Lennart Log Cabin Show Site Build

So as you may or may not know, I (Megan), haven’t been a member of Tuin for very long- which means that my knowledge of Log Cabins and installing them are limited to the posts I’ve read made by Richard.

He often mentions about how easy it is to install a log cabin but honestly, I thought it was mostly him talking from experience so when I was asked to capture the new show site buildings being installed- I decided to take this opportunity to learn as much as I could to improve my blogs and hopefully show you how I have evolved from a DIY newbie to a little less of a newbie. I’m considering of making this a series of all the new show site buildings that will be installed in the upcoming months, maybe we should call it ‘Megan learns some things’ or ‘From DIY newbie to not so newbie’. Obviously those titles are very bad, maybe you could leave a comment for your ideas below.

And also I must disclose, I am not a physical/manual labour type of girl. So my report on this will be through watching the installs, not partaking in them.

So, to get things started… 

The first new Log Cabin on the Show Site will be an updated Lennart Log Cabin to replace the previous one, we’ve even managed to persuade one of our apprentice sales assistants Andrew to join in with the installation, as this will be a great learning experience for him too.

Now, Andrew and I are very similar.. Both at the age of 18 with little DIY experience and always on a keyboard, we were definitely are out of our comfort zone.. Wish us luck!

Lennart Installation Plans

Now Andrew started off confident with this project, with the help of our two experienced servicemen we were confident that the Lennart will be installed by the end of the day! With the base already been made from the previous Lennart, it started off smoothly with Andrew going around in a square to fit in the wall logs.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

With only minor mistakes (such as almost putting in one of the incorrect logs at the front of the building till he soon figured afterwards why I was giggling on the sideline) he was doing well! Maybe he would of been better and avoided this by frequently referring to the Log Cabin plans. Though unfortunately our experienced men found this progress rather slow, so they soon started to help and the walls were quickly heightening.

Incorrect Log Example

If you looked at the log and looked at the plans.. That wouldn’t of happened..

As they reached seven logs (I believe) high, they installed the ‘half log’ for the window. Which turned out to be as simple as sliding the window into the grooves of the half log, when doing this I recommend to add a few of the smaller logs on either side of the designated gap to ensure that the window slid in straight, see below:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Around about this time, Andrew began to structure the doorframe. Please note: That this actually was done the wrong way round (again, might of been avoided with the assistance of the Cabin plans..). Hopefully what I captured should explain what happened and how we resolved it, also take note of the captions of the images for more detail:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

With the doorframe in and a coffee consumed, it didn’t take long at all for the three guys to finish installing the walls of the Log Cabin, then straight onto the Apex. Now, admittedly I thought apex referred to a different material type, but it seems to be the triangular shape (in this case) that connects and supports the wall logs to the roof logs/purlins. Also, I have just been informed that I was likely getting it mixed up with perspex!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

As you can see above, the ‘slanted slots’ (as I call them) are cut out for the purlins on both sides, so all you will have to do is simply slide the purlins into both ended slots. We prefer to screw down the purlins into the apex for more security, it’s not strictly required.

Now… This is where things got repetitive (and slightly boring to watch). The guys then took the first roof board (for the overhang), ensured it was level and used the clout nails to secure the roof board at the top, middle and bottom of the board. Lining up to be nailed on the center purling, the middle/support purling and the cabin wall.

Lennart Overhang Roof Boards

Our roof boards are also made with interlocking timer, so its a fairly simple process to side the next roofboard in place, make sure its align with the previous one and nail it down. The interlocking process kind of reminds me of how you would install laminate flooring. Then you go onto the next one.. Than the next one.. Etc.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

For the last roof board there was a slight overhang, so to make it look neater we marked where the roof boards should finish and cut it to size using a circular saw.

Last Roof Board Adjustments

Then, you guessed it, you repeat with the other side! Admittedly, I left to continue to work in my warm office by the time this was happening. When I returned all of the roof boards were laid down and nailed- hurrah! We also added an edge/trim to the Lennart ready for the guttering to be installed fully leveled, this will happen after the cabin is treated.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

To finish off the body of the Log Cabin, Philip showed me how you would install doors for your Log Cabin. It seems to be a simple process of aligning the middle circular hinge in between the two already on the doorframe and pushing the provided pin in place. During this we had also noted that the door hinges appeared to look rusty, we apologise if this has happened to you. If you notice this on your Log Cabin Doors then please email us with pictures for reference, and our service team will send some new hinges for you to replace.

