Lennart Log Cabin Show Site Build

Hello everyone,

So as you may or may not know, I (Megan), haven’t been a member of Tuin for very long- which means that my knowledge of Log Cabins and installing them are limited to the posts I’ve read made by Richard.

He often mentions about how easy it is to install a log cabin but honestly, I thought it was mostly him talking from experience so when I was asked to capture the new show site buildings being installed- I decided to take this opportunity to learn as much as I could to improve my blogs and hopefully show you how I have evolved from a DIY newbie to a little less of a newbie. I’m considering of making this a series of all the new show site buildings that will be installed in the upcoming months, maybe we should call it ‘Megan learns some things’ or ‘From DIY newbie to not so newbie’. Obviously those titles are very bad, maybe you could leave a comment for your ideas below.

And also I must disclose, I am not a physical/manual labour type of girl. So my report on this will be through watching the installs, not partaking in them.

So, to get things started… 

The first new Log Cabin on the Show Site will be an updated Lennart Log Cabin to replace the previous one, we’ve even managed to persuade one of our apprentice sales assistants Andrew to join in with the installation, as this will be a great learning experience for him too.

Now, Andrew and I are very similar.. Both at the age of 18 with little DIY experience and always on a keyboard, we were definitely are out of our comfort zone.. Wish us luck!

Lennart Installation Plans

Now Andrew started off confident with this project, with the help of our two experienced servicemen we were confident that the Lennart will be installed by the end of the day! With the base already been made from the previous Lennart, it started off smoothly with Andrew going around in a square to fit in the wall logs.

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With only minor mistakes (such as almost putting in one of the incorrect logs at the front of the building till he soon figured afterwards why I was giggling on the sideline) he was doing well! Maybe he would of been better and avoided this by frequently referring to the Log Cabin plans. Though unfortunately our experienced men found this progress rather slow, so they soon started to help and the walls were quickly heightening.

Incorrect Log Example

If you looked at the log and looked at the plans.. That wouldn’t of happened..

As they reached seven logs (I believe) high, they installed the ‘half log’ for the window. Which turned out to be as simple as sliding the window into the grooves of the half log, when doing this I recommend to add a few of the smaller logs on either side of the designated gap to ensure that the window slid in straight, see below:

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Around about this time, Andrew began to structure the doorframe. Please note: That this actually was done the wrong way round (again, might of been avoided with the assistance of the Cabin plans..). Hopefully what I captured should explain what happened and how we resolved it, also take note of the captions of the images for more detail:

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With the doorframe in and a coffee consumed, it didn’t take long at all for the three guys to finish installing the walls of the Log Cabin, then straight onto the Apex. Now, admittedly I thought apex referred to a different material type, but it seems to be the triangular shape (in this case) that connects and supports the wall logs to the roof logs/purlins. Also, I have just been informed that I was likely getting it mixed up with perspex!

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As you can see above, the ‘slanted slots’ (as I call them) are cut out for the purlins on both sides, so all you will have to do is simply slide the purlins into both ended slots. We prefer to screw down the purlins into the apex for more security, it’s not strictly required.

Now… This is where things got repetitive (and slightly boring to watch). The guys then took the first roof board (for the overhang), ensured it was level and used the clout nails to secure the roof board at the top, middle and bottom of the board. Lining up to be nailed on the center purling, the middle/support purling and the cabin wall.

Lennart Overhang Roof Boards

Our roof boards are also made with interlocking timer, so its a fairly simple process to side the next roofboard in place, make sure its align with the previous one and nail it down. The interlocking process kind of reminds me of how you would install laminate flooring. Then you go onto the next one.. Than the next one.. Etc.

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For the last roof board there was a slight overhang, so to make it look neater we marked where the roof boards should finish and cut it to size using a circular saw.

Last Roof Board Adjustments

Then, you guessed it, you repeat with the other side! Admittedly, I left to continue to work in my warm office by the time this was happening. When I returned all of the roof boards were laid down and nailed- hurrah! We also added an edge/trim to the Lennart ready for the guttering to be installed fully leveled, this will happen after the cabin is treated.

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To finish off the body of the Log Cabin, Philip showed me how you would install doors for your Log Cabin. It seems to be a simple process of aligning the middle circular hinge in between the two already on the doorframe and pushing the provided pin in place. During this we had also noted that the door hinges appeared to look rusty, we apologise if this has happened to you. If you notice this on your Log Cabin Doors then please email us with pictures for reference, and our service team will send some new hinges for you to replace.

Double Door Installation

Then, came the monotonous part.. The one everyone tends to get bored of doing.. Fitting roof shingles. The shingles we used for the Lennart Log Cabin was our Red Hexagonal Shingles.  The process was long and I honestly spent most of it in the office, by the time I came downstairs to take this picture below, all enthusiasm and motivation from Andrew’s eyes were fading. He was tired, legs hurt (maybe after a few more show cabins he’ll be used to manual labour..) and was tired of lining up shingles. But it was all worth it in my opinion, by the end of the office day the Lennart was installed! And it looks stunning, amazing job guys!

Red Hexagonal Shingles

Over the next few days the Lennart Log Cabin will be coated with our Clear Carefree Protectant Treatment.

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I hope you enjoyed my view from this article on our new Lennart Log Cabin show building, and a big round of applause for Andrew who helped Wayne and Philip install this beautiful cabin. Let us know if you enjoyed this and wish to see more with our other future show site installs!

After watching this process, it really does seem that Richard wasnt oversimplifying the process- If you read and keep looking at the plans provided and read all of our pages for Fitting Log Cabins, it seems rather easy! Though it may get more complicated as the larger show buildings start to be installed.. And maybe if you yourself are carrying the logs and installing them.. I’ll keep you guys updated!

Again, I believe the process will be easier once you have read our Fitting Advice Pages.

You will also find more specific articles that may help when you look at the ‘Important Information’ tab on our Log Cabin pages.

There are also a few more showsite installation posts, like another one of mine with the Kennet Log Cabin as well as one written by our sales assistant in training, Becky helping with the Daisy Log Cabin and 28mm Storage Annexe!

If you enjoyed this post, you may like our other installation reviews sent in from our customers at: Pictorial Customer Reviews.

Lauren Clockhouse Log Cabin Review

One of our customers was very generous in sending a review of their Lauren Clock House Log Cabin (previously known as the Special Ben), with plenty of images to show you guys the installation progress! We do love receiving images here at Tuin, so thank you Mr F for sending this to us!


Mr F writes as follows:

We were both extremely impressed with the quality of the material and the thought and precision that had gone into the preparation of the kit of parts.

