Jos Log Cabin Customer Review

Hi everyone!

It’s getting closer to the end of the year – But it’s great to see customers who are still installing their Log Cabins, even with the temperamental weather in the UK. For example Mr M – Who has very kindly sent in some pictures of their Jos Log Cabin installation, which has been transferred into a cosy Gin Hut!


Mr M writes as follows:

The Jos Log Cabin, Safely Delivered

The arrival of my Jos corner cabin. Delivered by friendly/skilled forklift driver who even managed to unload into the garage. Worth taking the time to check off the materials list prior to assembly. We’ll protected packaging with materials to spare. (Note – We recommend this within our T&C too!)

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

These rot proof packers are worth considering and helped me out greatly throughout my build. After spending great effort ensuring a near level slab base I still used these packers to take up any gap such as the slight skirting to slab edging. I would always recommend a wet mix of sand and cement rather than dry.

Log Cabin Foundation Beams

Use a DPM under the foundation beams for further protection

Then I cut and filed down the tongue. Screw fixing of first wall panels. 2 per board is an ample amount, screwing them approx 150mm from ends .From this point assembly is quick. I clear coated all tongue and grooves throughout. Note the space which I left for required annual wood preserving. This is essential in prolonging the life of your cabin. Don’t be tempted to squeeze into a corner to maximise space!

Jos Log Cabin Installation

Build coming along, wood preserving as I went. This helps maintain the cabin colour from expected expansion/contraction movement particularly in 1st seasonal settlement. Note the upside down section of door frame top. My tip and is best practiced throughout construction – place prior to securing. This was easily corrected later in the build and then squared and secured.

Installing the Jos Log Cabin

Time for the roof. The roofing timber was less awkward than expected, beams to kingpin are pre-angle cut- a job made easier with another pair of hands. I chose to add further protection by stapling in more DPM sheeting prior to shingles. I also decided to use the 75mm board from delivery pallet rather than the 40mm barge boards supplied. I reckon it is better proportioned to the final look of the roof. Time spent on the double angle cut where boards meet. Cut with green and trial fit to achieve best fit.

Installing the Jos Log Cabin Roof

Shingles on! Choose a dry day so as not to trap moisture and preferably a day warm enough to bond the bitumen strip. Watching the pyramid roof shingles video Tuin provide was particular helpful.

Pyramid Roof Shingles

I decided to further weather seal the foundation by adding folded sheet metal. This was bonded to slab using sikaflex EBT external sealant then primed and oil base coated.

Metal Foundation Cover

Floor time! More DPM sheeting and floor joists approx 300mm apart. Note more use of glazier packers to help level out the base.

Jos Log Cabin Floor Joists

You could also use off cuts of shingles if required.

Jablite boarding to help insulate underfoot… I purchased the optional 27mm flooring. Ensure the flooring is nailed tight with approx 10mm gap all around acting as a floating floor.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The window latches were installed with more glazier packers to help centralise to frame. Off setting the second pin was another helpful tip from Tuin to add better seal when window in closed position.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Personalised wee gin den! I also picked up from previous customer review about finishing above the door with edging. A nice finishing touch.

Gin Pub Sign

A great way to lay the rules straight for gin.

Project complete. So happy with the cabin Tuin supplied. I decided to go with a preserver which was in keeping with our house. There are some lovely new colour choices in wood preserving but I opted for the more traditional look showing the beauty in natural wood, knots n’ all.

The Completed Jos Log Cabin

Don’t be frightened to have a go, and don’t rush your build, enjoy it! Some reviews mention about done in 2 days etc… Yes you can assemble quick but my advice is to allow for several good quality preserving coats remembering to take into account drying times and unpredictable weather. Protect as you go and don’t feel rushed into completing.

I hope this review gives you some useful pointers and demonstrates the well built garden spaces Tuin provide. Well done Tuin for having such a fantastic range of product and very reasonably priced. Your product deserves the time and feedback to allow you continued success within your field.

… Now time to enjoy our new space with a gin or few!


Some very handy tips in this review, I love the sign above the cabin door! The end product shows how perfectly the Jos Log Cabin can become a cosy Gin Hut for two, truly marvelous! Thank you again for sending this in.

Interested in more reviews like Mr M’s? You can find more with a range of cabins at: Tuin Pictorial Customer Reviews.