Double Door Installation

Then, came the monotonous part.. The one everyone tends to get bored of doing.. Fitting roof shingles. The shingles we used for the Lennart Log Cabin was our Red Hexagonal Shingles.  The process was long and I honestly spent most of it in the office, by the time I came downstairs to take this picture below, all enthusiasm and motivation from Andrew’s eyes were fading. He was tired, legs hurt (maybe after a few more show cabins he’ll be used to manual labour..) and was tired of lining up shingles. But it was all worth it in my opinion, by the end of the office day the Lennart was installed! And it looks stunning, amazing job guys!

Red Hexagonal Shingles

Over the next few days the Lennart Log Cabin will be coated with our Clear Carefree Protectant Treatment.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

I hope you enjoyed my view from this article on our new Lennart Log Cabin show building, and a big round of applause for Andrew who helped Wayne and Philip install this beautiful cabin. Let us know if you enjoyed this and wish to see more with our other future show site installs!

After watching this process, it really does seem that Richard wasnt oversimplifying the process- If you read and keep looking at the plans provided and read all of our pages for Fitting Log Cabins, it seems rather easy! Though it may get more complicated as the larger show buildings start to be installed.. And maybe if you yourself are carrying the logs and installing them.. I’ll keep you guys updated!

Again, I believe the process will be easier once you have read our Fitting Advice Pages.

You will also find more specific articles that may help when you look at the ‘Important Information’ tab on our Log Cabin pages.

There are also a few more showsite installation posts, like another one of mine with the Kennet Log Cabin as well as one written by our sales assistant in training, Becky helping with the Daisy Log Cabin and 28mm Storage Annexe!

If you enjoyed this post, you may like our other installation reviews sent in from our customers at: Pictorial Customer Reviews.

Derby Log Cabin Review and Build

Mr F has written a very good article on his experience with us and his building – The Derby 58mm log cabin with some great pictures.

I’m always very interested to hear customers journey and thoroughly appreciate his story, it gives us a lot of insight into our service and product and is very much enjoyed by me and other customers considering a similar journey and project.

There was a few surprises for Mr F, a couple of problems to overcome such is normal when building any substantial structure, we also missed a couple of parts and made some mistakes but it’s a good story to read and one we can learn from ……

Mr F wrote the below and sent in loads of pictures of his journey, I have copied the pictures below his article with some annotation and notes.


We took a long time in deciding which cabin to buy and who to buy it from. Fortunately I came across the website of TUIN and got very interested in reading reviews from clients and Richard’s blog etc. Finally we decided on which cabin to have, placed the order and arranged a delivery date.

I contacted Richard for the sizes of the packages and then started to get concerned as Richard informed me that it would arrive in one package – 6000mm x 1150mm x 650mm +-1600kg and would probably be on a large lorry with a forklift.

The driver contacted me on the day of delivery, apologising that he would be with us late evening if that was OK with us or would we prefer the following day.  We agreed to take delivery asap and as we live in a close, off of a country road, I met him on a nearby main road and took him back to our bungalow by car.  He checked as to whether he could get the lorry up our close and wanted to give it a go.  Very clever maneuvering got him close to our drive.  He offloaded his forklift (very nice piece of kit) and much to my wifes surprise picked up this 6000mm long package, turned the wheels on the forklift and proceed down our drive – It was a side loader, that is what she didn’t expect.

He offloaded the package, had a cup of tea and proceded on his way with our thanks.

Next morning my stepson and I opened this huge package and started moving all the parts to our back garden placing the parts in the vicinity of where the cabin was to be erected.

It is quite daunting when you see all the parts spread out.  However once you start to erect the cabin it goes up fairly quickly.  We did have a problem with a warped board but after checking the website carried on as instructed.  I would agree with a previous reviewer of this product hanging the doors took us a couple of hours before we were happy with the way they closed.  Not difficult, just had to  learn how much to adjust the hinges, before re-hanging the doors each time.

I was not sure how to fit the window as some of the parts were not marked and I could not be sure how it fitted following the diagram.  A quick email to Richard and the problem was solved.  Up onto the roof to finish the planking and then the shingles, they are great.  I have never used them before and I think you will agree they look very professional.