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The 1st of 3 packages arrives, expertly manoeuvred by Barry, the truck driver. Each load was 20ft long and weighed about 1.7tons. By the second image there was a total of 5 tons of shed. Due to a lack of planning on my part they were going to remain unwrapped for about 2 weeks as the ground work was completed.

Work starts on the base about 08.00hrs. Quite a bit of soil had to be removed to
give us a level area. A load of scalping is delivered to the pit, in all, 12 tons was used to form a base for the cement.

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Kharn, the builder, with his whacker plate consolidates the scalping and the
shuttering is leveled. We finished at 20.30hrs – a long day but the pressure was on as we had booked the ready mix lorry for 08.00hrs the next morning.

Leveled Out Shuttering

Impressive work in just one day Kharn!

Day 2 at 07.55hrs, 13 tons of cement arrives… A small dumper truck was used to bring the cement to the site and frantic tamping continued for over 2 hours until all appeared level – very hard work!

A couple of days later and with the concrete hardened the rear bank was ‘landscaped’ and a trench for gravel dug at the base.

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Monday, Day 1 of construction at about 08.00hrs. The lower beams had been treated the day before and the black items are lengths of the plastic base material. The walls progressed nicely and the plastic base strips have just been cut to fit and slid under the lower logs. Note the log which will eventually be fitted above the door, has been temporarily positioned to keep things square despite the gap in the front wall.

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How the joints between the front and rear wall and the middle wall were to be made was a mystery to us but the long logs with vertical holes near the joints gave us a clue and answered the question, ‘what were the square pegs for?’.

The square pegs or ‘wall dowels’ had their corners and ends rounded slightly which still resulted in a satisfying tight fit but with less chance of splitting the logs. The 3 on the left have been treated with a belt sander. About 1 minute per peg and about 60 pegs in total. A pencil mark at the halfway point was useful when banging in.

Wall Dowels

Don’t worry Mr F, these can confuse most people!

About 12 hours after we started and we realise that it’s quite a big Log Cabin!

Installed Walls

The Lauren Clockhouse Log Cabin is one of our longest products!

Day 2 and the roof is progressing well. For the first 2 days of construction there were 3 of us working with lots of carrying from storage area to site and quite a bit of head scratching as we searched for various specific logs. Three pairs of hands were useful as we positioned and fixed the heavy purling.

A start is made nailing the tongue & groove roof boards into position. Much later and all of the boards are fixed. Rain was expected so we protected the roof. Probably no need to but it made us feel better.

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Day 3 was mainly spent nailing floor boards. The nail gun chose a bad time to fail and resulted in much manual hammering. Day 4 was mainly spent fixing shingles to the rear. A slow job but looked good when done. Ladders R Us.

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Day 5, the small gable comes in 3 pieces which we screwed together at ground level then lifted into position. Inevitably, it complicated the fixing of shingles on the front and it was quite late on the Friday before we finished. On days 4 & 5, some time was spent hiding from the heavy showers which slowed us down a little.

We used some heavier timber to trim the base of the roof to provide a substantial mount for guttering. Note the notches required to fit it around the left, right and middle wall. With a bit more thought I could have cut the timber longitudinally to a better shape for the gutter brackets but now I’ll have to custom make a mounting for each bracket.

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End of day 5. It looks like the finished product but still needs a lot of detail work and much brushwork. The most important pieces of paper. A list of contents annotated by me with the log positions and the detailed diagrams showing each log position.

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Happiness is 3 empty pallets. Progress would have been quicker if I were able to unpack and lay out in piles all the various bits of timber. The sheer quantity of wood (and the animals in the field) precluded that, so quite some time was spent rummaging for specific pieces as required. The timber had been cut very accurately and we found that the lengths on the plan, accurate to the millimeter, were very useful in identifying the required log.

Empty Palettes

True happiness indeed!

As garden buildings go, this was a big project and I wasn’t too surprised that the main build took 5 days. Kharn, a professional builder, and I were very impressed with the quality of the material and the accuracy with which it had been prepared. The joints were well thought out and accurately milled although we were dealing with significant lumps of timber and found a club hammer, with protective wood, more useful than a mallet! Even a sledge hammer was found a use in squaring-up the part built walls. Apart from the nails in the floor and roof boards, and the wall dowels, virtually no other fixings were used. The wall logs and purlins stay in position because of the clever joints while the entire building sits steady on its base because of its weight. The packing had been very well done and, as far as I am aware, no parts were missing. Indeed, the supply of plain wood parts seemed generous. Although
there were 450kg of shingles we were a little concerned that we would run out. With 378 shingles we finished the roof with 2 remaining – very well judged by the manufactures.

Overall, I’m a very happy customer and, more importantly, so is my wife! An outstanding product at a bargain price. As the Americans would say, ‘A lot of bang for your buck’. Many thanks for the excellent service and the experience of the build has got my builder friend thinking of buying a smaller version for himself. I hope to have the staining and guttering done soon and will send you a picture of the finished item.


Thank you again Mr F for a detailed and informative overview of your installation process for the Lauren Clockhouse Log Cabin. It looks great and we can’t wait to see your pictures for when it’s completely finished! I hope you and your wife enjoy your log cabin!

Other customer experiences, build articles and tips can be found at: Pictorial Tuin Reviews.

Ulrik Twin Log Cabins

Our customer ordered two Ulrik Log Cabins to solve a storage, workshop and office problem he had and has been kind enough to share his story of the build with me. Mr J has some very good tips in terms of the base he used and construction and it’s well worth a read, especially if you are using a timber frame base.


These are the finished Ulrik Twin Log Cabins on a timber frame base with decking.

Ulrik 45mm log cabin, also available with double glazing

Ulrik 45mm log cabin, also available with double glazing

As well as a lot of other cracking ideas Mr J had an interesting use for our foundation beams, he wrote:

Firstly, I just wanted to say how delighted we are with our pair of Ulrik cabins. Your comprehensive website made the build process an absolute breeze, so I averaged 1.5 days for each including insulation – but not including treatment (almost at the end of 4 coats a piece using Sikkens).

Speaking of which, I thought I’d share a little ‘tip’ I discovered during the build.

I insulated both floor and roof (100mm and 50mm celotex respectively). I’d had a look at your website to see how you trimmed the eaves to cover the 50mm celotex, noting you said that additional wood may be required. Whilst I’d ordered the tantalised, profiled foundation beams with the cabin, as my build was already on a wooden frame they were effectively surplus to requirements. However, as luck would have it they are also very conveniently profiled so that mounting them to the eave edge with the lower ‘lip’ under the roof boards leaves almost exactly 50mm of upstand for the celotex! I just pilot drilled through to hit the roof board ends in the centres and fixed with 60mm screws.

