Adding a Window

Another Window?

Imagine you’ve built your log cabin and you find you need more light, or perhaps you already know you will need another window.

An additional large window has been added to the rear of this standard Rick 40mm Log cabin.

Or maybe you cannot block out that amazing scenery you have from your garden.

an extra window has been added to the rear wall of this Jutka, Gazebo, log cabin combination building.

If you do decide you would like another window Tuin do offer these, they’re a generic window of various sizes and can be fitted to any manufactures log cabin of thicknesses from 28mm up to 70mm:

When to Install an extra window

If you’ve already decided you would like an addtional window to that which comes as standard with your building you will probably order it at the same time as your building. You’ve then got to decide whether you are going to install it at the same time or afterwards, neither really matters, but my  preference is to always install it following the whole install. I like this way because:

  • You can be sure the main building has gone together correctly.
  • You will not void any guarantee.
  • You can be 100% certain of the positioning.
  • You avoid making mistakes in cutting logs.
  • You can be sure you are not going to structurally effect the log cabin.

Of course you can install it as you go but you run higher risks of a mess up, of which I have done in my early days fitting log cabins – namely cutting the logs wrong which does end in tears when there is no spare logs.

Generic Window Parts

There are several ways windows are made for log cabins and invariably they all follow the same pattern; they are a window frame with fascias applied to create a U section that the wall logs will sit in.

Remember it is important that the windows or doors are NOT fixed to the logs in any way to allow for expansion and contraction.

Below is an old Generic window I found in the workshop which I’ll use as a demonstration on how I fit the window.

Various parts that make up the generic window.

These windows are made up three components:

  • Window Frame.
  • Spacer Pieces according the width of wall log.
  • Window facias.

If we look at the spacers / battens you will see there is a paper label showing you the measurements for various log thicknesses.

Spacers which are marked and will be cut down to match the log thickness you have in your building.

Of course if the paper is not there, lost or got wet or even if your log thickness is not shown then you can easily measure this. If you are cutting to your own size it is best to make is 2 – 3mm larger. For instance; a 40mm thick wall log would have a spacer measurement of 42 – 43mm in width.

It might help to layout the parts so you can see exactly what you have.

Parts of the window. You should have two top, four side and two bottom fascias. As well as the spacers or adjustable battens whichever term you prefer.

Fitting the Generic Window

Before you start, trim down the spacers to match the thickness of your log cabin either by using the mark guide or measuring yourself. We are going to fit this window into a 58mm log cabin at our show site.

58mm thick wall log.

Start by marking the spacer for your size of wall log

Cut the spacer down using a handsaw or if you have it use a circular saw or jigsaw.

Once you have your spacers to size you can then fix them to the window frame.

Spacers have been fitted on each of the wides of the window frame.

You will of course need four spacers that go on each side of the window frame. You can fix these however you would like to, some fitters will use nails but personally I like to use screws as I think it gives a better fit, it’s easier to take apart and is generally stronger. The choice of fixing is yours at this point.

I prefer to use screws to fit the spacers but it is up to you at this point.

Cutting a hole in your Log Cabin

This next bit can be a bit tense and I must admit it still makes me a bit nervous in case I mess it up.

Before we start measuring or cutting holes we need to find the best place for our window. There’s a couple of rules to follow:

  • Do not cut any closer than 200mm to the interlocking corner of the cabin.
  • Do not cut any closer than 200mm to the side of another window.
  • Ideally start or finish your cut on a full log.
  • Ideally leave at least two clear logs above the window to maintane integrity of the building.
  • Make your own judgement of the integrity of the building once the hole is cut, if you need advice for a tricky placement please contact the main office or leave a message on this page and we’ll be pleased to help.

You can measure the window and transcribe those measurement onto the walls which is what I think a lot of people do. You would start at the centre point and measure out either side both top and bottom and then mark the lines.

Personally I still don’t trust myself or a tape measure and hold the actual window frame (including attached spacers) to the wall and mark around it with a pencil / pen. That way I can be sure my eyes haven’t gone wonky or the tape measure has stretched or shrunk.

Either mark out where you are going to cut the window by taking measurements from the window frame or hold the actual window to the wall and draw around it.