Fitting the barge boards on the gable ends was a problem because we did not have the right timber supplied. Phone call to Karen and replacement timber was arranged for delivery the following day. That’s what I call service. It was impressed on me from the start by the team at Tuin that whatever the problem contact Tuin and they will do their very best to sort it out, and they did.

Now, how to treat the timber. We decided to use Sadolin, not cheap but we want this cabin to last. Seems like a good product, certainly seemed substantial when applying it. Painted inside and out.

Fitted guttering and connected to a large water butt.  As suggested by Richard I dug a small trench around the cabin and filled it with gravel, this mainly to stop the splashes when it rains.  I did not dig the trench quite wide enough, will widen it at a later date.  However, I then used some UPVC barge board (which had a lip) to cover the edge of the base around the cabin and this went down into the gravel.  I then sealed this all the way around the cabin with silicon.  So far it seems to have worked and keeps quite clean.

Next was electrics, dug a trench from the cabin to the back of the bungalow and buried armoured cable, with warning tape half way down the trench (as per instructions from my electrician).  Purchased a couple of LED ceiling lights and arranged for the electrician to connect up the supply and install sockets etc with the strict instructions that he was not to nail/screw anything inside the cabin that would hinder expansion of the timbers.  Yes Richard I am glad I read your blog on what to do and what not to do, very informative.

The floor was next. I used timber joists laid on waterproof membrane, not fixed to the floor or to the cabin. In-filled the joists with fibre glass and topped it with exterior board. Finally my wife chose a laminate floor covering which I then laid. Before I could blink she was moving in, I did not have time to hide the key! Joking aside we are both looking forward to using this cabin as our studio and hobby room. Curtains are up at the window and blinds have been bought for the doors and side panels and I have got to make a pelmet for the window to match the gable end scalloped fascia.

We both are extremely happy with this product. The team at Tuin could not have been more helpful in making it a very nice experience for a couple of oldies and of course not forgetting a stepson for his help.

Sincere best wishes for continued success in your business.

The site of Mr F's Derby Log cabin

The site of Mr F’s Derby Log cabin

Lots of parts, all laid out correctly, it is important to keep the logs on top of each other while the build commences.

Lots of parts, all laid out correctly. It is important to keep the logs on top of each other while the build commences.

The base ready to take the Derby Log cabin. It is pleasing to see this is to the footprint of the building.

The base ready to take the Derby Log cabin. It is pleasing to see this is to the footprint of the building.

The first log layer going down on top of the foundation beams.

The first log layer going down on top of the foundation beams.

Mr F and his 'Installation Team'.

Mr F and his ‘Installation Team’.

The Derby log cabin is starting to grow.

The Derby log cabin is starting to grow.

Mr F came across a warped board. This can sometimes happen as wood moves when unsupported, seldom is this a problem though and can very easily be overcome.

Mr F came across a warped board. This can sometimes happen as wood moves when unsupported, seldom is this a problem though and can very easily be overcome.

It's always important to check that the base logs remain square throughout the build. If the bottom logs are square the top ones will follow.

It’s always important to check that the base logs remain square throughout the build. If the bottom logs are square the top ones will follow.

Three sides going up on the Derby log cabin.

Three sides going up on the Derby log cabin.

Window and door opening in the Derby log cabin

Window and door opening in the Derby log cabin

11-window-space

Gables have been put up. This is generally the most hardest part of the install. Gables are very heavy and unstable at this point.

Gables have been put up. This is generally the most hardest part of the install. Gables are very heavy and unstable at this point.

Once the purlins are in the roof then becomes stable and roof boards can be nailed on.

Once the purlins are in the roof then becomes stable and roof boards can be nailed on.

Roof boards are now being fixed to the purlins. Two nails on each board across each fixing point.

Roof boards are now being fixed to the purlins. Two nails on each board across each fixing point.

Checking the log cabin is vertical.

Checking the log cabin is vertical.

Doors have been fitted. This always takes a little adjustment to get 100% correct.

Doors have been fitted. This always takes a little adjustment to get 100% correct.

All the roof boards on the log cabin have been nailed on correctly.

All the roof boards on the log cabin have been nailed on correctly.

Adding a leading edge support. Carpenter clamps are an essential tool to use in the installation of a log cabin.