Not only does the end result look perfectly neat, it resists the weather being tantalised! The fact that the lower lip acts as a drip edge is just a bonus. I just need to add the guttering.

Anyway, have attached a couple of pics of the trimming and the ‘twins’ now that they are complete. Who knows, it may result in some additional orders for the foundation profiles! Feel free to pass on with the website if you think it’s useful? I showed my neighbour (who also ordered a Tuin cabin on my recommendation) and he adopted the same approach – well, I helped him build his too after all.

Interesting use of our foundation beams when insulating the roof

Interesting use of our foundation beams when insulating the roof

Below is Mr J’s story, pictures, tips and advice which may also help you in your build, there are a lot of tips and very relevant if you are intending to use a timber frame base for your Log Cabin as well as some good hints on the actual install.

First job was to level the site. The garden has quite a fall on it, so the end was lowered and flattened to level. This also kept the ridge height below 2.5m

First job was to level the site. The garden has quite a fall on it, so the end was lowered and flattened to level. This also kept the ridge height below 2.5m

A 600mm-700mm trench was dug from the house to take 2 x 6mm SWA cables for electrical supply. The blue conduit contains 3 x CAT6 cables for internet etc.

A 600mm-700mm trench was dug from the house to take 2 x 6mm SWA cables for electrical supply. The blue conduit contains 3 x CAT6 cables for internet etc.

The blue conduit contains cat5 to the log cabins

The blue conduit contains cat5 to the log cabins

The trench was partially backfilled, then hazard tape laid to give warning for any future digging.

The trench was partially backfilled, then hazard tape laid to give warning for any future digging.

This was the supply to one of the old sheds. Plastic conduit just under the turf with twin and earth. Definitely NOT recommended!!!

This was the supply to one of the old sheds. Plastic conduit just under the turf with twin and earth. Definitely NOT recommended!!!

Site was marked out for the foundation frames and holes dug for the supporting posts.

Site was marked out for the foundation frames and holes dug for the supporting posts.

To support the wooden frame, holes were dug to take 4” tanalised posts set in postcrete. Whilst only 50mm-100mm is visible, each is about 600mm long

To support the wooden frame, holes were dug to take 4” tanalised posts set in postcrete. Whilst only 50mm-100mm is visible, each is about 600mm long

As a ‘belt-and-braces’ precaution, the posts were also coated in Creoseal. The bore holes in the top ensure that the Creoseal got to the heart of the post to stop rot. Whilst it’s the earth/moisture and organic matter that rots the posts, the holes were backfilled mostly with stones to deter this. A strong weed membrane was laid, large enough to create a French drain around the perimeter. Although, a soakway was also dug to take rainwater was the cabins will be guttered.

As a ‘belt-and-braces’ precaution, the posts were also coated in Creoseal. The bore holes in the top ensure that the Creoseal got to the heart of the post to stop rot. Whilst it’s the earth/moisture and organic matter that rots the posts, the holes were backfilled mostly with stones to deter this. A strong weed membrane was laid, large enough to create a French drain around the perimeter. Although, a soakway was also dug to take rainwater away and the log cabins will be guttered.

The frame extends also to create a front decking area. The cabin foundation ‘ring’ was doubled up with 150mm x 50mm timbers. This also means that the floor has something to sit on as the second timber sits inside the foundation perimeter.

The frame extends also to create a front decking area. The cabin foundation ‘ring’ was doubled up with 150mm x 50mm timbers. This also means that the floor has something to sit on as the second timber sits inside the foundation perimeter.

Care was taken at every stage to ensure the frame was absolutely level. Whilst a fall is required for the decking, this would be added later with spacers under the decking itself.

Care was taken at every stage to ensure the frame was absolutely level. Whilst a fall is required for the decking, this would be added later with spacers under the decking itself.

Perimeter beams all in. Now to fit the rest of the joists. Note soakaway to front. Rainwater will be collected via gutters to a water butt at the rear with overflow into the soakaway.

Perimeter beams all in. Now to fit the rest of the joists. Note soakaway to front. Rainwater will be collected via gutters to a water butt at the rear with overflow into the soakaway.

Joists installed with hangars. You could build a house on this frame, let alone a cabin!

Joists installed with hangars. You could build a house on this frame, let alone a Log Cabin!

Framework done, 100mm of Celotex was installed. As you can see from the middle ‘holes’, batten was used to the lower sides of the joists to support it. I have some concerns about rodents getting into it, so you could ply out the bottom first. But we have a cat ☺

Framework done, 100mm of Celotex was installed. As you can see from the middle ‘holes’, batten was used to the lower sides of the joists to support it. I have some concerns about rodents getting into it, so you could ply out the bottom first. But we have a cat ☺

Foundation framework all done – so just need some cabins to put on them.

Foundation framework all done – so just need some cabins to put on them.

Unfortunately for us, the site location is about 50m away from the drive where the cabin will be offloaded. Beams laid (level) to keep the cabin off the ground in case of rain.

Unfortunately for us, the site location is about 50m away from the drive where the cabin will be offloaded. Beams laid (level) to keep the cabin off the ground in case of rain.

Timely delivery of the cabin and the moffet lift.

Timely delivery of the cabin and the moffet fork lift.

Whilst we ordered two cabins, they came at staggered timings allowing us to erect each independently.

Whilst we ordered two log cabins, they came at staggered timings allowing us to erect each independently.

log-cabin-delivery-2

Easy does it!

Easy does it!

log-cabin-delivery-4

The shingles were removed and stored in case by some miracle we got some hot weather whilst the log cabin was built.

The shingles were removed and stored in case by some miracle we got some hot weather whilst the log cabin was built.

The packaging of the cabin is cleverly done, with very little wasted space. The plans are inside the package – but have a good pre-read of Tuin’s website to get a feel for the process

The packaging of the cabin is cleverly done, with very little wasted space. The plans are inside the package – but have a good pre-read of Tuin’s website to get a feel for the process

(For installation advice, videos and walkthroughs please see the Log Cabin Installation Advice page)

The packers at Tuin must love ‘Tetris’ ;)

The packers at Tuin must love ‘Tetris’ 😉

This was the second cabin I’d built (the other is exactly the same and sits to the right of this shot), so I knew the process. But to give you an idea of time – the foundation beams were laid at 18:05. I pre-treated the undersides of them with Sikkens Cetol and they also sit on a DPC. Checked for square, a screw was put in each corner to stop it moving about.

