Tuin 2019 Catalogue Feature

Hello everyone! So as you may be aware- It’s coming up to the season where we start making the finishing touches to our new catalogue! When these are all completed we will work hard to put the products on our website for you to browse and order. However, in the meantime I have created this snippet showcase of some of the products we are excited about for the upcoming year.

If you did want to have a sneaky peak our Tuin 2019 Catalogue is available to read online whilst the physical copies are in print. Please note that your device will need Adobe Flash to open the online brochure.

Now, let me show you the products that I am most looking forward to:

Garden Furniture:

We’re always thinking of ways to improve our Garden Furniture, from comfort to the prevention of mould growing from damp cushions. This is why we have expanded our aluminum framed range and implemented a powerful combination of Textilene fabric with Quickdry foam cushions.

Textilene is a PVC coated woven polyester, formulated to withstand the most severe weather conditions as well as wear and tear for many years of outdoor use- all with minimal maintenance needed! Quickdry foam has been specifically designed for outdoor use, unlike normal foam, Quickdry foam drains water quickly allowing cushions to dry faster and prevent mould growth.

 

Colorado Springs Garden Lounge

Clean in design, the Colorado Springs set is split up into separate modules. Allowing you to do a ‘Pick ‘N Mix’ selection and build your own custom lounge set. Paired with Textilene material and Quickdry cushions, you can sit in the sun with comfort – Along with the metal butler trays on some modules, so you don’t have to worry about if your drink will topple over.

 

Montgomery Garden Dining Set

Dine in the sun with the Montgomery dining set featuring six chairs made from aluminum framing along with a 2m long table to fit all the dishes. You can relax knowing that your Montgomery lounge set won’t stay wet for hours, even days.

Fermont Balcony Furniture Set

Have you been dreaming of one of our Love Seats but don’t have the space for the whole width? A simple yet elegant furniture set, the Fermont may be the solution. The simplicity gives this garden furniture set a striking appeal, ideal under a veranda or on your balcony to make star gazing more comfortable.

We’re also taking a trip down memory lane and giving you 90s vibes with this Teak lounge set, the Riverside

Riverside Teak Garden Lounge Set

Quirky in design, the Riverside set is split up into separate modules. Allowing you to do a ‘Pick ‘N Mix’ selection and build your own custom lounge set. Made from the very appealing Teak timber to ensure a long lasting lounge set for years of use in your garden.

Fencing:

We also have some new additions to our Garden Fencing range – The most notable ones are made out of Larch timber, which is always stunning in colour and durability.

Klagenfurt Garden Fence

Modern in design, but effective – The Klagenfurt garden fence features 28 smoothly planed boards in each fence panel. Creating this smooth but busy looking fence panel, perfect for keeping your garden to yourself and blocking the outside world out.

Log Cabins:

Compared to our 2018 Catalogue Feature – There aren’t as many Log Cabins added to the range, but we have continued to expand our selection to help you find the perfect Log Cabin for your garden. However, meet the new additions to our 40mm and 70mm Log Cabin ranges:

Tane Log Cabin

Featuring an asymmetrical apex roof – The Tane Log Cabin provides customers the best compromise between price and heat capacity, being made from 40mm logs and double glazed windows. Paired with some insulation in the floor and roof, you will have the perfect start to your own, quirky summerhouse.

Ennis Log Cabin

Made from 70mm thick logs, the Ennis Log Cabin is an ideal cabin for overnight accomodation, or the ideal base for your home business. Measuring at 5.3m x 5.4m, the Ennis is made up of four internal rooms to allow the essentials to have it’s own designated space.

Letterkenny Log Cabin

Do you want a Log Cabin that’s filled with natural lighting? Then the Letterkenny Log Cabin may be just what you’re looking for. With a total of ten tempered double glazed windows around the front and back of the cabin, as well as the doors featuring glass fronts – It’ll be safe to say that when paired with the right location, natural light will brighten up all four rooms of this Cabin. Perfect for lakeside accommodation, or an office that overlooks the countryside!