Adding a leading edge support. Carpenter clamps are an essential tool to use in the installation of a log cabin.

Felt shingles are being fitted. Shingles are FAR better than roofing felt and highly recommended.

Felt shingles are being fitted. Shingles are FAR better than roofing felt and highly recommended.

Perfect spacing and care taken over the shingle install will ensure it looks amazing, lasts years and you do not run out from those supplied.

Perfect spacing and care taken over the shingle install will ensure it looks amazing, lasts years and you do not run out from those supplied.

I'm pleased to see a damp proof membrane on top of the base, this saves damp coming up. Mr F is then using rockwool or similar to insulate the floor. I recommend every cabin has a floor insulated as a lot of heat is lost through here.

I’m pleased to see a damp proof membrane on top of the base, this saves damp coming up. Mr F is then using rockwool or similar to insulate the floor. I recommend every cabin has a floor insulated as a lot of heat is lost through here.

you do not need to order our T&G spruce floor if you are using an alternative floor covering.

You do not need to order our T&G spruce floor if you are using an alternative floor covering.

Mr F read my recommendations regarding electrics in log cabins and is installing as such.

Mr F read my recommendations regarding electrics in log cabins and is installing as such.

The finished Derby 58mm log cabin, the front step entrance built by Mr F.

The finished Derby 58mm log cabin, the front step entrance built by Mr F.

Guttering added by Mr F. We also offer guttering kits but this looks a great install as well. Guttering is important to use with your log cabin, whether from us or other suppliers - it is often overlooked but like your house it does make a difference to longevity.

Guttering added by Mr F. We also offer guttering kits but this looks a great install as well. Guttering is important to use with your log cabin, whether from us or other suppliers – it is often overlooked but like your house it does make a difference to longevity.

Mrs F moved into the Derby log cabin before he did!

Mrs F moved into the Derby log cabin before he did!

The final finished log cabin with Mr F's flourishes of design including the bargeboards which really set the log cabin off.

The final finished log cabin with Mr F’s flourishes of design including the bargeboards which really set the log cabin off.

Thank you Mr F, I thoroughly enjoyed your article and story. It is much appreciated and also helps other people undertaking a similar project. I hope you have enjoyed the present we sent. If you require any other of our products in the future please let me know personally and I can arrange a further discount for you.

Other customer experiences, builds and ideas can be enjoyed here: Pictorial Tuin Reviews

Log Cabin Export – Islonia

I took a road trip for our family holiday this year – a road trip to Scotland taking a slow week to get there, and a quicker route to get back. There were ulterior motives though! Perhaps, rather sadly, they were Log Cabin and customer related (even on holiday!).

We have been dealing with a lovely customer periodically over the last few years;

Mr McWhinney has been a customer since 2013 and he has ordered four log cabins from us over this time. Jos who looks after sales and is also my wife was fascinated with his stories and where the log cabins were and what they were being used for during her conversations with him, and had built up quite a rapport.

Jos suggested this should be at least one of the places we visit whilst in Scotland – Jos is as daft as I am when it comes to our buildings and what finally happens to them after we have delivered them – we have the big build up, the delivery and then rarely hear anything again so it’s always nice to see what happens to them and the ongoing story of their life and the people behind them.

Unbeknown to Jos or I we were actually visiting Royalty and another country and had been exporting our log cabins all this time without knowing it and not even declared it to the VAT man or listed it on the monthly INTRASTAT return!

Our destination was Dry Island in Badachro, Scotland.

Dry Island in Badachro

Dry Island in Badachro, Gairloch

The story developed once we were there and discovered that in 2010 Dry Island was declared a Micronation and was now named Islonia, with Mr McWhinney and his wife the King and Queen of the nation!

Jos had been primarily fascinated with the Shellfish safaris that were run from the Island and she quickly booked this up when we arrived at our cottage in Badachro and after visiting our first Islonian log cabin known as the ‘Islonia Embassy’.

Lennart 58mm log cabin

The Islonia Embassy on the quay using one of our 58mm Lennart log cabins

Lennart 58mm log cabin

Lennart 58mm log cabin

The Lennart Log Cabin is ideally suited as an ’embassy’ and somewhere for Islonia customers to book up their Shellfish Safari, strong and sturdy at 58mm and double glazed, it does make a rather splendid embassy!