This was the second cabin I’d built (the other is exactly the same and sits to the right of this shot), so I knew the process. But to give you an idea of time – the foundation beams were laid at 18:05. I pre-treated the undersides of them with Sikkens Cetol and they also sit on a DPC. Checked for square, a screw was put in each corner to stop it moving about.

Now the walls start to be built.

Now the walls start to be built.

Refer to the plans to ensure you don’t build too high for the windows. It’s easily done as the walls go together so quickly! There’s quite a lean on the right side in this shot, but that will be corrected later when the gable goes on.

Refer to the plans to ensure you don’t build too high for the windows. It’s easily done as the walls go together so quickly! There’s quite a lean on the right side in this shot, but that will be corrected later when the gable goes on.

Door and window frames installed. Remember, do NOT fix these to the walls. They should float which allows the wood to move as it expands/contracts with varying moisture levels

Door and window frames installed. Remember, do NOT fix these to the walls. They should float which allows the wood to move as it expands/contracts with varying moisture levels

Now the gable and purlins are on, things are a bit more plumb – but not quite right yet.

Now the gable and purlins are on, things are a bit more plumb – but not quite right yet.

I didn’t have this issue with the first cabin, but that’s the nature of wood. The top wall planks on the right had a bit of twist in them which was pulling the wall out. A bit of ratchet strap engineering was employed and the cabin left overnight to settle. To get from foundation beam to this took just 2.5 hours – time stamp on pic shows 20:37

I didn’t have this issue with the first cabin, but that’s the nature of wood. The top wall planks on the right had a bit of twist in them which was pulling the wall out. A bit of ratchet strap engineering was employed and the cabin left overnight to settle. To get from foundation beam to this took just 2.5 hours – time stamp on pic shows 20:37

(Mr J gives a good solution here to a rare problem. If you come across this and the build time is critical you can also brace one side with a spare log or pallet parts to bring the structure square, when the roof boards are nailed on to the top logs and purlins the twist will always come out)

With the sun out on the following morning, it was time to roof the cabin.

With the sun out on the following morning, it was time to roof the cabin.

On a cabin of this size (3.8m x 3.8m) it takes about 90 minutes to board out the roof with two of you working on it.

On a cabin of this size (3.8m x 3.8m) it takes about 90 minutes to board out the roof with two of you working on it.

Lovely ☺

Lovely ☺

Top tip. Whilst I’d ordered tanalised, profiled foundation beams, I didn’t need them as I have a wood frame foundation. However, they are perfect to create an upstand on the roof edge for 50mm Celotex insulation! Being tanalised they’re perfect for the job ☺

Top tip. Whilst I’d ordered tanalised, profiled foundation beams, I didn’t need them as I have a wood frame foundation. However, they are perfect to create an upstand on the roof edge for 50mm Celotex insulation! Being tanalised they’re perfect for the job ☺

As you see, the profiled beams are perfect to trim the insulated roof boards. Note the double shingle layer on the right roof. The lower shingle is installed upside down (gravel side facing ground). I have over sailed to allow for guttering.

As you see, the profiled beams are perfect to trim the insulated roof boards. Note the double shingle layer on the right roof. The lower shingle is installed upside down (gravel side facing ground). I have over sailed to allow for guttering.

50mm Celotex fixed to roof with 60mm screws and washers (to stop screws from pulling through the Celotex). Boards foil taped together.

50mm Celotex fixed to roof with 60mm screws and washers (to stop screws from pulling through the Celotex). Boards foil taped together.

Before and after shingle-wise

Before and after shingle-wise

Shingles take time to do, but are very simple. Good instructions on the Tuin website. Note neighbours foundation frame – they have a Tuin Log Cabin arriving shortly too!

Shingles take time to do, but are very simple. Good instructions on the Tuin website. Note neighbours foundation frame – they have a Tuin Log Cabin arriving shortly too!

(For installation advice and videos showing the shingles please see: IKO Shingles. Please note when using roof insulation you will need to use longer clout nails sourced locally, for more advice on insulating your log cabin please see: Insulating a log cabin roof and floor)

Ridge done accounting for the usual wind direction.

Ridge done accounting for the usual wind direction.

The Ulrik ‘twins’ log cabins. The wood is protected with 2 undercoats of Sikkens Cetol HLS plus and finished with a further 2 of Sikkens Filter 7 Plus in light oak.

The Ulrik ‘twins’ log cabins. The wood is protected with 2 undercoats of Sikkens Cetol HLS plus and finished with a further 2 of Sikkens Filter 7 Plus in light oak.

Flooring installed using 22mm P5 T&G floor boards. Edges glued and screwed.

Flooring installed using 22mm P5 T&G floor boards. Edges glued and screwed.

Whilst one of the cabins is purely a workshop, the other is a day/play room. As such, it gets an oak engineered wood floor. The base membrane is breathable to prevent warping due to different moisture levels between the P5 and the flooring.

Whilst one of the log cabins is purely a workshop, the other is a day/play room. As such, it gets an oak engineered wood floor. The base membrane is breathable to prevent warping due to different moisture levels between the P5 and the flooring.

log-cabin-floor-2

log-cabin-floor-3

Cabins finished, time to deck the front. 144mm x 32mm Redwood planks in this case.

Cabins finished, time to deck the front. 144mm x 32mm Redwood planks in this case.

Decking finished, the only jobs remaining are to fill the French drains with slate, guttering and install the electrics.

Decking finished, the only jobs remaining are to fill the French drains with slate, guttering and install the electrics.

I would like to thank Mr J for sending me this post and pictures, there is some great information here and I know it will help other customers with their project.

If anyone would like to send in pictures and a story we always offer further discounts on products, presents and in some cases a cheque.

For all Customer pictorial reviews please see this page: Tuin Customer Blog Reviews

UPDATE: Mr J sent in further pictures of his building and an ingenious use of left over parts: Ulrik log cabin pt 2.

Tuin Installation – Philip

We do offer an installation service for our products but with VAT and all the expenses a company faces we can be rather expensive.

I personally don’t like things costing more than they should which is why a couple of years ago I asked for a new way of doing things to give you an alternative and cheaper option.

Yes we can install for you as a company but we will also give you details of recommended installers. We take nothing from them and ask nothing from you. This way you get the benefit of a very experienced fitter at a reasonable price who is self employed and without VAT.

Philip – Independent Garden Building Fitter:

We maintain a list of top fitters, Philip is one of them and these are examples of his work and services. Other fitters also offer additional services that we cannot.

A very impressive fit in a difficult location using a timber frame base of brick piers.