Shepherds Huts:

That’s not all guys, to finish this post off I’d also like to show you one of our new additions to our Shepherd’s Hut range:

Gypsy Wagon XL

Gypsy Wagon XL

With the same classic design as our Shepherds Hut – Gypsy Wagon model, the Gypsy Wagon XL has a total with of 8.2m! Perfect for those who love to transform their Shepherd Huts into overnight accommodation. The Gypsy Wagon XL is also compatible with our Shepherds Hut Accessories, allowing you to add internal partitions, extra access and more.


And this is just a few of our new products for 2019 – Personally I’m the most excited about the new additions to our Shepherd’s Hut range, as well as the way our customers transform them! What are you looking forward to the most from this new catalogue?

Of course I can’t spoil everything for you, but if you just can’t wait any longer to find out you can read through our Tuin 2019 Online Catalogue.

We hope that 2019 will bring us new and returning customers to surprise and delight with again and again!

Tuin’s Trip To Tuindeco 2018

Hello everyone, Megan here!

Some of us here at Tuin have recently taken a trip across the water to Tuindeco, who are based in Coevorden, Netherlands. The aim for my attendance to this trip was to learn more about Tuindeco and our business practices, so that I can gain insight as to what made them become one of the biggest competitors in the Log Cabin industry.

So, after the ferry trip that consisted of napping, eating Bitterballen (Highly recommended by the way) and a drive to Coevorden, we arrive at the office of Tuindeco. Where we’re met with a large showsite and friendly employees, including the owner of Tuindeco. We were soon into discussion of the actions they implemented over the winter to ensure a successful collection of cabins ready to sell, which I’ll show you in a moment.

Winter can be a rough time in this business, with the sawmills running low of wood and struggling to supply it with the demand of companies wanting to restock their Cabins ready for the busy summer period. Tuindeco came up with a process that allows them to get their supply of stock, as well as keeping the sawmills going with jobs during the hard period- This starts with them buying an area of trees to be sent over to the sawmill, and hiring them to cut them into the required logs. This may be an expensive way about doing this, but buy supplying our own wood to the sawmills we are then able to get a consistent supply of Log Cabins as well as keeping the workers in the sawmills in work during the quiet winter months. Allowing a fairly win-win situation for both parties.

During this talk, they often mentioned about how much stock they had- making me believe that they may be over exaggerating a little… But I was soon proved wrong when we were taken around their warehouses. Their warehouses are spread across the town of Coevorden, with plans for more land into consideration. The warehouses closest to the main office were filled with Log Cabins, and, well I’ll let the images I took speak for themselves.

 

There was hundreds of Log Cabins, all organised in their allocated sections and stacked as high as it was safe to. These pictures show just some of the many Log Cabins within the warehouse, as well as a large section dedicated to our Garden Furniture range – all ready for a quick dispatch to our customers.

There was also a noticeable difference with the Log Cabins this year regarding packaging, a shrink wrap has been implemented in order to protect the cabins in order for them to be stacked as high as they are, as well as reduce the chance of water leakage into the package.

Snow White Playhouse Packaged

The Snow White Playhouse looking protected in the new shrinkwrap packaging.

After looking around in amazement at these two large warehouses, we were then taken to another area of Coevorden where there was two more large warehouses- These ones were filled with our timber supplies:

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If only I could share the smell of all of the fresh timber inside those warehouses, I was also delighted to see the regulation stickers on the timber as shown below. All of our timber comes from sustainable sources, trusted and approved by the regulators such as FSC, PEFC, KOMO and Indonesian Legal Hardwood.

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Though it may appear like a lot of timber just stacked up on top of each other, there is care put into the layout of the warehouses, with fragile items such as glass carefully stored near the corresponding items that they go with (for example, glass table tops).

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After seeing all of this, as well as hearing plans for them to expand even more- I am more convinced that Tuindeco will be able to successfully supply the demand of their hundreds of retailers across Europe, including us.

To finish off the day, I drifted off from the business talk to explore their showsite- Much bigger than ours and stocked with some new products in the 2018 range. Here are just some of my favourite products I took pictures off, you may find more updated across the site to the corresponding product pages.