Daisy Log Cabin and Annexe Show Site Build

Hello everyone! So, while I (Meg) was out of the office for a week, the office still continued to work non stop! I came back to christmas decorations everywhere and a new showsite install! At first I was a bit disappointed the installation of the Daisy Log Cabin and 28mm Side Annex without me but one of our new/training sales assistants, Becky, told me she carried out some of the installation! Its an excellent way to learn about our products and how they are installed and she was even so kind enough to do her own write up about it for you guys!


Becky writes as follows: 

I’m new to the Tuin team and wanted to get hands on in the assembly of a log cabin to gain a better understanding of the process behind it, enabling myself to then be able to give personal and experienced advice to our customers as part of the Sales Team.

I would just like to point out that when I started I had absolutely zero DIY knowledge, skills or experience.
Furthermore assembling the cabin in the cold, rain and snow was also an experience, although it was a great opportunity to prove that bad weather never hinders the construction of a cabin, apart from my cold fingers!
Additionally, I can confidently say that building a cabin is not as hard as I first believed. Once you know what you’re doing, everything just slots together and before you know it it’s up!

On my third week of training I was given the opportunity to construct the roof on the Daisy and build the annexe on the side.
I put up my step ladder inside the cabin alongside one of our more experienced members of the team and together we fitted the roof of the Daisy. It was all tongue and groove so the pieces of timber literally just slotted together and then we nailed it in.
For starters I had never even held a hammer before this point let alone hammer roof nails in!

Roofboard Installation

Seems like the sun came out to give you the perfect selfie lighting- The roof behind you is looking great!

The further along the roof we went the space to put up the ladder was running out, it was time to get on top of the roof!
I was surprised at how sturdy it actually was because I was prepared to be falling through. So there I was at the end of November on my knees nailing on the roof boards. (Though because I was the one to put my name in to helping.. I did make sure to wrap up! It was just very cold haha)
In between multiple cups of coffee purely to warm up my insides, the roof was on.
It was a good opportunity to gain an understanding of the natural contraction and expansion of timber. But with a firm knock into place the roof looked pretty good if I do say myself.

Log Cabin Wall With Coffee

You look energised for your future tasks thanks to coffee!

Then came the shingles, what I perceived to be the next challenge but they in fact were also very easy to do! We started from the bottom of the roof, with the first set upside down to ensure coverage of the roof, and from then on worked our way up to the ridge.

I was then trusted enough to build the annexe by myself. Just me, the timber and the plans…

Firstly I made a level base with just three pieces of tanalised timber, I secured the annexe base using screws and then screwed the base into the side foundation beam of the Daisy Log Cabin; ensuring my base was 100% flat, level and square I was all set to go.
The starter half logs are simply put normal logs just cut in half so that they have a flat bottom, making it easy to sit on top of the foundation beams. You don’t have to, but I screwed these onto the foundation beams just for extra stability.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

From here on the rest of the logs just slotted on top of each other, about five logs up I stopped and lowered the door into place. I was clear to see that it was a good thing I didn’t go any higher as I wouldn’t have been able to lift the door up high enough to slide it into place. From here I continued to knock the rest of the logs on top of each other.
Then it came to the roof, which was pretty much exactly the same as the Daisy Log Cabin but thankfully not as high.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

I started from the front of the annexe and worked my way towards the back, The roof boards were also tongue and groove making it nice and easy for them to all slot together. I was nailing these in as I went two at the top, middle and bottom onto the purlins.

It’s not quite finished yet, just the shingles to go, but overall it was an enjoyable first experience of building a Log Cabin and Annexe. By continuously referring back to the plans and taking my time to make sure it was all accurately in place, I was very successful.
It really emphasised to me how important it is not to look at all of the bits of timber and panic, because by following all of the steps, checking the plans regularly and taking it bit by bit it’s actually very easy to do. My new nickname is now ‘Becky the Builder’.

Just awaiting my next Cabin to construct! 🙂


Some superb work Becky! An excellent addition to the show site, and thank you for telling us how it all went, I’m glad you’re looking forward to your next installation!

You can start your next DIY adventure with the Daisy Log Cabin and the 28mm Side Annex available on our site.