I always like to check installations of log cabins when I see them just in case and although this one is perfect, I would prefer to see a storm kit applied to it. It is rather exposed on the quay side and although fixed down to the base, the canopy at the front is rather large, so I will be sending out one for the Embassy.

Opposite the Islonia embassy was another cabin that looked suspiciously like one of our Clockhouse Log Cabin, it is the identical building but I didn’t get to speak to the owners to be sure.

Clockhouse log cabin in 45mm and double glazed

Clockhouse log cabin in 45mm and double glazed

Having booked our trip, we headed for the island across the incredible floating bridge – known as the ‘bridge over the Atlantic’.

Bridge to Islonia - Dry Island at high tide

Bridge to Islonia – Dry Island at high tide

Bridge to the Island at low tide

Bridge to the Island at low tide

After the bridge we were met with our second log cabin:

The Islonia boarder

The Islonia border

Peter 34mm log cabin being used for passport control, border duties and occasional snacks

Peter 34mm log cabin being used for passport control, border duties and occasional snacks sold by the Islonia residents (two small children generally)

We boarded the Zephyr, one of Mr McWhinnie’ boats;

The view from Islonia quay with the Zephyr the bottom right hand corner.

The view from Islonia quay with the Zephyr the bottom right hand corner.

Mr McWhinnie explained a great deal about Creel fishing, the history and area.

Mr McWhinnie explained a great deal about Creel fishing, the history and the area and allowed us to handle many a creature, my children were fascinated as was Jos and I.

Langoustine caught in the traditional manner and exported across the world in 24 hours.

Langoustine caught in the traditional manner and exported across the world in 24 hours.

I highly recommend this tour if you are in the area, links to this are above. Mr McWhinnie was very welcoming and invited us to see the other two log cabins he had from us, one was being used for ‘Glamping’ (we had tried to book this for ourselves but was fully booked all year so get in early!)

Coventry 58mm log cabin, double glazed and being used for glamping on the Islonia Island.

Coventry 58mm log cabin, double glazed and being used for glamping on the Islonia Island.

Coventry 58mm log cabin, perfect for a glamping project.

Coventry 58mm log cabin, perfect for a glamping location.

Coventry log cabin kitchen area is in the annexe to the side.

Coventry log cabin kitchen area is in the annexe to the side.

For ablutions ... the Turdis was to the side.

For ablutions … the Turdis was to the side.

Fully kitted out inside for a family of four to enjoy their glamping on their own private island.

Fully kitted out inside for a family of four to enjoy their glamping on their own private island.

Looking the other side of the coventry log cabin was a set of bunkbeds for the children.

Looking the other side of the Coventry Log Cabin was a set of bunkbeds for the children.

The ‘Bothy’ as it was referred to (Bothies are to be found in remote, mountainous areas of Scotland, Northern England, Ireland and Wales.) was well hidden on the island, a gorgeous, hidden retreat and one I will stay in one day.

Hidden in the woods was the Bothy.

Hidden in the woods was the Bothy.

Perhaps more was hidden in those woods than we knew about

Perhaps more was hidden in those woods than we knew about

Mr McWhinnie and I

The ‘Bothy’ in Islonia, our third log cabin exported to the micronation.

Our fourth and last log cabin was a little harder to see, we approached it from the water in a small boat.

A smaller boat for a trip to see the fourth cabin and the pub!

A smaller boat (bottom right) for a trip to see the fourth cabin and the pub across the Loch!

A past, long forgotten civilisation?

As we approached the other small island ….. A past, long forgotten, civilisation?

A tad cheeky!

We approached further ….. A tad cheeky!

OUr fourth log cabin export, the lovely Idonea

Our fourth log cabin export, the lovely Idonea. The Idonea was built mainly by the children on the island, it still needs finishing with the roof shingles and treatment but it was lovely to see her being enjoyed as a hideaway somewhere so remote.

This is my personal blog but I cannot bore you more with pictures of my holiday, suffice to say Mr McWhinnie’s and Islonia is a lovely place to visit – if you are in the area please pop in or better still enjoy our cabin and the Islonia Experience

I had tried to visit other customers in Scotland while I was there but never want to intrude, I visited the Isle of Skye and saw our cabin at the Skye Shepherd Huts.

Mr McWhinnie and I agreed one of our shepherd huts would be great for Glamping on the islands ….