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At first, I wasn’t too sure when I saw the Wicker Picnic Range in the catalogue- but after seeing them in real life, they were spectacular. They’re comfy and appear to be durable for years of use – as well as being unique in their design, there aren’t many wicker/rattan picnic sets in this style on the market. Made with Aluminum framing to prevent rusting, the rattan braiding was done straight over the framing – Made from a synthetic material in order to make their maintenance pain free.

The Oakland Wicker Lounge Set

The Oakland Eight Piece Wicker Lounge Set has been tested and approved by myself for comfort levels. A great addition to any garden seating area.

Larch DIY Veranda

This Larch DIY Veranda was on our list for quality checking before preparing to list it for the UK market. With a polycarbonate roof available as well as the sliding glass panel – It certainly impressed us and hope to impress our customers too. Keep an eye out for when this will be listed in the near future!

Pardon the rain in the next two photos, but the newly added entrance verandas, found in Shepherd Hut Accessories, also looked very impressive to the eye – A great way to personalise your Shepherd Hut and make a more inviting entrance to your Garden Office or Summerhouse!

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And these are just to list a few of what’s within their showsite – Overall, I can confirm that this was an impressive tip, from looking at the new catalogue products as well as gaining more insight of Tuindeco’s business practices- I hope this was insightful to you as well!

If you’re still curious about Tuin and Tuindeco, you can read more about how we operate from our Tuin About Page as well as the Tuin and Tuindeco in Pictures blog.

Tuin Log Cabin Treatments

In other posts I talk about the importance of a good quality treatment which is correctly applied in regards to Log Cabins and what happens if it is not done well with the best products or not done at all, these posts are here:

In these posts I gave general advice on treatment but did not specifically or simply talk about our own treatments and what we recommend if you choose to use them. I have had a few comments on the posts regarding this so will now answer this in relation to our own Tuin Timber Treatments and how to use them with your log cabin.

Timber Treatment Types

We have six types of treatment for your log cabin:

Factory Treatment Options

Spray Painted – Undercoat only:

This is ordered at the same time as you order your log cabin, it is an undercoat service only and provides two coats of spray paint, it is best to choose a colour that will compliment your final two top coats after installation. Ideally you will use two coats of Embalan Timber Paint for the two top coats.

Using this service will save you time and also give you some confidence it is protected from the elements straightaway. I do though find this quite expensive and do not always recommend this service as it can delay your log cabin delivery for up to 8 weeks.

This is our Flow Log Cabin and pre spray painted in Grey

Immersion Treatment:

The second of the two factory options of treatment, this, like the spray treatment will also need two further coats of additional treatment once it is installed. This treatment is where the entire log cabin and all its parts are put into a vat of rot proof treatment and allowed to soak for hours. This then allows the wood to absorb the rot proof treatment. It is then separated and allowed to dry naturally. Like the spray treatment this will extend your delivery by several weeks.

Personally I do not really like this treatment in anything other than a Log Cabin Gazebo or a Log Cabin style Garage as everything is treated and in brown, green or silver grey it can make the building very dark inside.

Remember that this is only a rot proof treatment, two further coats of treatment will be needed for it to be protected from the weather and to prevent it absorbing water thereby creating water marks and wild expansion and contraction in the log cabin due to the moisture content in the wood.

The perfect treatment on top of this from our ranges is the Carefree Protectant Timber Treatment. Two coats, well applied, are required for full protection.

An immersion treated cabin in green being installed – I like immersion treatment for Gazebos such as this, I’m not so keen on a full building as it makes it very dark inside.

Log Cabin Treatment Options – Self Applied:

Carefree Protectant Treatment:

This is now the very best selling treatment we offer, it is state of the art and is a simply amazing product, please see the Carefree Protect Timber Treatment page for all the details. I thoroughly recommend this and have been using it on everything from a log cabin to hardwood furniture.

Ideally this is used on it’s own (other than the immersion treatment), no base coats of preservative are required or any other product. For full protection for years we recommend three – four, well applied coats.