To read more about our showsite installations, there are also ones on the Kennet Log Cabin and the Lennart Log Cabin installation blogs!

Asmund Log Cabin Review – Mr Francis

Some of our customers a lovely people and we love these people, it makes business such a pleasure. Mr Francis is one of these people and has sent us in this great review of his Asmund ‘Man Cave’ log cabin:


Ha ha, how funny…. Currently sat in my Tuin log cabin (aka the man cave) watching a movie via the projector and full cinema sound system…. When an email popped in inviting me to write a review…..

My wife recently asked me “will you be spending any time in the house” ummmmm no…. I quite like it in here….

I bought the 3m x 3m Asmund log cabin with optional floor, which we installed in the bottom of our garden where it was pretty much dead space. Home office and family movie room was the plan and I have used it every day since it has been watertight! I’m an early riser and will often be out here at 4ish in the morning, fan heater on, cup of coffee and I get to watch the world wake up through the generously proportioned windows.

Construction was pretty easy, I had to put a few calls into the Tuin team to clarify bits and pieces, they were a great support.

The “ultimate flat pack” arrived and for once, I held my horses and read and then re-read the construction tips. It is a very, very good idea to photocopy the plans onto single A4 sheets, laminate and tape them together with the overview sketch of the cabin in the middle (to keep in mind what the finished article should look like) and each wall taped on the side of the paper representing where the actual wall is, this way you have “perspective” and can 3d model in your mind.

Laminated Log Cabin plans

Laminated Log Cabin plans

Lay the associated bits for each wall in their own piles…. It makes life a lot easier.

I bought water, rather than solvent based decking treatment from screw fix. Prevents dryrot and all the other stuff… It enabled me to paint the boards as they went on… So every square mm of wood, including the tongue and grooves before being placed together has at least one coating of preservative….

Single handed Asmund log cabin build

Single handed Asmund log cabin build

I put the thing together single handed…. Fitting the roof beams was fun, but some clever thinking with a step ladder, washing pole and some clamps got the job done, you just have to be patient and creative! 

Creative log cabin building for those on their own.

Creative log cabin building for those on their own.

It is such a nice place to be, fits together lovely, doors flush in the frame, windows easy to operate, the floor has been sat on insulation board and I am planning for a log burner to be installed

Stunning at night!

Stunning at night!

I have now hidden the cables for the 12v lighting! 

Hidden electric cables

Hidden electric cables

 Family have to ring to enter the man cave! 

Ring for entry into the man cave!

Ring for entry into the man cave!

 Running the electrics and network cable…. Got the armoured cable myself, laid it and then had an electrician terminate the ends and certify it.

electrics

A nice place to be….!

image (10)

Recycled desk made from the pallet the log cabin was shipped on and left over floor boards! Get creative….

Recycled Pallet form the Log cabin delivery!

Recycled Pallet form the Log cabin delivery!

image (12)

Movie night in the man cave!

It was a lot of fun building it, very easy and it is paying dividends now!

asmund-cinema

Thank you Mr Francis, you’ve definitely won one of our goody boxes. Enjoy your ‘Man Cave’ Asmund Log Cabin.

Log Cuts in Log Cabins

This short article is the second in my timber series which tries to explain the types of timber we can use in log cabins. In this post I will try to explain how we can muck about with the timber to give you a really good price, but is it really good quality? Do you really want it?

The first in the series is here: Types of Timber in your Log Cabin

Timber Mills

I’ve already spoken about Spruce and Pine and their differences, now we can look at the actual log.

Logs arriving at the mill

Logs arriving at the mill

When the felled logs arrive at the mill an assessment is carried out on the best way to cut them for what ever uses have been specified. There are numerous different cuts for various reasons. It not simply a case of slicing them up. Wood is very expensive and the various parts of a log are worth varying amounts of money.

Parts of a Log

So lets look at this log:

Parts of a tree trunk

Parts of a tree trunk

There’s a few parts to it, each has it’s own properties and of course monetary value. It makes sense that the most valued part of the tree is the heartwood, this is the strongest part. It’s far more dense, it has less knots in it and is where all the full ‘goodness’ of the wood is.