Shepherd hut is an ideal building for glamping on the islands or surrounding area.

Shepherd hut is an ideal building for glamping on the islands or surrounding area. This one is mine with my very loved Hebridean sheep enjoying living under it.

Hebridean Sheep

Genuine Hebridean Sheep on the Isle of Skye – they need a hut too!

We also agreed other plans for a year or two ahead with the supply of an Edelweiss as a bigger project for glamping and holiday lets in the area and I look forward to exporting an Edelweiss to the Island or surrounding areas:

Edelweiss log cabin in 70mm.

Edelweiss log cabin in 70mm.

Before I leave this post, Badachro showed up two other interesting things;

One …. the timber frame base used on the Coventry log cabin but a better one locally which was amazing …….

Timber frame base used for the Coventry log cabin.

Timber frame base used for the Coventry log cabin.

Amazing timber frame base.

Amazing timber frame base on a timber building.

And lastly …… our Log Cabin Roof Shingles being used on several houses locally …… these are amazing shingles and often we offer free shingles with log cabins.

IKO roof shingles used on one of the houses locally.

IKO roof shingles used on one of the houses locally.

We rarely hear from customers once we have delivered the product, we love to hear the stories and adventures and to follow up with a story of what happens next and maybe even visit. If you would like to feature in my blog please let me know.

Stian Log Cabin Review

I love it when customer join in on my blog and Dr K kindly sent in a review of his journey with his Stian 58mm Double Glazed Log Cabin, his comments after he sent it in made my day:


I’m glad that the reviews might be useful and would of course be happy for you to use them as you see fit.  Thank you for your generous offer, it’s very kind, although one of the main reasons that I chose Tuin above the various competition is your blog, partly as a useful resource, but also because of the honesty and detail, that you admit flaws and genuinely appear to care that your customers are happy and not mislead about them.  If I can contribute to that in some small way, I am happy to.

This is Dr K’s journey and review with an accompanying video that was made a little while after:

I am very happy with my Stian Log cabin. My intent was to use it as a workshop, but now that it’s built, I think it might end up being the second house at the bottom of our garden! I certainly don’t think that it will be any sort of refuge from the children – they love it.

The quality of the cabin is excellent – the 58mm logs are reassuringly substantial and the whole structure feels very solid. The one caveat on this is that the door-frame is not engineered to the same beautiful standard as the rest of the cabin. (As a word of advice, make sure you at least offer the doors up before you mount the frame – it is easy to get the two vertical panels swapped and upside down, which is annoying when you come to hang the doors. Don’t ask me how I know this.)

The service I have received from Tuin has been unimpeachable – the response times (at all times of day) are fantastic. There were two items in the pallet that had suffered minor damage; advice was given on how to repair and use one and a replacement for the other was quickly shipped.

The delivery service is pretty impressive. The delivery company were able to give me a pretty good estimate, on the day, of what time the lorry would arrive, which was useful and something that more mundane delivery companies could learn from. The lorry was huge and couldn’t get onto our little cul-de-sac, but that proved not to be a problem as the excellent fork-lift truck it came with, under the skilful control of the driver, was exceptionally manoeuvrable, could drive sideways and spin on the spot and managed to drop the (very large) pallet neatly on the drive.

delivery delivery-1

The pallet is cleverly packed to minimise the size, which is not inconsiderable (5.4m long, weighing 1.3tons!) although this does mean that the cabin jigsaw is pretty well shuffled.  

You really need to unpack it and sort the timber by type/length before you start the assembly.  Once you have done that, everything is pretty self-explanatory, although I would definitely watch all the instruction videos on the Tuin website.

Stian log cabin unpacked and ready to build

I looked at various sheds of similar basic design from other manufacturers, but I am happy that Tuin offered the best value for money out there. Reading the Tuin blog, there is a genuine passion for log cabins, things made of wood and for customer satisfaction that I found very refreshing and reassuring. There is a lot of useful technical insight there too – well worth reading.

Regarding the build, I would suggest that you don’t underestimate the amount of work involved – the construction of the cabin itself is a pretty straightforward (and really rather good fun) days work for two if you are basically fit and know how to swing a hammer without smashing your own fingers. That said, the preparatory work of clearing the ground, laying a proper (square and level) base, unpacking the pallet and sorting the timber is pretty taxing – it might be worth getting a builder involved if you haven’t done anything similar before.