It is available in a number of colours and all finishes are slightly satin, the clear is VERY clear which people love. It is expensive but I think it is worth the cost. If you love the wood colour and want it to shine the Clear Carefree is Amazing!

I would not recommend using any other product with this or painting anything on top of it other than more of the Carefree treatment when re-application is needed. Saying that, I am told that you can paint on top with anything but i personally cannot recommend it having not done it myself. I also cannot see any point in this as this is a great treatment on its own.

Carefree timber treatment, 3 – 4 coats are required. These logs are an ongoing experiment of mine from January 2016 showing the effect of different layers.

Embadecor Timber Treatment:

Embadecor Timber Stain can be used on its own if you require a stained finish. Like Carefree no other treatment or preservative is required. Again like all good treatment you will need to apply three – four coats if you are using it on it’s own. Lots of colours of stains are available, please see more details on the Embadecor Timber Stain page. Embadecor treatment should be used as an undercoat for the Embalan Timber Paint.

If you like the stained look whereby there is a colour but with the grain of the wood coming through then I recommend this stain highly (still not as highly as the carefree though)

Embadecor timber stain, 3 – 4 coats are required. These logs are an ongoing experiment of mine from January 2016 showing the effect of different layers of the stain.

Embalan Timber Paint:

This is a very high quality paint in solid colours, it gives great coverage and is available in several colours. This is on par with what I consider to be the best UK paint – Sikkens. To use this successfully it is recommended at least one – two coats of Embadecor timber stain (clear) as the undercoat. Further details of this paint can be found on the Embalan Timber Paint page.

Embalan timber paint, 3 – 4 coats are required if used on its own. These logs are an ongoing experiment of mine from January 2016 showing the effect of different layers of the paint. If you use an undercoat of 2 coats of clear Embadecor stain then two top coats are required of the Embalan paint.

Impregnation Fluid:

If you have a hot tub, a jacuzzi, a freezer or fridge in your log cabin or even if it is being shut up for a long time then it is a good idea to protect the inside of the cabin. The impregnation fluid is excellent for doing this, it is clear and goes on like water and will inhibit the formation of damp spores and guard against fungi / mosses forming. You can paint / stain over this as required. This is only a rot proof treatment and does not guard against the weather. This is also an excellent treatment for timber that is already suffering from not receiving any treatment at all to kill any bugs that may be present before applying a proper treatment outside.

Carefree Timber Cleaner:

I will come back to this as I’m still experimenting with the product. Suffice to say this is a 17 years old building that has NEVER received any treatment at all as an experiment. Now I am looking at how to clean and refurbish it. This was using the new product and took literally a few minutes to achieve. Guess which bit we treated with the timber cleaner?

Picture taken of a 17 years old log cabin which has never ever received any treatment or love in its life. A liberal spray of Carefree Timber Cleaner is doing just that.

A quick test ….. more to come in a blog post and product launch.

Log Cabin Treatment Summary

I’ll give a quick run through of my recommendations and combinations of treatments using Tuindeco range to sum up.

  • Spray undercoat – TWO further coats of treatment will be required using Embalan timber Paint.
  • Immersion Treatment – TWO further coats of treatment will be required, these can either be Embadecor Stain or Carefree Protect. I would not recommend the Embalan paint without applying two undercoats of the stain first.
  • Carefree – Only use this on it’s own, nothing else is required, 3 – 4 coats is perfect for 100% protection. No undercoats or topcoats are needed. Just use Carefree and nothing else.
  • Embadecor Stain – 3 – 4 coats gives 100% protection, nothing else is needed. lightly sand between coats.
  • Embalan Paint – 3 – 4 coats is good and can be done so without an undercoat if you wish. BUT, for best results use at least one coat of clear Embadecor stain as an undercoat. For the perfect solution use two coats of clear stain followed by two coats of paint.
  • Impregnation Fluid – Ideally use inside when damp conditions persist – one – two coats.

