Preparing Your Log Cabin For The Winter

Hello everyone!

I’m sure you’ve noticed right now, but winter is coming, which for the UK means plenty of cold mornings, rain and, if we’re lucky, some snow. I feel like most people would love to just stay at home in a cosy room all day when it comes to winter, almost like hibernation, and one way you can find your area of peace and warmth is within your Log Cabin.

But before we continue, this post will be about the interior decor of a Log Cabin- If you want a building that will suffice through the groggy weather than you will need to be prepared. We recommend for all year around use at least a 40mm Log Cabin should be considered, although when thinking of logs it’s all about the heat capacity. So for a slightly more expensive cabin, such as our 58mm Log Cabins or 70mm Log Cabins, you would save money in the long run when it comes to heating and keeping the heat in the building. Insulating your Log Cabin will also aid greatly when it comes to keeping warm in the colder months.

We also highly recommend that you learn about expansion in Log Cabins and how timber naturally acts within the damper months. Although the process of expansion is normal for timber, there are a few ways that you can help prevent this, this especially includes treating your Log Cabin correctly, with the most suitable products for timber buildings.

Now, let’s say that you have/are getting a Log Cabin, and are all ready for the winter months. What else could you do to build that warm and cosy sanctuary you envisioned? The rest of this blog should help inspire you on how to complete the interior of your Log Cabin.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Many of our customers use a woodburner to provide heat into their Log Cabins, and it’s a great idea! So long as it’s installed correctly, so if you are thinking of installing one please use a qualified installer in the process. The important things to consider is the natural expansion and contraction of the log cabin and that the flue needs to accommodate this without restrictions.

If the idea of wood burners within a wooden building concerns you – Why not try out an electric heater? A electrical convection heater is known to be enough to heat a Log Cabin, a great example is shown within our Emma Log Cabin.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Another example is this Piet Log Cabin that has been turned into extra accomodation, it just oozes with comfort- Complete with a bathroom, small kitchen area and a double bed, all of which are kept warm with the use of an electrical convection heater. These two cabins also have another common feature – Fluffy blankets, they are truly a winter necessity.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

There is a large selection of cabins that have plenty of room for a double bed, maybe even a queen sized? One of them being the Henning Log Cabin, this example also features windowsill plants – A nice but subtle way to become more in touch with nature.

The Henning Log Cabin

The windows across the front and side of the cabin allows plenty of natural light to be let in, further building the homely atmosphere this cabin provides.

With the use of additional logs that match your Log Cabin, or the use of cladded panels, there’s not much to stop you taking our standard kits and customising them to your preference. As shown with the Piet above and also with this 45mm Hendrick Log Cabin.

Measuring at 5m x 5m, there’s plenty of ‘play room’ for you to add internal walls giving users of the cabin their own privacy when it’s needed, especially when it comes to the bathroom. You may not think that 5m x 5m is that big, but you will be surprised at this example of the Hendrick- Featuring a bedroom, bathroom and kitchen.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Prefer sleeping higher than the usual bed? The Berlin Log Cabin features an upper level that’s just right to put a bed in and the bare necessities- I love the little window on this upper level, could you imagine being able to look at the sky so easily while you’re in bed?

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Did you know that we have a few buildings for these moments in mind? For example the Camping Barrel, to help you sleep in style or work in comfort. Featuring two separate rooms to help you keep what you need, in the area you need it in.

Log Cabin Camping Barrel

It also seems that this owner put the bed in a higher position in order to gain some extra storage space. A brilliant idea

I realise as I’m typing this, not everyone likes to spend all of their days in bed, but a seating area can still be inviting and cosy. For example, this colourful Blackpool Log Cabin:

Blackpool Log Cabin Office

Used as an office/study, these customers used contrasting colours to help brighten up the inside of their Blackpool cabin- With the blankets, cushions ready to be used for the winter.

Another colourful example is this Yorick Log Cabin, with the feature length windows giving in plenty of natural light, the light is also used to make the cushions on this corner sofa stand out! Not to mention that the sofa does look perfect for a social evening. Monopoly with a cuppa, anyone?

Yorick Garden Office Log Cabin

Corner sofas really are a great way to utilise space in your cabin, and sometimes (especially for smaller cabins) less is more. For example this Daisy Log Cabin, featuring just the necessities for a lovely evening.