Base for the log cabin

Base for the log cabin completed

In my case the total time taken so far is 4 days; 1.5 days to clear the site, put up square and level shuttering; 0.5 day to lay the concrete base; 1 day to erect the cabin, 1 day to fit the shingles.  I have yet to paint the cabin, but would imagine that will take another solid day..

Stian log cabin build

Stian 58mm log cabin almost complete

Stian log cabin completed other than the bargeboards

Stian log cabin completed other than the bargeboards

All in all this is an excellent product, from an excellent company and I am very happy with my purchase.

One final word of warning – you will engender shed envy in your friends and neighbours. Be warned!.

Thank you Dr K for your contribution to my blog. Reviews and insights help us and other customers greatly and it is very much appreciated. Please let me know when you would like to order the extra shingles we spoke about and we can apply the discount for you as a thank you.

Other customer experiences, build and ideas are here:Pictorial Tuin Reviews

Derby Log Cabin Tuin Review

It’s lovely when customers pass on their findings with their experience with their log cabin, as it helps other customers so much in understanding what they are letting themselves in for!

It also gives them ideas and thoughts on how best to complete their project and with what product. It’s also good for us to know if there have been any niggles or problems and to try address them for future customers.

Mr M was kind enough to send us a factual presentation of his building in a PowerPoint presentation, I have copied it below, it is for his new Derby 58mm Double Glazed Log Cabin


The Site

The following pages show the construction of our log cabin. The whole process took about 6 weeks, although it could all have been done much more quickly if I hadn’t been limited to weekends and holidays. The foundations took a week; putting up the walls (with windows and doors) took a day; the wooden roof (with insulation covered by shingles) took a couple of days; then lots of evenings painting, sanding, waxing, etc…

The log cabin was to stand in the corner of the garden, on sloping ground. The ground slopes away towards the fence at the back and there’s a height difference of about 18” from front to back. I first marked out the footprint of the cabin and cleared the turf.

Timber Frame

Foundations

I built a timber frame for the cabin to sit on.

The perimeter consists of 2”x6” timber (laminated together to form a base 4” wide to support the log cabin walls).  The floor joists (2”x4” are at 30cm centres and the whole thing sits on 4” posts concreted into the ground. (This took ages – I hadn’t finished them all when this photo was taken – the joists aren’t fixed here…)

The foundations for the log cabin

The foundations for the log cabin

This photo shows the height difference between the front and back of the cabin. Getting the posts level and square was a difficult (but important!) part of the build.

The joists are supported on joist hangers at the perimeter and on lengths
of 2”x4” that run across the foundations (attached to wooden posts). Two of these are visible in the picture – I put in another one before fixing the joists.

 

Timber frame base for the log cabin

Timber frame base for the log cabin

The Flat Pack Arrives!

The cabin arrived and was unloaded from the lorry with a forklift.

It’s a pretty impressive flat-pack!

I unpacked all the parts and separated them by length/type. This is best done by two people – most parts can be lifted by one person but the doors/windows and some of the longest logs need two people.

The log cabin arrives

The log cabin arrives

Walls Going Up

The walls went up very quickly. Once the first few layers are in place (and square), it’s an easy job.

The windows and doors are a little trickier. With the doors, I made one mistake – I didn’t put the door sill in-between the two side panels. I managed to fix this later. (The door sill wasn’t shown on the instructions but it’s obvious where it goes once you know what it is!)

Log cabin walls going up

Log cabin walls going up

Nearly There

Up to this point took perhaps 6 hours.

Nearly there in the build

Nearly there in the build

Doors

Getting the doors to meet in the middle was a bit of a challenge – not helped by the fact that I hadn’t noticed the door sill (see the silvery thing in the picture below!)

It probably took a couple of hours to get the doors hung properly – lots of adjustment of the hinges, which wasn’t difficult to do.

The door handle and lock were easy to fit.

Log cabin doors

Log cabin doors

Silvery thing - The door threshold

Silvery thing – The door threshold

Roof

The roof is made of more than 120 wooden slats, nailed to the purlins and the walls. Because we want to use the cabin in winter, I added 70mm thick insulation on top of the slats, with shingles nailed to the wood through the insulation. You can see the insulation in the picture below.

I had never used shingles before – they are great! They overlap to create a double layer and they look an awful lot better than shed felt.