For my other posts on the treatment of your log cabin timber please see the posts below:

Timber Treatment of Larch / Douglas or Oak timber

This is just a teaser, have a look at this treatment we will shortly be launching:

This is a timber treatment primarily designed for larch and oak or douglas fir. It cleans prior to a proper treatment using something like our Carefree Protect Timber Treatment …. it looks damn impressive!!

I’m wondering if this will work on cleaning up a log cabin if it hasn’t been treated properly or for a long time when a cheap treatment has failed …. interesting …  I will come back with findings soon.

European Larch Timber

I love Larch, it has such a wonderful colour and feel to it, a really lovely hue of pinks, oranges and yellows. We’ve recently built a raised decking area on our show site incorporating Larch decking, steps and balustrade, we built it around one of the very popular Tourist Gazebos and it really has worked very well.

Tuin UK Show site

Larch decking and balustrade incorporated into one of our standard treated pine gazebos.

It looks gorgeous!  Larch does not need treating but I love the colour of it and to ensure we can see it for a very long time we’ve treated it with Clear Carefree Protectant.

Of course, being made from Larch you do not have to treat it, it is a very oily, resinous and dense wood that does not need any maintenance. It will weather eventually to a silvery grey and this process depends on its location, weather conditions and positioning. Of course if you would like to keep the gorgeous colour then it can be treated with a clear timber treatment as we have done.

On a recent to visit Tuindeco we went through the latest products for the coming season and I was really pleased to see as well as the stunning Larch Modular Garden Building Range they are also introducing a Gazebo range, all made from Larch. I have already ordered one and we’ll be putting it up on show soon, I’m sure sales of these will far exceed the pine ones, not only for its beauty but also its extensive longevity, strength and ease of care.

Larch is such a wonderful timber, it’s been used in construction for years and is also used with boat building, in Central Europe it has been long regarded as one of the best building timbers. It’s stronger than pine and is very popular with architects for external cladding and outdoor structures. Un-dried larch is particularly good for heavy structural work.

Larch is unusual amongst the softwoods as it is deciduous and sheds its pine needles in the Autumn. It also features in Lapp and Siberian folklore as the ‘World Tree’. The smoke from burning the timber is said to ward off evil spirits and is used as protection by their Shamans as well to induce visions (not recommended).

Properties of European Larch

Strength and its ability to withstand constantly changing wet and dry environments is its main desirable property, couple this with its natural rot resistant properties, wonderful colour and fine texture which make it lovely to work with and enjoy in your garden.

  • Larch is a deciduous, softwood, conifer tree, highly resinous, and a medium density wood (530 kg/m3)
  • Tuindeco Larch is sourced from Western Europe – PEFC or FSC. Environmentally sound and sustainable.
  • Being a  very dense wood it can resist constant changes from wet to dry with very little distortion, warping and shrinkage once dry. It can be prone to surface splits but this does not affect the strength, longevity or durability.
  • A strong timber and stronger than other conifers such as Spruce and Pine. It is 60% stiffer than European redwoods, 30% stronger in bending and compression, 40% harder. It does though have similar crushing and impact properties to that of pine and spruce.
  • Larch is faintly scented and has a wonderful straight grain with small knots. It is reddish, orangy, pinky in colour with contrasting white sap rings. It has fine texture and a high definition of grain.
  • Low maintenance and does not need treating, when allowed to weather if becomes a silvery grey colour. It is a good idea though to treat it where it is directly in contact with the ground.
  • Larch is in the durability class of 3 – 4. Durability is the measurement of a 50mm x 50mm cross section of timber left in the ground unprotected. Class 3 is 10 – 15 years. Class 4 is 5 – 10 years. When untreated and NOT in ground contact you can expect a life of 50 – 60 years. When treated and outdoors the life expectancy is 100 years.

Larch Limitations:

Like everything there are some limitations and foibles that it’s worth bearing in mind when you are working with Larch.