A very impressive fit in a difficult location using a timber frame base of brick piers.

Please see this page for advice on bases: https://www.tuin.co.uk/blog/base-requirements-for-log-cabins/

Philip has modified the veranda from the standard positioning.

Philip has modified the veranda from the standard positioning.

The Gunnar normally has a side porch but Philip was asked to adjust it and cut it down.

The Gunnar normally has a side porch but Philip was asked to adjust it and cut it down.

It's not just log cabins and Philip is very experienced in installing our gazebos. This is the Grande Gazebo.

It’s not just log cabins and Philip is very experienced in installing our gazebos. This is the Grande Gazebo.

One of my favourite log cabins - The 58mm Henning with the added annexe. Please notice the timber framed base and jack pads.

One of my favourite log cabins – The 58mm Henning with the added annexe. Please notice the timber framed base and jack pads. Philip also offers treatment service depending on your location.

Perfect roof coverage with normal felt on the Maja Log Cabin

Perfect roof coverage with normal felt on the Maja Log Cabin

A really nice floor laid by Philip is one of our Nora hexagonal log cabins.

A really nice floor laid by Philip is one of our Nora hexagonal log cabins.

Philip also offers a base laying service, this Paiva gazebo log cabin in perfect!

Philip also offers a base laying service, this Paiva gazebo log cabin in perfect!

An alternative to our T&G timber floor, Philip is using OSB as a prelude to laminate flooring in our Wigan 58mm log cabin.

An alternative to our T&G timber floor, Philip is using OSB as a prelude to laminate flooring in our Wigan 58mm log cabin.

Completed laminate flooring in the Wigan log cabin, perfect for a garden office!

Completed laminate flooring in the Wigan log cabin, perfect for a garden office!

Philip uses thicker insulation and then sandwiches it using OSB sheets on the 58mm Wigan log cabin.

Philip uses thicker insulation and then sandwiches it using OSB sheets on the 58mm Wigan log cabin.

Philip installing one of our Yorick garden office log cabins.

Philip installing one of our Yorick garden office log cabins.

A more simpler install, the Summertime 34mm log cabin.

A more simpler install, the Summertime 34mm log cabin.

Philip travels all over the UK, he’s extremely reasonable and works in a two man team. He can also, depending on location, offer the full service including bases and treatment options.

Look out for Philip in our fitter recommendations lists.

Log Cabin Fitting Tips

I’ve written this to give as many tips as I can to help YOU install. This will be added to over time and it will take a while and is still not complete but hopefully what I have done so far will help you and give you some confidence.

This post is aimed at customers who would like to install a Log cabins on their own but are a little worried or inexperienced. Before we start – Remember: fitting a log cabin  is EASY and very rewarding.

It is also for customers who have an installer lined up but want to know that it is going to be done properly. There’s a few hints at the beginning to make sure they are!

Introduction

I really do encourage the fitting yourself, when I was a fitter and sub-contracted to lots of companies I would spend all day maybe two days fitting and at the end, after the customer had watched me do it all, they would then tell me he had paid a ton of cash for the fit (some upwards of £1200) and tell me “I could have done that”

Customers will often tell me the instructions with the cabins are not enough – See some of our reviews, you will often see them say the instructions were terrible but the service was great, product great etc. This is after they have installed the cabin though  – They must have been OK to actually install it and then say how terrible they were.

OK, maybe they are not great as some things are missed out but with this post and videos most questions should be answered.

Fitting a log cabin is straightforward – mostly, you need to be able to follow a plan and have some general DIY skills. You or your fitter need to understand what you are dealing with. My golden rules are

  • Don’t think about it too much or panic over all the bits and you will! When you unpack it – Don’t panic!
  • Don’t think it will ‘just slot together’ other cabins might, ours have tight joints for very good reasons. They also have wind and water-tight connections you may not find elsewhere. These are there to make sure your cabin does not leak in years to come when it is out of any warranty.
  • Don’t worry about anything you weren’t expecting.
  • Every Time a 100% flat and level base in all planes – this is the start of the build, get the base wrong and there’s a ton of problems. Check your installer has correctly chocked any discrepancies in the base with treated wood and the logs are fully supported. Tips on Bases for Log Cabins
  • IMPORTANT – The GOLDEN rule is that a log cabin moves! Understand this. Tell your fitter DO NOT fix anything to the wall logs without allowing for movement. Ensure a fitter is aware of this: do not fix door or window frames to the logs in ANYWAY except the bottom of the frame.
  • Understand there are expansion gaps to the top and sides of the windows and doors which are hidden by fascias. These have to be there.

If you are after a quote from an installer no log cabin under 4m x 3m should take more than a day. Over this size is two days.

Our biggest – The Edelweiss log cabin is three – four days. Longer than this and the quote is wrong!

If you are installing yourself please read on and allow an extra day to the times quoted above.

I’ll try to give some hints and tips that will help you. I prefer all our customers to install themselves, it saves the comment at the end of the install and a ton of cash spent of ‘I could have done that’

PART ONE – Easy

We used to offer a fitting service but with VAT and company profits it was getting a bit expensive at £950 a day. Instead we now recommend independent installers who can fit for you and are far cheaper without VAT and company profits on top of wages. Some customers such as the government, councils, military and those customers who like to keep a everything in one place will still use us in some circumstances. We can pass the details of these fitters to you.

OR

Fit yourself and avoid the disappointing comment of ‘I could have done that’ after you have watched them install it.

The average cost of a fit with a self employed team is about £350 – £450 a day. A fit can add substantially to what was an economical purchase.  A great number of people when considering purchasing a cabin are often phased by what they presume is a complicated fit and are often put off the idea.  So with that said, my first tip:

FITTING A LOG CABIN IS EASY

Yup, I’ve said it again, fitting a log cabin is definitely easy, even I can do it.  Of course you will have asked for the fitting instructions and maybe you’ll have been furnished with the plans (follow the ones WITH the cabin though).  You’ll have looked at both of them.  Most of the time one of the first thoughts that goes through your mind is ‘oh hell’, perhaps not that but usually it’s an expletive.  Keep in mind though my first tip:  ‘It’s Easy’.

So lets look at the instructions, all of them are pretty much the same.  All log cabins follow the same design process ignoring the doors and windows for a moment though (each supplier has a slightly different take on these).

We produce a generic instruction booklet and this is sent with each log cabin: Generic Log Cabin Fitting Instructions to compliment these I have written a very large online guide this includes lots of information and in depth videos which is being constantly added to.

Have a quick read through them, it’s fairly straight forward but is it still a little daunting?

The instructions generally mean nothing though without the plans.  The plans will show you and tell you everything and are the most important document used during the fit. The plans will be INSIDE your log cabin package when delivered.

The ones we shall look at during this series of posts will be the Wolfgang Log Cabin.

This is one of our best sellers and could be construed as complicated, it really isn’t, remember;  ‘It’s Easy!”.  So lets have a look at the plans, use this link:  Wolfgang Log Cabin Plans. and have a look at what you can expect.

Fitting a wolfgang log cabin is Easy!

Fitting a wolfgang log cabin is Easy!

If you are inexperienced or not used to building projects these plans may also appear to be a little daunting.  Keep in mind that it is easy and work slowly through them.  The first page shows a ‘consist’  These are all the parts that will be found in the pack(s).  All log cabins supplied by us or other manufacturers will always have a consist list and this will be referred to often.

Page two and three shows the elevations of the building, Holland call them ‘wands’.

These are scale drawings and show the exact components used.   The final page shows the floor plan and clearly shows the elevations (wands).

These plans are hugely important and construction cannot be successful without carefully following them.  I usually put them in a plastic folder to keep them clean and pin them close to where I am fitting, I refer to them constantly and so will you during the installation. I ‘count logs’ constantly during a fit. It’s a bugger to put too many in and then have to take logs out so always count constantly and refer to the plans as you count.

In summary for this section:

  • Fitting a log cabin is EASY!
  • Where possible, pin up a copy of the plans close to where you will be installing the cabin.  Refer to the plans constantly.
  • Carefully look at the plans and identify half starter logs and other featured logs.
  • COUNT – Count always against the plans, be careful not to put extra logs in. On site I will do this a lot to make sure I am not going to high before a window or a feature.

PART TWO – Delivery and the Weather

So a quick recap, we spoke about the fact that it’s a simple process and that the plans are massively important.  Look at them constantly and count logs as you fit them

We’re still going to continue looking at the plans for the Wolfgang but the pictures I’ll be showing are for an entirely different building.  It’s a bespoke building which I built at a nudist camp …. another story completely!

So lets look at the packages and how they will arrive.  The picture below shows how most log cabin packages will look, remember though this project was quite sizeable so we had several packages.

A log cabin generally arrives in packages such as these and are protected from the elements

A log cabin generally arrives in packages such as these and are protected from the elements with plastic coverings.

All our cabins are transported via an articulated lorry with a demountable ‘moffit’ forklift similar to this.

All good suppliers of log cabins will use one of these to delivery your building

All good suppliers of log cabins will use one of these to delivery your building

These are brilliant things, it means we can deliver a large number of cabins (usually 10 – 15) in one ’round robin’ on a huge lorry making delivery very economical for the customer and us.  It also means we can be very manoeuvrable with large packages, some times which can be up to 6.0m in length. (your package will be the longest wall log)  From a fitting point of view make sure your delivery is being made with a demountable forklift otherwise you could find that the delivery man cannot get your packages where you need them, which then means unpacking and moving prior to a fit when you are not necessarily ready to install. It’s always a good idea to check the delivery method with you supplier. We ONLY use moffets but others may ask you to off load yourself which can be a bit of a pain

Back to talking about the packages your log cabin will come in.  Depending on the size of the building will depend on the number of packages and the size of them.

Wolfgang log cabin comes in two packages and one measures 4.80m in length by approximately 1m x 1m.  Normally the package is going to be the length of the longest single log. Refer to the plans before hand or ask us so you know what you can expect.

The packages serve the following purposes:

  • To protect the cabin from the weather be it sun or rain, they should be sealed in plastic and securely banded to a pallet.
  • To protect the cabin during transportation. Packing a log cabin is a recognised art and many packers are head hunted from factory to factory and can command very good wages.   To cram that much into a package is a skilled process.  Each component is tightly packed to form an extremely robust and rigid block of timber and the packers are often head hunted across the factories.
  • The tighter the package the less likely damage will occur  during storage and transportation.

So, my tips for part two of series, remembering the above:

1.  Don’t assume parts are in order!  Many people expect the cabin to be packed in order, in fact some slightly dodgy companies will tell you they are: They never are as they are packed for economy of transportation and not installation. So with that in mind, be aware that you will more than likely have to unpack all the components prior to installation.  When unpacking, depending on the size of the finished building a lot of room can be needed. If you can, try to stack the logs in the various sizes and on top of each other not side by side.

2.  Warping!  One of the reasons cabins are packed the way they are is to prevent warping of the logs.  As soon as you start unpacking you need to be very aware of this and as the components are removed you must make sure they are kept straight and level.

I always make sure I have spare timber, or often use the ‘packing’ pieces to lay them on and that the surface they are on is as flat as possible.  This is very important especially if the fit is going to take a few days as with the strong sun the logs can warp which makes it a little harder when installing.

However, don’t let the rain, snow or sun or even a huge storm put you off installing, I’ve unpacked and done an install in all weathers and even the most warped log is not a problem and can alway be moved into position, such is the beauty of wood.

The joy of a log cabin install in the wet. I remember this morning, we had to remove a layer of snow off the roof and then it rained all day while trying to install the insulation and roof shingles.

The joy of a log cabin install in the wet. I remember this morning well, we had to remove a layer of snow off the roof and then it rained all day while installing the insulation and roof shingles. Don’t let the weather stop you from installing, I’ve done them in storms, hail, snow …. it’s all fun! Just look at the joy on my colleagues face …. you too could have this much fun!

So, in summary for today’s tips:

Don’t assume the parts will be in order, be aware that a lot of room maybe needed.

Be careful and aware of how you store your wall logs – keep them straight and don’t worry about the weather conditions except the very hot sun and then try to cover the logs to protect them from the direct heat.

You can install in any weather. You do not need to wait for a ‘Window’ no amount of rain or wet will affect the build, all it affects is you!

A better way to store your logs with one on top of each other to avoid warps, bows or twists.

A good way to store and sort your logs with one on top of each other to avoid warps, bows or twists and laid out nicely so you can see all the sizes necessary for the build.

For the famous Nudist camp log cabin we were very tight for storage and we had to position them on the base roughly where they were going to go.

Storing the logs as best we could but alway flat on top of each other.

Storing the logs as best we could but always flat on top of each other.

Here’s another one, logs on TOP of each other to help stop warps, bows and twists.

Log stored flat and on top of each other to help stop the formation of bows, warps and twists.

Log stored flat and on top of each other to help stop the formation of bows, warps and twists.

