colour of larch then you can treat it with products such as our Carefree product, this can help protect the wood from the elements of nature.

This Syros has been shown to be used for a hot tub cover that will be a stylish and an effective solution. The addition of shingles that can give it a rustic look that cannot be said for plain roofing felt, not to mention the longitivtiy of your Gazebo and it’s roof.Syros-Hot-TubA cheaper alternative for the Syros Larch Gazebo is this Wooden Pergola. This is smaller but can be use-full for those smaller areas around your garden, at 3m x 3m pergola you still have plenty of room for your hot tub. Due to the roof material being polyethylene, we would recommend to use this as a temporary/seasonal solution, due to the pergola being less structurally stable compared to our gazebos.


Pergola-Hot-Tub
The Marit Log Cabin Gazebo (4m x 4m) is similar in size to the Syros, however, you can gain some privacy and peace of mind with the additional walls, depending on where you position the Marit gazebo- You can also benefit from the additional protection of the side walls from the wind and potential rain.

Marit-Hot-Tub-GazeboThese pictures are of the Barbara Log Cabin Gazebo which is 3.5m x 3.5m that can, just like our other Gazebo’s and the pergola, be converted into a perfect hot tub cover. This Gazebo is like the Marit, however, this Gazebo has a flat roof that many people can think of as more modern and stylish.

This style also benefits from a low log cabin height, which is ideal to be able to install this without the need of planning permission (always check with your local council). The feature of the side walls, like within the Marit, can give you more privacy.

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This is our Jutka Gazebo which benefits from two side canopies which increases usability, as demonstrated with the hot tub and the sitting area, perfect place for a get-together, party or even just for your own personal getaway for the upcoming summer. The overall size being 6.78m x 6.78m make this an ultimate garden must have, all while being stylish (watch out for the jealous neighbours though!)

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This Elburg Log Cabin is bespoke within this picture, with the addition of the extra doors on the gazebo side of the building. The Elburg normally only have them on one side, however that small factor doesn’t stop anyone from adding them in order to increase the usability potential: this could be as a hot tub cover as shown as below, a summerhouse with outdoor dining as well as a general storage use.Elburg-Log-CabinThese two hot tubs images are from the Mega modern log cabin which measures at 5.75m x 3m which makes it almost ideal for your hot tub, if you’re quiet you could probably hear it calling to be used for a hot tub cover/storage.

A factor that is nice about this is that, like many others it has an outdoor area, however due to the mega moderns size, its proven to be ideal for the end of your garden, a secret get away for the summer. It also makes a nice change from having a hot tub under the gazebo, allowing you to use it during other seasons.

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The Annette Corner Log Cabin is another product with a modern design. This log cabin is 7m x 4m making it a good size for those slightly larger gardens, and every slightly larger garden needs one thing… a hot tub! As luck would have it, this desirable timber structure can easily be the hot tub cover that you need.

Another bonus to the list is that, unlike most other log cabins like this one, the side porch area has extended out the front giving you a nice affect that follows the typical southern houses with the the porch out of the front, just think of the possibilities…Annete-CoverThis final picture is of the Rosenheim Log Cabin which, like the others has been converted into a cosy hot tub cover that looks like it could be the beginning of a brilliant time, the log cabins size of 3.8m x 3.8m is comfortable for most average sized hot tubs and can fit in most gardens, its style can make it look like its a small old fashioned house that would fit in almost anywhere.

The lighting to this Rosenheim Log Cabin is what really pulls this all together, setting the mood to a romantic and relaxing one. Perfect for those with a stressful lifestyle- Just go into your garden and enter your Cabin of relaxation.
Rosenheim-Blog-Interior

This Tourist Gazebo has been adapted and transformed into a hot tub and bar area, reminds me of the swimming pools in Cuban resorts, where you can swim to the bar…

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As well as this Meaghan Log Cabin, freshly installed. The Meaghan Log Cabin measures to 4.5m x 4.5m, the ideal size for a hot tub enclosure – And the positioning of the roof skylights are just perfect. Allowing you to look up at the stars without getting so cold in the night.

This Ben Clockhouse Log Cabin has definitely proved that a cabin can serve multiple uses- Which has turned into the ultimate social location, with a hot tub placed under the canopy and the enclosed cabin being used for a garden pub:

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These are just a handful of the images our amazing customers send us, if you liked viewing these- Follow our FacebookTwitter and Instagram pages we also have plenty of boards on the Tuin Pinterest page.

If you’re not looking for a hot tub cover, there are plenty of other ways to utilise a Log Cabin, see our Log Cabin Pubs post for a collection of how our customers have transformed their Log Cabins into a garden pub. Out  Uses Of A Log Cabin post can also provide plenty of inspiration!