  • Due to its dense nature larch can split easily if you nail it without some preparation. Always drill a pilot hole before nailing or screwing to stop any splits being created.
  • Larch can leach slightly when new and can stain concrete surfaces. This is due to the high tannin content. It is a good idea to treat the timber when in contact with the ground
  • The Tannins can also react with iron and will produce and blue / black colour stain. Ideally always use non-ferrous nails and screws to guard against this.

Identification of the Larch Tree

A couple of useful videos to aid in the identification of a larch tree should you wish, the first one I found particularly useful!

For more information on Larch the Forestry Commision produce a nice leaflet on Larch for their visitors

Tuindeco Larch Timber Products

The ranges of timber are constantly expanding, numerous lengths, profile, and pieces are available for your own Larch construction project

Larch

Larch timber is available to complete any garden construction project in a huge variety of thickness, profiles and lengths.

Also available is an extensive range of Larch modular buildings in both flat roof and apex roofs.

Apex larch gaben building

Modular Larch Garden Buildings in three main styles and a myriad of possibilities, sizes and styles.

New for this season are Larch Gazebos: I can see these really taking off as these will make a stunning addition to any garden.

Larch timber gazebos

Larch timber gazebos

Tanalised / Pressure Treated Garden Timber

Earlier this week we received a review on one of our products, part of it was:

“The first thing I noticed was how badly it had been pressure treated with green splatters on a number of pieces”

I personally really hate a bad review, this was one but unfounded, we try our hardest to provide a top quality product with a top class service and will review everything that is said to improve where we can.Sometimes though it just comes down to understanding a product that you are buying and the expectations that match it.

This review has prompted me to write this quick post as from this statement it is clear that customers are not realising what tanalised timber actually is: I shall explain a little about it so people can gain more understanding of what you are buying and that there are no faults at all nor “badly” carried out.

Tanalisation / Pressure treatment are one of the same, it is the identical process and is carried out normally on pine timber for outside use as a rot protection:

Terms

The two terms used are describing exactly the same timber treatment:

  • Tanalised is actually a trademark, as is ‘Tanalith E’ which you will see sometimes.  This brand has been around since the 1940’s.
  • Pressure treatment is the process carried out using ‘Tanalith E’ or similar.

Process

The treatment process is carried out by placing the timber in a big tank.  The door is shut and a vacuum is created inside it.  Then the pressure treatment fluid is allowed to enter and is forced in the wood under the pressure.  It penetrates to a depth of a few millimeters.

Pressure Treatment process using 'tanalith' or similar

Ingredients

The main ingredient is copper with other chemicals added.  Copper is excellent for protection against rot and insects.  The other chemicals (Biocides) protect against other rot that the copper can’t such as ‘brown rot fungi’.  These substances are not harmful at all and can be used around animals and children.  Fish may be sensitive to it.

Rot Proofing of Timber 

It does exactly what it says and protects the timber from rot really well, internally they say about 60 years and externally about 30 years against any form of rot.  It’s pretty good stuff!

Promotional video explaining the Tanalisation process / Pressure Treatment

Please note after watching the process, it is in a huge tank under a vacuum, it cannot be at fault or ‘Badly’ done.

Limitations of tanalisation / Pressure Treatment

So now we understand how the process works, as the video explains, the timber will be:

  • An initial light green colour.
  • Weathers to a light honey brown.
  • Eventually to a natural silver grey.

This change of colour is not any indication of loss of preservative protection. Subsequent decorative finishes can be added to create the look you desire, you will see many examples of this across our website and catalogue.

We supply fixings that will have a comparable life to the timber for many of our products but please note if timber is cut, notched, sawn etc then a comparable treatment will need to be applied to carry on protecting the timber.

Perceived Faults in Pressure Treated / Tanalised Timber

Occasionally, a customer will perceive faults in the process without a full understand of it such as the above review. Some of these perceived faults are:

Formation of salts: 

With impregnated wood it may seem as if salts are formed on the surface of wood. It is actually resin that colours yellow/green due to the impregnation. These stains will vanish in time. This is an example and shows the ‘Splatters’ complained about in the review:

One of our fence panels displaying the formation of salts and "Splatters"

One of our fence panels displaying the formation of salts and “Splatters”

You can see from this picture green portions on the fence panel. This cannot be helped and is part of the pressure treatment process. You may see this on your new pergola, planter or gazebo, please expect this, it is completely normal.