PART THREE – How Long does it take to fit

This is an extract from another blog post but extremely relevant at this point and is still focused on the Wolfgang install:

I was sent some interesting pictures from a kind customer and it reminded me of all the times I’m asked:  ‘how long does it take to fit a log cabin?’

This is a bit of a tough question really and I think it all comes down to trust, whether you trust Yourself, the Plans, the Product or the Company you are buying from and the advice and help you receive from them.

No trust at all

  • Yourself – If you are worried about yourself, your ability to read the plans and the confidence you can identify a log it will take longer.
  • If you second guess the plans or question what they are showing you too much it will take longer
  • If you don’t entirely trust the company or you are looking for faults in the product it is going to take longer as you will be worrying, you’ll be going over every small detail, counting every possible part over and over again, worrying you have one roof board too few or wondering what this piece of wood is, or where is that piece and where it’s going to go. This is going to take you a lot longer to build your cabin.
  • If you don’t trust the advice you’ve been given it’s going to take longer, you wouldn’t believe how many times I’ve had to argue with a customer (normally a builder or a carpenter) that there are expansion gaps for a reason and that you don’t fix the doors or window frames to the logs.

Without trust in all of the above or at least a few of them your build will take longer.

Trust

If you are going to buy from us or others I’d like you to have some trust at least in some of the above.

  • Yourself – Identify the parts as you unpack and make a mental note of them. Trust that you can read the plans. I’ll had some advice at the bottom of this post with some quick identification hints.
  • Plans – Follow the plans that came WITH the building, try not to second guess them or disbelieve them, follow them exactly.
  • Trust the advice you are given. I don’t know much about other companies support these days but we try to give you as much information as possible. Personally I spend a lot of time writing and updating these blogs with help and advice. This advice is also transferable to any ‘Good Make’ of log cabin. Some of it won’t work with rubbish – watch out for cabins when you have to screw the logs together or a roof you can’t actually work on as the purlins are so small. Worse still if you don’t have wind and watertight connections then ignore all of my advice as you have bought rubbish and I can’t help you.

How long Does it Take to Fit a Log Cabin?

The pictures Mr C sent to me are further down the page, what I loved is that they are date and time stamped which shows quite clearly how long the build took.

The building is a Wolfgang Log Cabin, we’ve been talking about a pretty daunting structure for most customers with two rooms and an odd shape. Before you look at the pictures from Mr C, honestly ask yourself how long you think this build would take you.

The Wolfgang log cabin which is 5.3 x 4.5 with an attached shed and porch. How long do you think this takes to install?

The Wolfgang log cabin which is 5.3 x 4.5 with an attached shed and porch. How long do you think this takes to install?

How long did you think? I bet some of you will be thinking four or five days, maybe more? Here’s Mr C’s pictures and notice the time stamps on them.

The build started from scratch at about 0800. The cabin was then unpacked, stacked in components sizes. Critical parts identified and put to one side. This picture is time stamped 0944 so we're about an hour and three quarters into the fit. Unpacking and moving takes a good hour.

The build started from scratch at about 08:00. The cabin was then unpacked, stacked in components sizes. Critical parts identified and put to one side. This picture is time stamped 0944 so we’re about an hour and three quarters into the fit. Unpacking and moving takes a good hour.

Now at 1025 and the doors and windows are in and they are almost at the eaves height.

Now at 10:25 and the doors and windows are in and they are almost at the eaves height.

1347 which is about six hours into the fit and the roof shingles are almost done.

13:47 which is about six hours into the fit and the roof shingles are almost done.

1907 and the fitters have left site, tidied up and even had time to fit the guttering during the install.

19:07 and the fitters have left site, tidied up and even had time to fit the guttering during the install.

So there you have it, fitted in a day, and this building is probably one of our most complicated ones. These are the plans they will have been following: Log Cabin Plans and are the same as the ones referenced at the beginning of the post.

But of course, these guys you will say ‘know what they are doing’, there are no real tricks honest.

It’s not a matter of ‘they know all the parts’ All they are doing is trusting themselves, the plans and the product. The only edge they will have on someone doing it for the first time is they can identify parts in the plans and sort them as they are unpacking, i’ll come on to that a bit later.

Of course I’ll give a little leeway for inexperience and I would say this cabin should take you, being inexperienced, two – two and a half days. My rule of thumb is a 4 x 3m and less is generally one day, bigger is one and a half to two and a monster like the Edelweiss is three to four.

This though is only if you have trust and the package is within 100m of the base.

It’s taken forever – Richard you’re WRONG!

If you are considering one of our log cabins no doubt you will have a scan through some of our reviews. Have a look at the reviews for Asmund Corner Log Cabin, this is one of our best sellers.

You’ll see lots of varying time scales in the various reviews from 1 day all the way to 5 days

  • My wife & I constructed the cabin with virtually no assistance in 5 days which went well
  • The cabin itself took my brother and myself only a few days to completely assemble and finish
  • All in all 11 hours and the cabin was fully erected and roof tiles in place
  • It’s taken me about 5 working days to construct, single-handed
  • Quick construction – 3 days in total, four once I have finished the shingling.
  • It has taken three adults two days to complete the build.
  • I paid a local landscaping contractor to build mine, and it took 2 men with carpentry skills 2.5 days to assemble it
  • very easy to assemble
  • instructions for assembly are easy to follow to construct.
  • As occasional DIY’rs I couldn’t believe how quickly we built it
  • The cabin was quite straightforward to put together, taking about 4 days to build in total (Two people)
  • My husband and Son, put it up in no time at all, with no problems
  • It took 1.5 days to erect with 2 men.

So yes, you could well shout at me after you have found it’s taken longer but I still stand by my assessment is that it’s all down to Trust in yourself, the Product, Plans, Company and Advice.

It’s interesting that some customers get it banged up really quickly, yet the review left by a poor lady who hired a ‘landscaper with carpentry skills’ to build hers took 2.5 days and had a lot of problems, I remember well talking those ‘Fitters’ through it.

If you are employing fitters such as carpenters, joiners or builders gently point them to all our advice. A log cabin could be totally new to them even if they don’t admit it to you. Don’t rely on their trade giving them the information on the correct way to install a cabin.

As a quick example this was an installation by ‘Professional Carpenter and joiner of 20 years experience’

Very large gaps in the wall logs were appearing and the customer assured me it was installed by a carpenter of 20 years experience and she had used him for loads of work and his work was of an excellent standard so therefore it was our fault.

Very large gaps in the wall logs were appearing and the customer was in discussion with me after this happened six months later. She assured me it was installed by a carpenter of 20 years experience (I shudder when I hear this statement) and she had used him for loads of work and that his work was of an excellent standard so therefore the building was defective.

Gaps were showing in her building

Gaps were showing in her building

I explained to the customer exactly what was wrong with this log cabin several times but she would not take my advice and kept referring to how experienced the carpenter was that had installed it.

See there’s the Trust issue again!

The customer was very uncooperative and after discussions I agreed to visit her. If it was our fault I had agreed we would supply a complete new building and also cover all the costs for installation and painting. But, if it was not our fault she would pay for the inspection and rectification.

Our customer trusted her experienced carpenter and refused to trust me. I found this nail, one of many through the window and door frames into the logs. This will stop your building from moving and you will either have gaps or splits caused by this.

Our customer trusted her experienced carpenter and refused to trust me.

Nails in the fascia going through to the logs.

Nails in the fascia going through to the logs.

I found several nails going through the window and door fascias which went into the logs. Doing this will stop your building from moving and you will either have gaps or splits.

After I removed all of these the whole thing settled back down again to where it should be and all gaps closed straightaway. Remind any fitter, no matter what trade – WOOD MOVES and doors and windows have to be independent to the wall logs, I guarantee you a tradesperson will always overlook this if they have not installed a cabin before.

The lady was a bit miffed having to pay me for the visit and the ‘Experience Carpenter’ who met me on site with her was incredibly embarrassed.

If you’re employing a trade, gently remind them to have a look at the various pieces of advice there is and they will fit quicker, be cheaper and you and I won’t be having a discussion in a few months time.

So what’s the secret?

The secret to a quick install is all in the identification of parts in the plans and not worrying about what you do not understand. I always tell people I talk to: ‘Take it one stage at a time’.

All will become clear as it goes up and do not focus on bits you do not understand until you reach that point. The biggest mistake with an installation is over thinking it. Fitting a log cabin is Easy!

We start our day fitting and note the package number we find on the packaging, just in case we have problems later and need to ask for parts, claims etc, if you buy from us we will always ask for this number so you may as well note it down just in case.

  • Take the tanalised lengths of timber off the package or the profiled foundation beams, put them straight onto your base and do not worry about them.
  • You will find a big bag of nails and roofing tacks, put these to one side. Yes we send lots, don’t worry about them.
  • Do not open the floor packs if you have these. These will be on top of the main package.  Put them away somewhere, you don’t need these until the cabin has been built.
  • Take the plastic off carefully and try to keep it in one piece, it might be handy to use this if it chucks down later or to cover the purlins / rafters / apexes to protect them from the sun.
  • The pack is not going to be in fitting order so don’t expect it to be.
  • Start unpacking and look at the various log sizes as you go, put each log size in it’s own area. Do not think about anything at this point, just unpack it and lay out the logs of the same size on top of each other. Make extra stacks next to them if needed you can go about ten logs high before the stack gets a bit unstable. Try to keep them supported, it helps if you have some timber to lay and support them on.
  • Anything you can’t identify – Don’t start looking at the plans for it and don’t worry about it, put it to one side and remember where you put it and roughly what it looked like.
  • Rafter and purlins are easy to spot. Put them to one side and away from the build, keep them straight, supported and covered from a hot sun to stop any warps.
  • When you come across a log that has been cut horizontally in half put it straight onto the base, this is a starter log and the beginning of the build. It may also be a top log but worry about it later.
  • Roof boards will all be together, put these to one side and do not worry about them.
  • As you unpack you will come to the plans and generic instructions. Put these to one side, don’t even look at them. You can also see far more detailed generic instructions and videos online that I have written to compliment those received with the log cabin if you fancy reading them: Installation Manual
  • Keep unpacking and for most buildings you will come to doors and windows, put these somewhere safe.

You should now have an area full of logs, bits and bobs. Don’t worry about any of it, and don’t panic at the site of it – ‘one section at a time’ and this is what all professional fitters will do.

Quick Identification of parts

So here’s a few heads up, look for these as you unpack the cabin and Do NOT worry about any of them, recognise them and put them to one side depending on your cabin.

Starter logs, these are logs cut horizontally in half

Starter logs, these are logs cut horizontally in half

Normal logs, nothing is different with these, they are all the same even when attached to a half starter log

Normal logs, nothing is different with these, they are all the same even when attached to a half starter log. If you have posts for canopies these may be longer than required. You can cut these down to fit as required.

You may find odd cut logs, put these to one side until you need then and do not worry about them

You may find odd cut logs, put these to one side until you need then and do not worry about them. When you come to that section in the plans then look at them. Do not over think a build – it’s Easy!

Some times with the corner log cabin look for a log with the tongues cut off. Put it to one side and worry about it when you need it.

Some times with the corner log cabin look for a log with the tongues cut off. Put it to one side and worry about it when you need it.

Summary of Part Three

  • Do not panic at all the bits
  • Try to identify the parts as you are unpacking them and don’t worry about anything you cannot immediately identify.
  • Place the most common parts together and don’t worry about the odd things you do not understand until you are at that point.
  • As you are installing only worry about the section you are at. As you build you will understand other parts that come into it as you reach that level.
  • As you build more and more wood is used and as the piles become less other odd parts will become clear.

More tips coming soon.

This post is a work in progress and will be added to over time until complete. Please see the videos at the bottom of the page which will give you lots of hints and tips.

If you have any questions at all regarding installation please always ask us, even out of hours as several of us often check emails for helps requests on our days / time off.

If you need help out of hours send an email to info@tuin.co.uk and entitle it Fitting Help and myself or other experienced fitters will get back to you. It helps if you send us a picture(s) of what you are seeing and a brief description of the problem.

Please make sure you also read the very detailed instruction manual that compliments, replaces and enhances the manual that comes with the cabin:

Detailed Log Cabin Fitting Video

This video has been added and will help greatly with your fit. I have heavily annotated this with lots of advice but you will need a PC to see them as with Ipad / mobile devices for some reason YouTube annotations don’t work.

This is an apex cabin and yes I know it’s quite long but I wanted to make every step clear. Most of this will also apply with pyramid log cabins.

It’s interesting when I look at the stats people view up to 9.46 minutes, I know it’s boring but try to watch a little longer to see how we support the purlins so they are straight and the fitting of the final parts including the roof trims that are always questioned,

Sorry it’s so long but it had to be to get everything in!

Corner Log Cabin install – Quick Overview.

This is just a quick overview of a corner cabin install. A more detailed one will follow as we make them but this gives you a good idea that it isn’t too hard. The roof can be a little tricky to get perfectly lined up but with patience it is not hard at all.