Daisy Log Cabin

The colour scheme for this cabin is also a wise choice, the wider wall colour will help add more visual space.

… Is it too early to mention Christmas?

Yorick Garden Office Log Cabin

Hear me out though, a sofa, table and a bar?! That is some impressive space utilisation.

Another beautifully made seating/study area is this Ukrik Log Cabin, that contradicts the earlier posts – Soft interior works too! It’s all about finding a colour scheme that suits your tastes, as well as finding enough chairs to get everyone in, since we’ve proven that space won’t be a problem for some of these cabins.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

And of course, what would be a post by myself if it didn’t include a Shepherds Hut or two? It’s one of the main reasons why I love these so much, even though they look plain and simple on the outside, there are so many ways in which you can transform a Shepherds Hut! The majority of these examples are from our Gypsy Caravan model.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

A Log Cabin can easily be turned into a cosy area with a few things. Of course, there is making sure you are prepared for when log cabin expansion naturally occurs, along with having the most suitable log thickness and insulation for the job. Once the fundamentals are down, then you can start playing with a colour scheme that reflects you and your personality, picking the heating source you’d prefer and of course, finding all of the fluffy blankets and cushions that you can.

How are you preparing for the winter? We’d love to learn how in the comments below!

Newcastle Log Cabin Customer Build

Hello everyone,

It’s been a little time since we’ve had an in depth customer review – Understandable with this heat, not many people would want to install their log cabins in the recent months. But we do have a fair few customers who like to challenge the heat! For example, Mr & Mrs C, who have kindly summed up their journey of their Newcastle Log Cabin installation within this article.


Mr C writes as follows:

After weeks of research it looked by all accounts that Tuin were the people to buy from! And after several hours reading the wealth of information on their site I was not only convinced these guys knew what they were talking about, but also had a real passion for the product. Si, I hit the button and bought a Tuin 58mm Newcastle cabin, to become my new office/workshop.

The cabin arrived bang on time and unloading was a doddle with their side loading forklift. I was relieved to find the whole package was very securely wrapped and un-damaged. The cabin had to sit on the drive for a week as I finished off the groundworks, but the packing kept everything dry and clean.

The Unloaded Newcastle Log Cabin Package

First job was to clear the site. A step ladder, a beer and a chainsaw! What’s the worst that could happen right? (Not recommended! – Meg)

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Next was a quick beer while the wife unloaded the hardcore – Then while we waited for her to break the larger lumps up! (I hope you realise that I’m making this bit up right?)

Access was tricky, but a concrete pump soon got the job done!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Base finished! Ready for the retailing wall. 28° heat, what could be better than digging sleepers into the ground 🙁

Newcastle Base Prep

Next, the build begins. (Seemed a shame to hide my nice retaining wall) Unfortunately, the cabin wall bearers had twisted badly in the searing heat. This made the first logs down a little tricky, but as the walls started to go up the bearers had little choice but to flatten out.

Newcastle Log Cabin Wall Installation

Every log slotted into the next like they were machined out of metal, I was amazed at the accuracy of each cut. The logs were straight and clean – I was starting to feel quite happy!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

End of day one! Apart from being sick of hammering nails into roof boards, everything else had gone like clockwork.

Newcastle Log Cabin Roofboard Installation

Next day came the doors and roof. (Oh, goody, more nails!) The shingles were of excellent quality and easy to lay. I had opted to insulate from within the cabin, so we just laid them out on to the roof boards.

Newcastle Log Cabin Roof Shingles

I think the floor was my biggest disappointment – after the way the rest of the cabin had gone together, I was expecting the floor to do the same? But, some of the cuts were not accurate on the ends of the boards and some different widths. But at the end of the day it’s just a floor. (Note: Our floors come in generic packs and are not cut to fit specific cabins, that’s why we try to give you more than enough to floor your Log Cabin – We’re sorry you had difficulties! – Meg)

Newcastle Log Cabin Floor

I have now been in my new cabin for a month, during this time we haven’t had a drop of rain and 30+ degree temperatures! The cabin is drying out, but (so far) the wood is being extremely stable. The few small cracks that appeared as we installed it have (more or less) stayed as they were. Nothing has warped or buckled.

I really am being honest when I say, we are extremely pleased with our decision to buy a Tuin Log Cabin. Everything from start to finish has been great! I did have to call for a silly question and the aftersales help was brilliant – A big thank you to Alex and the Tuin team!