One marked you need to consider what happens when your log cabin either expands or contract which it will do over the cycle of the seasons. For more details on this please see: Expansion and Contraction in Log Cabins.

As you will know it is necessary to leave an expansion, or, contraction gap above the window to cope with seasonal variations. The gap you make will be decided by the time of year you are installing:

  • Height of Summer: The wood will be at its smallest as a lot of moisture will have escaped. Therefore only a small gap of 10 – 15mm maybe necessary as the building is only likely to expand more as Autumn and Winter arrive.
  • Depths of Winter: The wood will be at its largest size as it will have absorbed a lot of moisture from the surrounding air. Therefore a gap of 20 – 30mm maybe necessary as the building is only likely to contract as the Spring and Summer arrive.

As the logs expand marginally length ways you only really need a gap of around 5 – 10mm either side, again depending on the time of year you are installing.

I prefer to be on the right side of caution and will perhaps make the expansion gap slightly smaller. I will then advise the customer to check behind the fascias as the season changes over the first year to make sure a gap is still present of at least 5mm in the depth of winter. If it is not it is easy to remove the window and take out a little more to allow for the gap.

Making our marks to allow for expansion and contraction of the logs around the window frame.

Once you made your marks, double and triple checked then we can cut the wall logs. A circular saw make sit easy work but you can of course use a hand saw.

Cutting the hole is easier with a circular saw but you can also use a jigsaw or a hand saw.

A complete window hole cut. Do not worry if you are not 100% straight in your cut as any slight deviations will be hidden behind the fascia.

You can offer up the window to check for fitment.

Final Fitting of the Generic Window

You can now fit the fascias on the outside of the window, again, like the spacers you can either screw or nail them onto the frame. I personally think screws are far better but it is up to you.

Fit the fascia to the outside of the window frame onto the spacers.

When you are working with wood it is always highly advisable to pilot hole anything you are going to be screwing or nailing.

Always use a pilot hole when screwing or nailing one piece of wood to another.

Once all four of the outside fascia has been fitted you can then place the window into the hole. In the next picture we have done this from the outside. Notice one single screw used in the centre of the top fascia, this is to loosely secure the window so it can be completed from the inside single handedly. It is of course better if you have someone holding it for you.

Note the screw will be removed once the window is installed.

Complete window fitted from the outside of the log cabin, loosely held in place by one screw at the top to make it easier to fit. The screw is of course later removed.

The fascias are fitted to the inside and the ‘helping screw’ outside is removed and the window is complete.

There we have the completed window!

A Few Window Notes:

Fitting a window is not too hard at all, just consider you expansion and contraction gaps, also the old saying of ‘measure twice cut once’ is very relevant.

Over the first year as the seasons change, periodically check your gap above the window, you can easily remove the top fascia to check behind it.

If security is a concern you can:

  • Countersink your screws and use wood filler mixed with sawdust to hide your screws on the outside fascia.
  • You can use Philips head screws and once installed drill the head so it can no longer be used.
  • Use security screws.

Ben Clockhouse Log Cabin Feature

On the Ben Clockhouse Log Cabin product page, we like to give you the nitty gritties of the product in terms of dimensions, technical installation tips and the best feature of said product.

But, on this page we let our previous customers voice their opinion on the Ben Clockhouse Log Cabin and let them show you their thoughts, ideas and pictures! We may also have our team input why they desire that particular product too, so here goes.

Ben Clockhouse Log Cabin

Ben clockhouse 70mm log cabin with canopy

The Ben Clockhouse Log Cabin is certainly not one to mess with.. Manufactured using 70mm interlocking logs, the Clockhouse Log Cabin combines a classic English feel with a touch of Scandinavia. It measures 5.5x4m and has a side covered porch measuring 3.8m overall the building is 9.30 x 4.0m. With six double glazed windows and two sets of double doors (also double glazed) you will receive plenty of natural light in your spacious Cabin.