Log cabin roof

Log cabin roof

Floor

Once the roof was finished, I put in the wooden floor, nailed to the joists. There’s a layer of 100mm insulation under the floor, fitted snugly between the floor joists.

After this photo was taken, I used a nail punch to make sure the nails all sat a few millimetres below the surface; I then sanded the floor. Then applied a sealing oil and finishing wax.

Log cabin floor

Log cabin floor

Fireplace

We wanted to put a wood burning stove in the cabin so I built a constructional hearth from concrete blocks. (I left a space 90cm x 90cm in the floor for this, i.e. the hearth foundations are on the ground, not on the timber frame).

Behind the stove, I fixed a layer of fire-proof board to the walls using batons. The photo shows the channels for the screws, which should allow the wall logs to expand and contract.

Allowance for expansion

Allowance for expansion

The hearth is finished with 2 slate slabs.

Behind the stove, the fire-proof board is tiled with stone tiles and the mantelpiece and wooden surround are made from off-cuts of fence posts! They are held together with Velcro(!) and the wood can be removed easily to allow access to the screws that fix the batons to the wall.

The stove was fitted by a HETAS approved engineer. The twin-skin flue goes straight up through the wooden roof.

Different stoves have different clearances to combustible materials – this one sits safely about 30cm in front of the wall.

Woodburning stove in a log cabin

Woodburning stove in a log cabin

Chimney flue

Chimney flue

Light

I installed a solar-powered light.

This was very fiddly! A solar panel on the roof charges a battery (which is stored in a ventilated box in the corner). There is a light switch by the door (not visible in the photo).

The light is great in the evenings – the single bulb is perfectly adequate for a cabin this size (roughly 4m square internally).

solar light

solar light

Finally

The outside of the cabin was painted with three layers of Sadolin.

I built a wooden deck in front of the doors.

The stove flue protrudes almost two metres above the roof to make sure there is sufficient up-draught.

Derby Log Cabin

Derby Log Cabin

Now that the cabin is built, we’re using it as an outdoor playroom.

Playroom log cabin

Playroom log cabin

There’s loads of room for furniture and it’s a lovely place to play or just to sit – especially in the Summer sun!

We’re looking forward to getting the stove going so that we can have a warm outdoor retreat in winter.

Review

Mr M was also kind enough to leave a review on the Derby 58mm log cabin, he wrote:

We bought a 58mm Derby Log Cabin (4m x 4m internally) a few weeks ago.

The quality of the cabin is excellent – the logs are cut very accurately and it’s very easy to put together (like Lego for grown-ups!). The whole thing is very solid. The instructions are minimal but it’s not difficult to work out what goes where if you take the time to sort ALL of the pieces in the pack first. The only problem I encountered was that the parts of the door frame weren’t on the plans and I ended up building the door frame and then having to re-assemble it when I realised I’d missed a bit! The shingles for the roof seem really sturdy and the finished cabin looks exactly like it does on the website. Excellent service too – thoroughly recommended.

Thank you Mr M

Thank you for taking the time to write this, it is very much appreciated and I hope you are pleased with the thank you present we sent you.

You may like to see what other customer experiences, build and ideas are here: Pictorial Tuin Reviews

Rorik ideal as an office Log Cabin

Brand new on this week is a lovely building recently been designed for our Private Label Range of Log Cabins>.

The Rorik Log Cabin is in 58mm wall logs and is double glazed and perfect for use as a garden office, we’ve purposefully kept the side walls free of windows so there is maximum space for desks, cabinets, shelves etc normally found in a garden office.

It’s cheap too!  In fact I can’t find anything similar at the price it is.  Some garden office suppliers charge fortunes but you can create exactly the same thing with the addition of insulation in the roof and floor.  Using at least 50mm Celotex or similar will give you an equal R value all around.

A handy log cabin being 4.0m x 4.0m, up to now we’ve only had this size in the standard range of 34mm or 28mm wall logs.  This make a nice addition.  To the front is a good sized canopy of 1.40m which gives the occupant inside a good layer of shade.  With the addition of some decking boards this will also make a lovely veranda.

I do think this will become a best seller of ours, it may even make it into the catalogue next year.

The New Rorik Garden Office Log Cabin in 58mm logs

The new Rorik 58mm log cabin, a perfect sized building to make a great garden office