Fungi and blue moulds:
Wood impregnated by boiler pressure induction will become very humid while being processed. As a result, the wood can be affected by mildew and fungi, especially during the warm seasons. These visual imperfections of the product will vanish or can otherwise easily be removed by hand.  Fungi do not affect the quality or strength of the wood.  Since wood can swell and shrink as a natural product, the dimensions listed in the catalogue and product pages can show small deviations.
This is an example from one of our show buildings. You can also see a small split in the timber which is also completely normal (more information: Splits in Timber is normal)
Blue mold and the formation of salt crystals.

Blue mold and the formation of salt crystals.

 All of these blooms, stains, salts etc can either be washed off or left, they will eventually go and is a standard feature of any timber that has been pressure treated. Our customer with the bad review went on to say:
“The pergola is up now and after fixing it and rubbing down the green splashes”
This was extremely worrying and I have advised him since, but, please do not “rub down” the ‘Splashes’! Doing so will remove the protection. Removal of resin bubbles is fine with a sharp knife but do not rub down the surface.
As we have learnt these are not a splash, these are the inherent properties of timber and the tanalisation process and are the cause of the copper ingredient reacting with the moisture and sap within the timber itself.
Here’s another example of a perceived fault:
Light bleaching after the tanalisation process.

Light bleaching after the tanalisation process.

I have added green lines on his product to highlight it more for you. You will notice there are some lighter lines. These lines will have been caused after the pressure treatment process and during storage. Light affects timber, it cannot be helped.
During storage certain parts may be covered due to packaging, positioning etc. Other parts are exposed to light. Light will start to react with the timber turning it first to brown and then to a silvery colour. Again this cannot be helped and should be expected.
After a few weeks all of the new structure will reach the same colour due to light exposure.
Of course you can add your own preferred colour to any tanalised timber. Tanalisation / Pressure treatment is of course only a rot proofing treatment is is NOT a decorative or weatherproof finish. Further treatment is highly recommended to stop cracks and splits, prevent warping and to maintain its good looks

Log Cuts in Log Cabins

This short article is the second in my timber series which tries to explain the types of timber we can use in log cabins. In this post I will try to explain how we can muck about with the timber to give you a really good price, but is it really good quality? Do you really want it?

The first in the series is here: Types of Timber in your Log Cabin

Timber Mills

I’ve already spoken about Spruce and Pine and their differences, now we can look at the actual log.

Logs arriving at the mill

Logs arriving at the mill

When the felled logs arrive at the mill an assessment is carried out on the best way to cut them for what ever uses have been specified. There are numerous different cuts for various reasons. It not simply a case of slicing them up. Wood is very expensive and the various parts of a log are worth varying amounts of money.

Parts of a Log

So lets look at this log:

Parts of a tree trunk

Parts of a tree trunk

There’s a few parts to it, each has it’s own properties and of course monetary value. It makes sense that the most valued part of the tree is the heartwood, this is the strongest part. It’s far more dense, it has less knots in it and is where all the full ‘goodness’ of the wood is.

This is the bit we like and are most interested in. This is the part that we make all of the posts from in the gazebos so we can be sure of the full strength, of course it does cause a few problems sometimes. Please see this post about the inherent problems of using this heartwood that sometimes a customer may see as a defect: Crack and splits in timber. However if we didn’t use it, and we used a different section and make a higher profit, your gazebo would not be half as strong. We’d be laughing to the bank but would you want that?

The heartwood is also the part Tuindeco will use for the log cabins but more on that a little later, lets keep looking at the log.