Reviews:

With all of these features, you can really see why we love the Ben Clockhouse and our customers agree too- with an average customer rating of five stars. Here are a few excerpts from some of the Ben Clockhouse Log Cabin Reviews:

“We are so happy with our summer house . The quality is amazing And the service we received from Tuin was very good It was delivered on time and we use one of their contractors to construct it Which they’ve done with minimal effort We will be so looking forward to using this in the summer or possibly even in the winter as he is so sturdy .” -Mr. Whisson 

“The quality of this log cabin is superb and I cannot rate it highly enough. I built it myself without any problems (I am not a joiner) and it was a dream to go together” – Mr. S McBain

“As for value for money this is as good a feature as the quality of the product. Finished, a cabin of this quality would likely cost in excess of £25,000 to complete (in my view) and I doubt that even the best carpenters around could produce a finish as good as this.” – Promuso

Installation:

The installation for the Ben Clockhouse Log Cabin is a simple process, so long as you keep organised. You can find loads of information in order to be fully prepared for installing your Log Cabin on the Essential Installation Manual as well as plenty of other Log Cabin Fitting Tips throughout the blog, from our expert (practically), Richard.

Here are one of our favourite installation sets of images:

 

Installed:

And when installed and treated/painted… Its just a showstopper… Here are just a few of our favourite customer installs:

 

Videos:

We have also received a few videos, so you can experience the Ben Clockhouse Log Cabin from all angles, simply click on one below to start watching:

Customer Pictures:

If you would like to see more photo’s from customers please click on the picture below – Note: This will take you to our customers photo gallery hosted by Google Photos. Pictures may show older models or customer own modifications.

Ben clockhouse Log Cabin customer gallery

With the (almost) unbeatable 70mm thick logs, the amount of windows and natural light- the Ben Clockhouse Log Cabin is ideal for many uses like an additional living space/office and with the benefit of a covered area for outdoor dining. The cabin would be an amazing addition for use as a poolhouse.

Ben Clockhouse Log Cabin

Ben clockhouse 70mm log cabin with canopy

For more details such as measurements and the breakdown of what comes within the self build kit, please look at the Ben Clockhouse Log Cabin product page.

If you’re not looking for a cabin with logs as thick as this, try looking at the Stian Log Cabin Feature page or even the Blackpool Log Cabin Feature page.

The Forgotten Log Cabin Accessory

I’m always being asked what’s the most needed accessory for a log cabin and I tell customers the usual:

  • Treatment – This can’t be overlooked, without this you won’t have a cabin worth keeping in a few years and you may also experience a few problems with it if overlooked – Log Cabin Treatment
  • Shingles – Without these it just looks really rubbish, felt shingles really does set a log cabin off – Free Offer Shingles
  • Roof shingle glue – This I always recommend for the ridge and especially if you are in an exposed area. My most favourite review on the site said about the glue: ‘The stickiest thing since Sticky the stick insect got stuck on a sticky bun!’ and yes it really is very sticky – Felt shingles Glue

After these three it then gets very building and need specific, you may want a floor, some supports for the canopy posts, maybe an extra window or doors, perhaps you want to add an internal wall, pressure treatment, maybe you want a posh finial etc.

All of our accessories can be found here: Log Cabin Accessories some of the major ones may already be on the drop down list of  the log cabin you are looking at.

I always forget about our annexes though so I’m writing this to show you but also to remind myself we have them, they’re at the top of the pages and I think as customers and myself whiz down the pages for a log cabin they’re looking for we both miss these handy accessories.

Log Cabin with a Storage Shed:

Some of our best selling log cabins have a shed adjoining them, buildings like the Agnes corner log cabin:

Agnes corner log cabin with a storage shed to the side in 45mm wall logs

Agnes corner log cabin with a storage shed to the side in 45mm wall logs

We have several of these buildings, they’re very popular and very handy indeed, here’s another one – The Lukas:

The Lukas log cabin with a shed integrated into it. Extremely handy

The Lukas log cabin with a shed integrated into it. Extremely handy and many customers love it’s practical nature of design.

My other personal favourite is the Wolfgang log cabin, this has been a long standing best seller:

The 45mm Wolfgang log cabin with a shed to the side and a delightful front porch.

The 45mm Wolfgang log cabin with a shed to the side and a delightful front porch.

So bearing in mind we have lots of best sellers with a shed to the side we really should cater more for this shouldn’t we?

Maybe more buildings featuring them? Except – I forget we do!