The Treated Newcastle Log Cabin

Finished!! 🙂


I must say, that shade of treatment really does suit the Newcastle Log Cabin! I’d just like to say a big thank you to Mr and Mrs C for their honest review of our products – We are sorry to hear that you had problems regarding the flooring, but are relieved that you still love your log cabin!

Interested in more reviews like Mr and Mrs C’s? You can find a load more at: Tuin Pictorial Customer Reviews.

Blackpool Log Cabin Feature

On the Blackpool Log Cabin product page, we show you plenty of images of our customer’s Log Cabin to show you what you can do with them. As well as all the fine details on the dimensions, technical tips as well as our quality checks for each Log Cabin.

But, understandably, that just doesn’t do the Log Cabin enough justice. That’s why on this page we’ve collected as many pictures, videos and detailed reviews as we can to create this customer feature page, so here goes:

Blackpool Log Cabin

The Blackpool Log Cabin , 58mm thick wood and double glazed windows and doors.

Made from 58mm slow grown Spruce timber, the Blackpool Log Cabin comes at a size of 4.4m x 3.4m. A perfect size for additional living areas, a home gym, home pub- even a garden office! Get plenty of natural light inside this Log Cabin with its full frontal double glazed doors and side windows. A durable building with its cost balancing out with future heating costs (especially if you add insulation!).

Reviews:

You dont have to just take our word, here are some excerpts from our many Blackpool Log Cabin Reviews – averaging out to five star ratings:

“The cabin itself is light and spacious, the window can be swapped on either side (the middle window pops off to make lifting it easier!). All the materials are really good quality and sturdy and the build itself was rather straightforward, with 3 of us on it, it took about 4 hours to get to the point of putting roof boards on!” – Mr A Bentham

“For the money, the Blackpool Cabin seems unbeatable, especially with free roof shingles – 58mm logs, spruce (superior to the ubiquitous pine), double glazed, metal door trim, higher end windows. The floor is not included which prompted me to use the slab as a floor, as suggested on the web site. Great suggestion which had not occurred to me.” – Mrs Y Clarke

“The Blackpool cabin is exceptionally high quality, finished to a really high standard and fitted together very quickly. I would recommend this cabin to anyone and am very happy with it for the price I paid. I had a few issues with the cabin whilst building it, but contacted Tuin who quickly responded and sorted the problems out without any fuss. i would recommend using them for both their quality of building materials and their response to help out with any issues i had.” – Mr Wagstaff

Among these reviews, we also received a detailed review from a customer who showed us with the use of images and narration their experience installing the Blackpool Log Cabin:

Installation: 

So long as you keep organised and follow suit of the information given on the Essential Installation Manual, as well as plenty of other Log Cabin Fitting Tips that are posted throughout the blog- written by our one and only, Richard.

Here are some of our favourite sets of installation images sent in by a customer:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Installed: 

When installed, there are endless ways in which you can treat/paint your Blackpool log cabin, here are some of our favourite examples:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Customer Pictures:

If you would like to see more photo’s from customers please click on the picture below – Note: This will take you to our customers photo gallery hosted by Google Photos. Pictures may show older models or customer own modifications.

Blackpool log cabin customer gallery

We asked a Tuin team member, Elizabeth, about what her favourite features of the Blackpool are- and why the UK market would love it too:

“I like the Blackpool Log Cabin for the amount of natural light that can come in through the front facing doors and additional windows on the size. They’re all double glazed so that along with the 58mm log thickness, I believe the Blackpool will store heat well. Because of the heat capacity and the amount of natural light coming in- I can see why a lot of our customers use them as garden offices” 

I was thinking the same, the cost of the cabin will balance out on heating costs over the years- but we recommend insulation in the roof and floor to make sure it really stays nice and cosy in the colder months!

Blackpool Log Cabin

The Blackpool Log Cabin , 58mm thick wood and double glazed windows and doors.

For more details such as precise measurements, pricing and a list of what will be included within the self build kit, please see the Blackpool Log Cabin product page.

If the Blackpool isn’t quite for you, why not take a look at the Aiste Log Cabin Showcase, or if you desire the 58mm log thickness- then the Stian Log Cabin might be more suitable.

Tuin Stian Log Cabin Review

I love it when customer join in on my blog and Dr K kindly sent in a review of his journey with his Stian 58mm Double Glazed Log Cabin, his comments after he sent it in made my day:


I’m glad that the reviews might be useful and would of course be happy for you to use them as you see fit.  Thank you for your generous offer, it’s very kind, although one of the main reasons that I chose Tuin above the various competition is your blog, partly as a useful resource, but also because of the honesty and detail, that you admit flaws and genuinely appear to care that your customers are happy and not mislead about them.  If I can contribute to that in some small way, I am happy to.

This is Dr K’s journey and review with an accompanying video that was made a little while after:

I am very happy with my Stian Log cabin. My intent was to use it as a workshop, but now that it’s built, I think it might end up being the second house at the bottom of our garden! I certainly don’t think that it will be any sort of refuge from the children – they love it.

The quality of the cabin is excellent – the 58mm logs are reassuringly substantial and the whole structure feels very solid. The one caveat on this is that the door-frame is not engineered to the same beautiful standard as the rest of the cabin. (As a word of advice, make sure you at least offer the doors up before you mount the frame – it is easy to get the two vertical panels swapped and upside down, which is annoying when you come to hang the doors. Don’t ask me how I know this.)

The service I have received from Tuin has been unimpeachable – the response times (at all times of day) are fantastic. There were two items in the pallet that had suffered minor damage; advice was given on how to repair and use one and a replacement for the other was quickly shipped.

The delivery service is pretty impressive. The delivery company were able to give me a pretty good estimate, on the day, of what time the lorry would arrive, which was useful and something that more mundane delivery companies could learn from. The lorry was huge and couldn’t get onto our little cul-de-sac, but that proved not to be a problem as the excellent fork-lift truck it came with, under the skilful control of the driver, was exceptionally manoeuvrable, could drive sideways and spin on the spot and managed to drop the (very large) pallet neatly on the drive.

delivery delivery-1

The pallet is cleverly packed to minimise the size, which is not inconsiderable (5.4m long, weighing 1.3tons!) although this does mean that the cabin jigsaw is pretty well shuffled.  

You really need to unpack it and sort the timber by type/length before you start the assembly.  Once you have done that, everything is pretty self-explanatory, although I would definitely watch all the instruction videos on the Tuin website.

Stian log cabin unpacked and ready to build

I looked at various sheds of similar basic design from other manufacturers, but I am happy that Tuin offered the best value for money out there. Reading the Tuin blog, there is a genuine passion for log cabins, things made of wood and for customer satisfaction that I found very refreshing and reassuring. There is a lot of useful technical insight there too – well worth reading.

Regarding the build, I would suggest that you don’t underestimate the amount of work involved – the construction of the cabin itself is a pretty straightforward (and really rather good fun) days work for two if you are basically fit and know how to swing a hammer without smashing your own fingers. That said, the preparatory work of clearing the ground, laying a proper (square and level) base, unpacking the pallet and sorting the timber is pretty taxing – it might be worth getting a builder involved if you haven’t done anything similar before.

Base for the log cabin

Base for the log cabin completed

In my case the total time taken so far is 4 days; 1.5 days to clear the site, put up square and level shuttering; 0.5 day to lay the concrete base; 1 day to erect the cabin, 1 day to fit the shingles.  I have yet to paint the cabin, but would imagine that will take another solid day..

Stian log cabin build

Stian 58mm log cabin almost complete

Stian log cabin completed other than the bargeboards

Stian log cabin completed other than the bargeboards

All in all this is an excellent product, from an excellent company and I am very happy with my purchase.

One final word of warning – you will engender shed envy in your friends and neighbours. Be warned!.

Thank you Dr K for your contribution to my blog. Reviews and insights help us and other customers greatly and it is very much appreciated. Please let me know when you would like to order the extra shingles we spoke about and we can apply the discount for you as a thank you.

Other customer experiences, build and ideas are here:Pictorial Tuin Reviews

Derby Log Cabin Tuin Review

It’s lovely when customers pass on their findings with their experience with their log cabin, as it helps other customers so much in understanding what they are letting themselves in for!

It also gives them ideas and thoughts on how best to complete their project and with what product. It’s also good for us to know if there have been any niggles or problems and to try address them for future customers.