Best Bit of the Log

Lets look at our log again, we now know that the best and most expensive part is going to be the heartwood.  So as a mill we might look at this log and think to ourselves how we can cut it to provide the strongest piece and of course make the most money giving the highest grade of timber. Perhaps we’ll cut this from it:

Best and strongest part of a tree trunk for logs

Best and strongest part of a tree trunk for logs

With this we can take the most expensive piece and sell it at a premium and meet the Swedish Timber Grade of I – IV. We still have the rest of the log to play with and we can cut it up for all sorts of different uses meeting lower Swedish timber grades, maybe we could cut it like this:

Cuts you could possibly apply to a log

Cuts you could possibly apply to a log

There’s lots of technical terms we can use, Flitches, Deck, Board Scantlings etc. I’ll not bore you even more than maybe I am now.

Basically it means we’re cutting up the log to make the very best use of it. We’re cutting it to grades and to what we can get for it according to the buyers requirements and maybe their budget.

I found these images very interesting on the various cuts that can be found within a tree for various purposes:

Various types of cuts available from a log

Various types of cuts available from a log

As you can see there are lots of different ways to cut it, it gets even more technical and in another post I can blabber away about how we cut it to ensure knots do not fall out (Re-Sawn). Or how we ensure the very heart is cut to remain totally straight throughout the length of the final log cabin log.

Log Cabin Differences

I’ve seen another supplier of log cabins talk about differences in various log cabins. They are however completely missing the point. Double glazing and locks, roofing materials and sizes really are not the point when it comes to the buildings.

The ONLY thing that matters is the type of timber used, the quality of it, where it is from and where it is cut from within a log. And of course the moisture content (another post will deal with this) Moisture content makes a HUGE difference to the timber used in a log cabin.

Windows and doors, fancy locks, glazing, roofing etc is very superfluous and will not have any bearing on the quality or longevity. The timber is the important part and in my opinion the only part to worry about when you are researching or buying a log cabin.

The Log Cabin Cut

OK, lets assume you’re out to buy a log cabin, you’ve got cash to spend and maybe you can go direct to the timber mills and maybe even you can go direct to the factory. First I suspect you want the best timber, we’ve already talked about timber before: Types of Timber in a log cabin. and maybe you can get to the forest to select the best trees in the right location. You may have already known about how to get cheap log cabins.

BUT now you can make it even cheaper and really get the price to where you want it. Maybe you are a UK supplier out to blast the market with you super duper best price log cabin

So why not use these cuts from a log and ask them to make the logs from them? This would be super cheap, probably about 20 – 40% cheaper :

Logs you could take from a tree trunk

Logs you could take from a tree trunk

Blimey, you’d make a killing! Your Log cabin would be way cheaper than anyone else, You’d sell LOADS

This is exactly what some suppliers will do, the outside of a tree is about 20% less weight than the inside, it makes for a cheaper building and certainly looks right on paper. You can even quote a Swedish log quality (above V but would you know the difference?). Kiln dried, really super duper! All the customers would think they have the UK’s best deal! WOOHOO!

By the way, I heard a quote recently from a very good friend in the industry. He said: “I can make a log cabin to any price you want. You want cheap? You will sell hundreds in the first few weeks but never answer the phone again!”

We would like to answer the phone this year and next and the year after……

But really what do you want? If you were at the mill and knew all of the above what would you really want?  Maybe this cut or are you not that bothered?

Inside cuts for a log cabin

Inside cuts for a log cabin

Tuindeco International BV produce cabins from the heart, literally and in both senses of the word. I once wrote a post ages ago about questions to ask a log cabin supplierr. Please now also add this question: “Where is the cut of your logs from?”

Timber Series

Following on from this I intend to write a short series on timber in log cabins, you really wouldn’t believe the differences and the ways we can play with wood to get to the prices you the consumer wants but, do you really want it in the long term?

The first in the series is here: Types of Timber in your Log Cabin

The following will be added to this blog over time:

  1. How we can cut a timber log to make a cheap log cabin.
  2. Moisture content in timber, machining and the impact of the content.
  3. Timber calculation to cut costs you can work out yourself and see where you maybe opting for a bargain while adding to a companies profits.
  4. More expansion information for log cabins.
  5. The pitfalls of thinner logs, barge-boards, windows and doors.
  6. Drying processes – kiln dried versus natural drying.