This is the bit we like and are most interested in. This is the part that we make all of the posts from in the gazebos so we can be sure of the full strength, of course it does cause a few problems sometimes. Please see this post about the inherent problems of using this heartwood that sometimes a customer may see as a defect: Crack and splits in timber. However if we didn’t use it, and we used a different section and make a higher profit, your gazebo would not be half as strong. We’d be laughing to the bank but would you want that?

The heartwood is also the part Tuindeco will use for the log cabins but more on that a little later, lets keep looking at the log.

Best Bit of the Log

Lets look at our log again, we now know that the best and most expensive part is going to be the heartwood.  So as a mill we might look at this log and think to ourselves how we can cut it to provide the strongest piece and of course make the most money giving the highest grade of timber. Perhaps we’ll cut this from it:

Best and strongest part of a tree trunk for logs

Best and strongest part of a tree trunk for logs

With this we can take the most expensive piece and sell it at a premium and meet the Swedish Timber Grade of I – IV. We still have the rest of the log to play with and we can cut it up for all sorts of different uses meeting lower Swedish timber grades, maybe we could cut it like this:

Cuts you could possibly apply to a log

Cuts you could possibly apply to a log

There’s lots of technical terms we can use, Flitches, Deck, Board Scantlings etc. I’ll not bore you even more than maybe I am now.

Basically it means we’re cutting up the log to make the very best use of it. We’re cutting it to grades and to what we can get for it according to the buyers requirements and maybe their budget.

I found these images very interesting on the various cuts that can be found within a tree for various purposes:

Various types of cuts available from a log

Various types of cuts available from a log

As you can see there are lots of different ways to cut it, it gets even more technical and in another post I can blabber away about how we cut it to ensure knots do not fall out (Re-Sawn). Or how we ensure the very heart is cut to remain totally straight throughout the length of the final log cabin log.

Log Cabin Differences

I’ve seen another supplier of log cabins talk about differences in various log cabins. They are however completely missing the point. Double glazing and locks, roofing materials and sizes really are not the point when it comes to the buildings.

The ONLY thing that matters is the type of timber used, the quality of it, where it is from and where it is cut from within a log. And of course the moisture content (another post will deal with this) Moisture content makes a HUGE difference to the timber used in a log cabin.

Windows and doors, fancy locks, glazing, roofing etc is very superfluous and will not have any bearing on the quality or longevity. The timber is the important part and in my opinion the only part to worry about when you are researching or buying a log cabin.

The Log Cabin Cut

OK, lets assume you’re out to buy a log cabin, you’ve got cash to spend and maybe you can go direct to the timber mills and maybe even you can go direct to the factory. First I suspect you want the best timber, we’ve already talked about timber before: Types of Timber in a log cabin. and maybe you can get to the forest to select the best trees in the right location. You may have already known about how to get cheap log cabins.

BUT now you can make it even cheaper and really get the price to where you want it. Maybe you are a UK supplier out to blast the market with you super duper best price log cabin

So why not use these cuts from a log and ask them to make the logs from them? This would be super cheap, probably about 20 – 40% cheaper :

Logs you could take from a tree trunk

Logs you could take from a tree trunk

Blimey, you’d make a killing! Your Log cabin would be way cheaper than anyone else, You’d sell LOADS

This is exactly what some suppliers will do, the outside of a tree is about 20% less weight than the inside, it makes for a cheaper building and certainly looks right on paper. You can even quote a Swedish log quality (above V but would you know the difference?). Kiln dried, really super duper! All the customers would think they have the UK’s best deal! WOOHOO!

By the way, I heard a quote recently from a very good friend in the industry. He said: “I can make a log cabin to any price you want. You want cheap? You will sell hundreds in the first few weeks but never answer the phone again!”

We would like to answer the phone this year and next and the year after……

But really what do you want? If you were at the mill and knew all of the above what would you really want?  Maybe this cut or are you not that bothered?

Inside cuts for a log cabin

Inside cuts for a log cabin

Tuindeco International BV produce cabins from the heart, literally and in both senses of the word. I once wrote a post ages ago about questions to ask a log cabin supplierr. Please now also add this question: “Where is the cut of your logs from?”

Timber Series

Following on from this I intend to write a short series on timber in log cabins, you really wouldn’t believe the differences and the ways we can play with wood to get to the prices you the consumer wants but, do you really want it in the long term?

The first in the series is here: Types of Timber in your Log Cabin

The following will be added to this blog over time:

  1. How we can cut a timber log to make a cheap log cabin.
  2. Moisture content in timber, machining and the impact of the content.
  3. Timber calculation to cut costs you can work out yourself and see where you maybe opting for a bargain while adding to a companies profits.
  4. More expansion information for log cabins.
  5. The pitfalls of thinner logs, barge-boards, windows and doors.
  6. Drying processes – kiln dried versus natural drying.

Bargain Sigrid Log Cabin

UPDATED 26.1.14 – Sorry this offer is CLOSED

How about a really cheap log cabin deal?  It’s one of our popular designs but is slightly different to that of the catalogue version which is the Sigrid corner log cabin.  This one, rather imaginatively, we’re calling the Sigrid OFFER log cabin and is part of overstock destined for a Belgian private label retailer.

Made from 28mm wall logs and dimensions of 4.4 x 3.0m this represents excellent value for money at £***.  I had a quick wander around the net a little while ago and I challenge you to find anything that comes close to this price for this size and style of building because I couldn’t!

The Sigrid has always been a popular corner log cabin, it’s obvious why as it can be used nicely in the corner of a garden, you have a summerhouse area and then the benefit of a shed storage area, two buildings in one really.

We do only have a very limited number of these available in the UK and I don’t expect them to last long at all.  The normal Sigrid log cabin is priced incredibly well but at nearly £*** cheaper this is truly a bargain and can truly be described as a ‘Cheap Log Cabin‘ without actually being cheap quality!  If you’re looking for a cabin of this style and dimensions you should order it quickly.

There is one downside though which is a great shame.  Unlike the catalogue, normal Sigrid Log Cabin we sell which can be installed either left or right:

Catalogue Sigrid Log Cabin can be installed left or right handed

Catalogue Sigrid Log Cabin can be installed left or right handed

The normal Sigrid can be installed either left or right as above

The normal Sigrid can be installed either left or right as above

Unfortunately our special offer private label cabin cannot be and can only be installed this way:

Offer Sigrid can only be installed in this configuration.

Offer Sigrid can only be installed in this configuration.

A bit of a shame really.  But, if this suits you then you have found yourself a bargain Sir!

Clever Customer

Some of our customers are extremely resourceful!  Mr Smit bought one of our Ingrid Log Cabins and because of the planning regulation and how close he was to his boundary he realised it had to be at the 2.5m height.  Of course he realised how cheap our log cabin was and could not found anything to match it.  So, with a little ingenuity and adaptation he produced this:

The Ingrid Log Cabin adapted by a clever customer and an inspiration for a new UK building.

The Ingrid Log Cabin adapted by a clever customer and an inspiration for a new UK building.

We were mightily impressed, it’s a really professional job, it didn’t take too much adapting either.

We’ve taken it on board though and have just put in an order with Holland for a UK specific Ingrid, one that’s at the 2.5m height so our customers don’t have to be quite so ingenious again.

Update: Due to this building we now build the Asmund 28mm Log Cabin and also the Emma 40mm Log Cabin 

Thank you Mr Smit for the idea and inspiration.

Log Cabin in Skye

We have been sent a picture of one of our log cabins after it’s arrival at it’s new home in  the Isle of Skye.    The picture shows it being off loaded to a back drop of sprawling mountains.  Look to the right though and you’ll see a lovely little hut, the image doesn’t show what it really is but I’ve fallen in love with it.  So much so I gave the lovely lady a good deal and am looking forward to a night away.

Here’ s the picture we were sent:

One of our log cabins in Skye

One of our log cabins in Skye

The little green hut is a Shepherd hut.  Our customer takes paying guests and you can stay in them and what an amazing location to stay in let alone the wonderful hut.  This is the link to their facebook page, have a look and book up.  https://www.facebook.com/SkyeShepherdHuts  If you stay there before I do let me know the treat in store for me.

I can’t write a post without promoting our products, it wouldn’t be right,  so, this is the building Skye Shepherd huts bought.  It’s going to be used as BBQ log cabin so the visitors can enjoy an al fresco supper with a firepit close.

Britt Log Cabin

Britt Log Cabin

 

Britt log cabin, measuring 3m x 2.5m and perfect for use as a BBQ hut, especially in the Isle of Skye.