Log Cabin Annexe – Shed Extension

This is the accessory, the must have one I sometimes forget about and I know customers overlook as they whiz through our pages. It’s a very handy little annexe you can bolt onto your log cabin, even if you didn’t buy your log cabin from us:

A shed extension you can add to any log cabin, we have them in 28mm or 45mm thick wall logs.

A shed extension you can add to any log cabin, we have them in 28mm or 45mm thick wall logs.

We have these annexes, or shed extensions for your log cabins in two sizes with either a 28mm thick wall log or a 45mm one:

Versatile Extension for your Log Cabin

The lovely part of this accessory for your log cabin is that is can turn it into a completely different building, it becomes very practical and you have the best of both worlds, a shed and a summerhouse. Here’s some nice examples of the shed extension in use:

This is a 28mm extension being used with the Henning log cabin. This customer actually used it as a toilet.

This is a 28mm extension being used with the Henning log cabin. This customer actually used it as a toilet.

Here's another view, yup he has his toilet in there. He used to be in the house all the time but since having his cabin his wife tends to lose him most days!

Here’s another view, yup he has his toilet in there. He used to be in the house all the time but since having his cabin his wife tends to lose him most days!

This is a nice use of the log cabin shed extension, this customer has put it on the back of our Asmund Corner Log Cabin and turned a simple building into something a little more special:

The Asmund corner log cabin with a shed extension log cabin accessory to the rear of the build.

The Asmund corner log cabin with a shed extension log cabin accessory to the rear of the build.

I think this one is really nice, it’s totally changed the look of a standard log cabin. This cabin is the Johan, here’s a picture in it’s standard build:

Johan log cabin in it's standard build in 34mm logs, a lovely building as it is and very practical.

Johan log cabin in it’s standard build in 34mm logs, a lovely building as it is and very practical.

I like it as it is but when we add one of the annexes it transform it into something else with more potential and more uses:

Johan log cabin with a shed extension added to the front. This extension can be placed on most walls as required at installation.

Johan log cabin with a shed extension added to the front. This extension can be placed on most walls as required at installation.

Log cabin shed extension, you can have this in two sizes in either 28mm or 45mm thick wall logs and two sizes.

Log cabin shed extension, you can have this in two sizes in either 28mm or 45mm thick wall logs and two sizes.

The log cabin shed extension annexes are a nice addition, you may like to consider one with your cabin or maybe you already have a log cabin and fancy adding a storage shed to it. This annexe is a simple solution and worth considering as perhaps one of the most important log cabin accessories.

Log Cabin in the Woods

Mr Teague settled for the Edelweiss Log Cabin, a substantial 70mm log cabin but like a lot of our customers the base was a problem and was resolved using timber frames.

One of my most favourite bases for log cabins is the timber frame and stilt method (as I call it) using this means you can easily level an area without all the expense of concrete, brick work, slabs etc. It is also a LOT cheaper, less hassle and of course extremely environmentally friendly as the ground doesn’t have to be disturbed and natural drainage is still allowed to continue. Drainage for concrete bases is often overlooked.

Determining the drop

Determining the drop Log Cabins must be level!

For Mr Teague the drop isn’t massive although with this base system very large gradients can be accommodated. As I’ve said in previous posts it it vital that a log cabin is 100% level for it to be viable in the long term.

Timber frames are made first for the log cabin base

Timber frames are made first for the log cabin base

Numerous sections of frames can be built before hand for the log cabin timber base

Numerous sections of frames can be built before hand for the log cabin timber base

Depending on the size of the building it is often easier to make the timber frames separately and then bolt them together. The size of the building will often determine the thickness of the timber used although generally the thicker the better.

Frames are supported on concrete slabs and substantial stilts

Frames are supported on concrete slabs and substantial stilts

The basic frames are then joined together and supported on stilts, in-turn supported by slabs. There are lots of gimmicks on the market to help you to do this but I still say you can’t beat a big lump of wood for the job, it’s also a lot cheaper than the various pads you can buy as is a slab, my recommendations are to always stick with the basic materials to save on the costs, you don’t need anything fancy to create a good timber frame base for your log cabin.

