Log Cabin Glass Removal

Log Cabin glass removal – You may have a need to remove the glass from your doors or windows for maintenance or to paint behind. Most log cabins will have removable beading on the frame and it’s pretty straightforward to remove.

Below is how I remove the glass without causing any damage which may help you should you wish to take yours out for whatever reason, it’s straightforward to do and takes a few minutes to accomplish.

If the beading has already been painted then firstly score down the beading with a sharp knife to penetrate the treatment.

If the beading has already been painted then firstly score down the beading with a sharp knife to penetrate the treatment.

Using a small flat blade screw driver or similar this can be pushed down the side of the bead, work along and the pins holding the bead will become loose.

Using a small flat blade screwdriver or similar this can be pushed down the side of the bead, work along and the pins holding the bead will become loose.

Gently lever out the bead.

Gently lever out the bead.

Continue around the other beads, first score the bead to break the treatment seal as before.

Continue around the other beads, first score the bead to break the treatment seal as before.

The bead once loosened can be easily removed.

The bead once loosened can be easily removed.

Lever off the other beads using a small flat blade screwdriver.

Lever off the other beads using a small flat blade screwdriver. I prefer to put the beads in order of how you took them out. Doors are windows are hand made so there may be some minor variations in each bead.

With the beads removed the glass can be taken out to allow you to replace it or treat behind for aesthetics and longevity.

With the beads removed the glass can be taken out to allow you to replace it or treat behind for aesthetics and longevity. Please note it maybe necessary to use a sharp blade behind the glass and frame to break the seal of any sealant used.

Refitting the glass is the reverse of taking it out. If you wished to you could add a bead of silicone sealant although this is not necessary.

Refitting the glass is the reverse of taking it out. If you wished to you could add a bead of silicone sealant although this is not necessary.

Using a hammer tap the pins through the beads so the bead can be easily fitted.

Using a hammer tap the pins through the beads so the bead can be easily fitted.

Place the glass back into the frame and start to refit the beads.

Place the glass back into the frame and start to refit the beads.

Refitting the beads.

Refitting the beads.

Tap the pins into the frame, Depending on the type of bead it is often easier to slide your hammer head along the glass.

Tap the pins into the frame, Depending on the type of bead it is often easier to slide your hammer head along the glass.

With the glass replaced you can wipe off any finger marks or stray sealant if you decided to use any.

With the glass replaced you can wipe off any finger marks or stray sealant if you decided to use any.

To finish, retreat the beads if you have already painted the log cabin.

To finish, retreat the beads if you have already painted the log cabin.

Please Note:

As with any DIY project you need to give full consideration to your safety and those around you. Therefore I recommend wearing safety equipment such as goggles and gloves while removing the glass and taking all care and consideration whilst doing so.
This concludes our Log Cabin glass removal guide- For any other questions and concerns please email in.

This entry was posted in Log Cabin Fitting Tips and tagged , , , by Richard. Bookmark the permalink.

About Richard

This blog is my personal platform which I do enjoy. It is my own viewpoint and my own ideas. I may not be right and other installers / experts may offer a different view point or a alternative way to do something. I welcome contributions from anybody experienced to do so.

All my blog writing is MY OWN personal opinion ONLY and is NOT always the opinion of TUIN | TUINDECO as a company.

Log Cabins and Garden timber have a myriad of intricacies , I love to give away the secrets, there are a lot!

I enjoy using this blog to expose them so you know what you are buying. I love to know I am causing a few problems in the industry as it can be on occasions less than honest.

I actively encourage everyone to install their own buildings. So many times I would fit and the company I was working for would charge loads for my time, only then to be faced with the embarrassment when the customer says 'I could have done that' and YES you can without paying hundreds of Pounds!

I have over 19 years experience within the garden timber industry. I have particular expertise in garden buildings including the manufacture, design and installation from sheds to log cabins and all the way up to timber framed houses.

In my time I have been involved with virtually every manufacturer and supplier of garden buildings. I have also installed pretty much every make of Garden Building there is from ALL suppliers and manufacturers.

Prior to my career change I was a Watch Commander in the Fire Service with particular expertise in chemical incidents, training, technical design / technology / IT /Procedures / ISO Systems and road traffic accidents. I retired due to a nasty injury after 20 years service.

During my time in the Fire Service, on my days off, I was a self employed fitter for any type of garden building, I worked with most of the well known companies as a subcontractor.

I now work with Tuin | Tuindeco in the UK, supporting and advising on the vast range of products. I keep an eye out for help requests when we a supposed to be closed and can usually get back to you out of hours via email only (wife and children permitting on my days off).

In my private life I consult as an independent expert assessor for companies or private individuals when a dispute is present over their structure which results in producing an impartial report and assessment for whoever requires it. This is often higher valued than a structural engineers report born from my credentials, experience and widely recognised as an 'Expert' in the field.

I am a freelance writer for numerous companies, publications and blogs as well as an independent expert and fault finder for parts of the Industry and consumers with a particular emphasis on timber structures, both framed and of an interlocking design such as log cabins.

I produce numerous articles about timber in general, information on general timber products and specific guides when needed. I hope you enjoy and find my writing useful.

Please contribute and comment to my posts as you would like and I will try to respond as best I can.

Thank you

Richard.

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