Mr M was kind enough to send us a factual presentation of his building in a PowerPoint presentation, I have copied it below, it is for his new Derby 58mm Double Glazed Log Cabin


The Site

The following pages show the construction of our log cabin. The whole process took about 6 weeks, although it could all have been done much more quickly if I hadn’t been limited to weekends and holidays. The foundations took a week; putting up the walls (with windows and doors) took a day; the wooden roof (with insulation covered by shingles) took a couple of days; then lots of evenings painting, sanding, waxing, etc…

The log cabin was to stand in the corner of the garden, on sloping ground. The ground slopes away towards the fence at the back and there’s a height difference of about 18” from front to back. I first marked out the footprint of the cabin and cleared the turf.

Timber Frame

Foundations

I built a timber frame for the cabin to sit on.

The perimeter consists of 2”x6” timber (laminated together to form a base 4” wide to support the log cabin walls).  The floor joists (2”x4” are at 30cm centres and the whole thing sits on 4” posts concreted into the ground. (This took ages – I hadn’t finished them all when this photo was taken – the joists aren’t fixed here…)

The foundations for the log cabin

The foundations for the log cabin

This photo shows the height difference between the front and back of the cabin. Getting the posts level and square was a difficult (but important!) part of the build.

The joists are supported on joist hangers at the perimeter and on lengths
of 2”x4” that run across the foundations (attached to wooden posts). Two of these are visible in the picture – I put in another one before fixing the joists.

 

Timber frame base for the log cabin

Timber frame base for the log cabin

The Flat Pack Arrives!

The cabin arrived and was unloaded from the lorry with a forklift.

It’s a pretty impressive flat-pack!

I unpacked all the parts and separated them by length/type. This is best done by two people – most parts can be lifted by one person but the doors/windows and some of the longest logs need two people.

The log cabin arrives

The log cabin arrives

Walls Going Up

The walls went up very quickly. Once the first few layers are in place (and square), it’s an easy job.

The windows and doors are a little trickier. With the doors, I made one mistake – I didn’t put the door sill in-between the two side panels. I managed to fix this later. (The door sill wasn’t shown on the instructions but it’s obvious where it goes once you know what it is!)

Log cabin walls going up

Log cabin walls going up

Nearly There

Up to this point took perhaps 6 hours.

Nearly there in the build

Nearly there in the build

Doors

Getting the doors to meet in the middle was a bit of a challenge – not helped by the fact that I hadn’t noticed the door sill (see the silvery thing in the picture below!)

It probably took a couple of hours to get the doors hung properly – lots of adjustment of the hinges, which wasn’t difficult to do.

The door handle and lock were easy to fit.

Log cabin doors

Log cabin doors

Silvery thing - The door threshold

Silvery thing – The door threshold

Roof

The roof is made of more than 120 wooden slats, nailed to the purlins and the walls. Because we want to use the cabin in winter, I added 70mm thick insulation on top of the slats, with shingles nailed to the wood through the insulation. You can see the insulation in the picture below.

I had never used shingles before – they are great! They overlap to create a double layer and they look an awful lot better than shed felt.

Log cabin roof

Log cabin roof

Floor

Once the roof was finished, I put in the wooden floor, nailed to the joists. There’s a layer of 100mm insulation under the floor, fitted snugly between the floor joists.

After this photo was taken, I used a nail punch to make sure the nails all sat a few millimetres below the surface; I then sanded the floor. Then applied a sealing oil and finishing wax.

Log cabin floor

Log cabin floor

Fireplace

We wanted to put a wood burning stove in the cabin so I built a constructional hearth from concrete blocks. (I left a space 90cm x 90cm in the floor for this, i.e. the hearth foundations are on the ground, not on the timber frame).

Behind the stove, I fixed a layer of fire-proof board to the walls using batons. The photo shows the channels for the screws, which should allow the wall logs to expand and contract.

Allowance for expansion

Allowance for expansion

The hearth is finished with 2 slate slabs.

Behind the stove, the fire-proof board is tiled with stone tiles and the mantelpiece and wooden surround are made from off-cuts of fence posts! They are held together with Velcro(!) and the wood can be removed easily to allow access to the screws that fix the batons to the wall.

The stove was fitted by a HETAS approved engineer. The twin-skin flue goes straight up through the wooden roof.

Different stoves have different clearances to combustible materials – this one sits safely about 30cm in front of the wall.

Woodburning stove in a log cabin

Woodburning stove in a log cabin

Chimney flue

Chimney flue

Light

I installed a solar-powered light.

This was very fiddly! A solar panel on the roof charges a battery (which is stored in a ventilated box in the corner). There is a light switch by the door (not visible in the photo).

The light is great in the evenings – the single bulb is perfectly adequate for a cabin this size (roughly 4m square internally).

solar light

solar light

Finally

The outside of the cabin was painted with three layers of Sadolin.

I built a wooden deck in front of the doors.

The stove flue protrudes almost two metres above the roof to make sure there is sufficient up-draught.

Derby Log Cabin

Derby Log Cabin

Now that the cabin is built, we’re using it as an outdoor playroom.

Playroom log cabin

Playroom log cabin

There’s loads of room for furniture and it’s a lovely place to play or just to sit – especially in the Summer sun!

We’re looking forward to getting the stove going so that we can have a warm outdoor retreat in winter.

Review

Mr M was also kind enough to leave a review on the Derby 58mm log cabin, he wrote:

We bought a 58mm Derby Log Cabin (4m x 4m internally) a few weeks ago.

The quality of the cabin is excellent – the logs are cut very accurately and it’s very easy to put together (like Lego for grown-ups!). The whole thing is very solid. The instructions are minimal but it’s not difficult to work out what goes where if you take the time to sort ALL of the pieces in the pack first. The only problem I encountered was that the parts of the door frame weren’t on the plans and I ended up building the door frame and then having to re-assemble it when I realised I’d missed a bit! The shingles for the roof seem really sturdy and the finished cabin looks exactly like it does on the website. Excellent service too – thoroughly recommended.

Thank you Mr M

Thank you for taking the time to write this, it is very much appreciated and I hope you are pleased with the thank you present we sent you.

You may like to see what other customer experiences, build and ideas are here: Pictorial Tuin Reviews

Log Cuts in Log Cabins

This short article is the second in my timber series which tries to explain the types of timber we can use in log cabins. In this post I will try to explain how we can muck about with the timber to give you a really good price, but is it really good quality? Do you really want it?

The first in the series is here: Types of Timber in your Log Cabin

Timber Mills

I’ve already spoken about Spruce and Pine and their differences, now we can look at the actual log.

Logs arriving at the mill

Logs arriving at the mill

When the felled logs arrive at the mill an assessment is carried out on the best way to cut them for what ever uses have been specified. There are numerous different cuts for various reasons. It not simply a case of slicing them up. Wood is very expensive and the various parts of a log are worth varying amounts of money.

Parts of a Log

So lets look at this log:

Parts of a tree trunk

Parts of a tree trunk

There’s a few parts to it, each has it’s own properties and of course monetary value. It makes sense that the most valued part of the tree is the heartwood, this is the strongest part. It’s far more dense, it has less knots in it and is where all the full ‘goodness’ of the wood is.

This is the bit we like and are most interested in. This is the part that we make all of the posts from in the gazebos so we can be sure of the full strength, of course it does cause a few problems sometimes. Please see this post about the inherent problems of using this heartwood that sometimes a customer may see as a defect: Crack and splits in timber. However if we didn’t use it, and we used a different section and make a higher profit, your gazebo would not be half as strong. We’d be laughing to the bank but would you want that?

The heartwood is also the part Tuindeco will use for the log cabins but more on that a little later, lets keep looking at the log.

Best Bit of the Log

Lets look at our log again, we now know that the best and most expensive part is going to be the heartwood.  So as a mill we might look at this log and think to ourselves how we can cut it to provide the strongest piece and of course make the most money giving the highest grade of timber. Perhaps we’ll cut this from it:

Best and strongest part of a tree trunk for logs

Best and strongest part of a tree trunk for logs

With this we can take the most expensive piece and sell it at a premium and meet the Swedish Timber Grade of I – IV. We still have the rest of the log to play with and we can cut it up for all sorts of different uses meeting lower Swedish timber grades, maybe we could cut it like this:

Cuts you could possibly apply to a log

Cuts you could possibly apply to a log

There’s lots of technical terms we can use, Flitches, Deck, Board Scantlings etc. I’ll not bore you even more than maybe I am now.

Basically it means we’re cutting up the log to make the very best use of it. We’re cutting it to grades and to what we can get for it according to the buyers requirements and maybe their budget.

I found these images very interesting on the various cuts that can be found within a tree for various purposes:

Various types of cuts available from a log

Various types of cuts available from a log

As you can see there are lots of different ways to cut it, it gets even more technical and in another post I can blabber away about how we cut it to ensure knots do not fall out (Re-Sawn). Or how we ensure the very heart is cut to remain totally straight throughout the length of the final log cabin log.

Log Cabin Differences

I’ve seen another supplier of log cabins talk about differences in various log cabins. They are however completely missing the point. Double glazing and locks, roofing materials and sizes really are not the point when it comes to the buildings.

The ONLY thing that matters is the type of timber used, the quality of it, where it is from and where it is cut from within a log. And of course the moisture content (another post will deal with this) Moisture content makes a HUGE difference to the timber used in a log cabin.

Windows and doors, fancy locks, glazing, roofing etc is very superfluous and will not have any bearing on the quality or longevity. The timber is the important part and in my opinion the only part to worry about when you are researching or buying a log cabin.

The Log Cabin Cut

OK, lets assume you’re out to buy a log cabin, you’ve got cash to spend and maybe you can go direct to the timber mills and maybe even you can go direct to the factory. First I suspect you want the best timber, we’ve already talked about timber before: Types of Timber in a log cabin. and maybe you can get to the forest to select the best trees in the right location. You may have already known about how to get cheap log cabins.

BUT now you can make it even cheaper and really get the price to where you want it. Maybe you are a UK supplier out to blast the market with you super duper best price log cabin

So why not use these cuts from a log and ask them to make the logs from them? This would be super cheap, probably about 20 – 40% cheaper :

Logs you could take from a tree trunk

Logs you could take from a tree trunk

Blimey, you’d make a killing! Your Log cabin would be way cheaper than anyone else, You’d sell LOADS

This is exactly what some suppliers will do, the outside of a tree is about 20% less weight than the inside, it makes for a cheaper building and certainly looks right on paper. You can even quote a Swedish log quality (above V but would you know the difference?). Kiln dried, really super duper! All the customers would think they have the UK’s best deal! WOOHOO!

By the way, I heard a quote recently from a very good friend in the industry. He said: “I can make a log cabin to any price you want. You want cheap? You will sell hundreds in the first few weeks but never answer the phone again!”

We would like to answer the phone this year and next and the year after……

But really what do you want? If you were at the mill and knew all of the above what would you really want?  Maybe this cut or are you not that bothered?

Inside cuts for a log cabin

Inside cuts for a log cabin

Tuindeco International BV produce cabins from the heart, literally and in both senses of the word. I once wrote a post ages ago about questions to ask a log cabin supplierr. Please now also add this question: “Where is the cut of your logs from?”

Timber Series

Following on from this I intend to write a short series on timber in log cabins, you really wouldn’t believe the differences and the ways we can play with wood to get to the prices you the consumer wants but, do you really want it in the long term?

The first in the series is here: Types of Timber in your Log Cabin

The following will be added to this blog over time:

  1. How we can cut a timber log to make a cheap log cabin.
  2. Moisture content in timber, machining and the impact of the content.
  3. Timber calculation to cut costs you can work out yourself and see where you maybe opting for a bargain while adding to a companies profits.
  4. More expansion information for log cabins.
  5. The pitfalls of thinner logs, barge-boards, windows and doors.
  6. Drying processes – kiln dried versus natural drying.

Rorik ideal as an office Log Cabin

Brand new on this week is a lovely building recently been designed for our Private Label Range of Log Cabins.

The Rorik Log Cabin is in 58mm wall logs and is double glazed and perfect for use as a garden office, we’ve purposefully kept the side walls free of windows so there is maximum space for desks, cabinets, shelves etc normally found in a garden office.

It’s cheap too!  In fact I can’t find anything similar at the price it is.  Some garden office suppliers charge fortunes but you can create exactly the same thing with the addition of insulation in the roof and floor.  Using at least 50mm Celotex or similar will give you an equal R value all around.

A handy log cabin being 4.0m x 4.0m, up to now we’ve only had this size in the standard range of 34mm or 28mm wall logs.  This make a nice addition.  To the front is a good sized canopy of 1.40m which gives the occupant inside a good layer of shade.  With the addition of some decking boards this will also make a lovely veranda.

I do think this will become a best seller of ours, it may even make it into the catalogue next year.

The New Rorik Garden Office Log Cabin in 58mm logs

The new Rorik 58mm log cabin, a perfect sized building to make a great garden office