Building the Edelweiss log cabin on the stilt timber base

Building the Edelweiss log cabin on the stilt timber base

With the frames in place and 100% level the build can commence, generally this base will have been made in a fraction of the time it would with concrete or slabs and of course Mr Teague didn’t have the hassle and damage that bringing concrete to site can cause to the environment and the wallet.

Further progress with the Edelweiss Log Cabin build

Further progress with the Edelweiss Log Cabin build

Roof being fitted and the whole build nearly complete of the log cabin

Roof being fitted and the whole log cabin build is nearly complete

The log cabin build is completed and now the hard work starts for Mr Teague

The log cabin build is completed and now the hard work starts for Mr Teague

With the build complete our recommended fitters (with a little help from me in the background) have finished the build as far as they can. For Mr Teague, his cabin completed without mess, too much money spent and time. But of course the hard work start now for him in finishing the project.

Mr Teague was kind enough to write the following review:

When I started looking at Lob Cabins my first instinct was to look at all the Internet web sites and try to find an obvious “Best Deal”. Very quickly it became clear that this was a competitive area and loads of companies were offering what seemed similar cabins at temptingly cheap prices.

The site that brought it all together for me was Tuins excellent Blog where Richard explains in simple terms the ins/outs of log cabins and the differences between them. This was a huge eye opener and gave me the info I needed to pick what was right for me ie a solid well made cabin at a price I could justify. I chose the Edelweiss.
That for me was the difficult bit over – finding a supplier I could trust. Everything else just flowed smoothly, good communication, advice on foundations and quick delivery. Tuin even found me someone to install the cabin after gently explaining that it might be a it bit much to install such a big cabin on my own!
A month or so the cabin looks superb with it’s decking (I built) and sits beautifully in the garden surrounded by spring flowers.
I can wholeheartedly recommend Tuin as an excellent company to do business with. Other companies may supply products that look cheaper but from my research they are not a patch on Tuins range.
I have now just ordered a second (much smaller) cabin from them which I will install myself. Watch this space!

After the build and the fitters have gone it’s always lovely for me to know what happens next and Mr Teague was kind enough to let me know how the log cabin then progressed and sent me these pictures of the various stages up to the completed project.

The Log cabin stilt base is being extended for a decking area around the cabin

The Log cabin stilt base is being extended for a decking area around the cabin still using the original concept of a timber frame stilt base.

Floor joists are added using joist hangers.

Floor joists and noggins are added using joist hangers.

Decking boards being laid outside the Edelweiss log cabin

Decking boards being laid outside the Edelweiss log cabin

The Edelweiss log cabin and decking area now complete, finishing touches are all that is left to do

The Edelweiss log cabin and decking area now complete, finishing touches are all that is left to do

The end results of this project are stunning as Mr Teagues pictures below will show. I’m not sure how much the complete project cost but I know it was certainly very economical and using a base such as this will keep the costs very low when compared to the alternatives.

Here are pictures of the completed project, Stunning!

Cabin in the woods!

Cabin in the woods!

An amazing location for our Edelweiss log cabin

An amazing location for our Edelweiss log cabin

Decking area in front of the log cabin

Decking area in front of the log cabin

Could there be a better location for this log cabin

Could there be a better location for this log cabin

Looking inside Mr Teagues log cabin

Looking inside Mr Teagues log cabin

Another view inside. I'm not sure what the overall use of the log cabin is but at 70mm, insulated an double glazed you could live in this all year round.

Another view inside. I’m not sure what the overall use of the log cabin is but at 70mm, insulated an double glazed you could live in this all year round.

My warmest thanks to Mr Teague for these pictures and for keeping in touch with us after the project. Personally it makes my day seeing these pictures and knowing the full story, it also helps me to advise better and foresee any problem for future customers.

As with any customers who send us these sort of stories / pictures we always send thank you presents or offer VERY good prices on next purchases. Mr Teague has now ordered the Halvar log cabin from us for use as a very nice storage shed.

If you would like further information on log cabin bases please see a previous post I wrote a while ago: Base Requirements For Log Cabins

If you would like another example of a timber frame base please see the Log Cabin in a Croft post

And more pages:

You may be also interested in other customers buildings posts and thoughts: