Ongoing Log Cabin Maintenance

Hello and welcome to what we hope will be a useful guide towards the ongoing maintenance of your log cabin,.. yes it may come as a surprise to some but just like a lot things in this world, log cabins do need to be given some attention every now and then to ensure they operate as intended.

As much as we would love to provide you with a completley self contained product that requires zero maintenance it simply isn’t possible with this sort of building.

Please expect to have to perform the odd bit of aftercare.

Firstly lets just have a brief recap on how our log cabins are made so we can all get in the right frame of mind, by now you may have already installed your log cabin which means you will of already read our comprehensive online Installation manual, Or perhaps you’re still in the planning phase.. Either way we would suggest viewing the above to gain more clarity and perspective on the whole project.

Before I started working here, When I thought about “log cabins” I would immediately cast my mind to the wooden buildings seen in films made from round tree logs sitting in a snowy forest somewhere nice and peaceful.

Snowy Log Cabin

Yes Please

Who wouldn’t want to buy one of these right!.. although you may need to make some life adjustments or sell a kidney to stump up the funds for this sort of project.

Our Log cabins are made a little differently and we like to think more financially and garden friedly, they consist of flat solid wall logs in a range of different thicknesses, stacked ontop of one another which then interlock in the corners with Wind and Weather Proof Connections.

TUIN Log Thicknesses

28mm – 70mm Log cabin logs

These wall logs will in most cases rest on what we call Foundation Beams to bring them up and off your base, These foundation beams as a minimum will be pressure treated for longevity.

Standard foundation beam being used in a build

Basic Foundation Beams

Our basic foundation beams being used, protecting the first layer of wall logs

After the walls are up you then turn your attention to the roof, These come in different styles and sizes of course but the principle around them is the same. You start with the purlins/rafters then the roof boards are fitted ontop to create the solid wooden surface to fix your roof covering to.

Lauren log Cabin being built

The roof being assembled on our Lauren 70mm Log cabin

Then low and behold!.. you have yourself a whole new building ready to be used for whatever you can imagine. looking for Inspiration?

Completed Lauren log cabin

A completed Lauren Log cabin

Easy Right… for some more information about fitting out buildings please also visit our Fitting Tips page.

So there we have it, thats the building up and ready to use but how do you keep it looking and performing as it should and what other considerations should you be thinking about to keep it a fully functional, problem free living space.

Perhaps the best way to go through some of the key points will be to break the cabin down into six areas .

  • The Base for the cabin
  • The Foundation beams
  • The Walls of the cabin
  • The Doors and windows
  • The Roof
  • Additional hardware and extras

Bases

The base is the first thing that gets laid and is critical for both the longevity of your building and its actual construction, i’m not here to talk about what base you should or shouldn’t use as all these details can be found with in our Base Support page already and in reality theres very little you should ever need to do to maintain it which is lucky as it becomes very inaccessible with a lump of a log cabin sitting on top.

However something to look out for would be subsidence, Let’s say you have a concrete slab, or a compact base with slabs ontop.. with the weight of the cabin ontop has it sunk it some places?.. hopefully not but its worth keeping that in mind to check if you find yourself with a misbehaving building.

Or perhaps you have built the cabin ontop of a raised Timber Platform and under the weight of the building one or more of the corners have sunk throwing out the top level like this unlucky customers did.

A sinking timber base

See the gap?.. Customers timber base had sunk in the middle

Luckily for this customer the timber base was fairly accessible from underneath so he was able to add additional support to bring it back level

Another important aspect of a base is damp proofing, using a Damp Proof Course ( DPC for short ) or a Damp Proof Membrane ( DPM ).

A DPC is generally used underneath your foundation beams, its purpose is to protect the underside of your foundations from rising moisture seeping up through your base as well as providing protection against ingress from the outside.

There are other ways to achieve the same level of protection, My favorite is to use a TAR product, painted on both the underside of the foundation beams and ontop of the base that they sit on.. applying this thickly will also service in sealing the perimeter helping prevent ingress.

A DPM is used underneath the concrete slab or ontop of it, This will again protect the underside of the cabin/floor from moisture that tries to rise up from and through your base into the building.

Advice on using a Damp proof course in your base.

Advice on damp proofing

Ideas for Damp proofing

Preventing this moisture from rising up within the building is very important, it can cause unwanted growth with in the building as well as other Unwanted Issues.

garden-furniture-mold

Mold with in a cabin

Nasty right!

Ventilation does play a big part in preventing this as well which we will cover in a moment but if you notice that a once dry and mold free cabin starts to experience these types of problems then a review of your damp proofing may just be in order.

Foundation Beams

Now these are also very important and often in truth the cause of great confusion at first with our more traditional shed building customers.

So just qucikly, Unlike a shed where you would expect to see a row of bearers all running the same direction with a floor built directly ontop..

A normal Shed is built on top of a floor with joists underneath it

Typical shed base

A typical shed with bearers running the same way

The Foundation Beams servce a different purpose for this type of building. they only span under the perimeter of the cabin (as well as any internal walls that might be featured).. What they DO NOT do is span in the middle where the floor goes later on.

Their purpose is to raise the first logs off and away from the base which in turn protects them and provides added room in the middle for a floating floor

We have different types of foundation beams to offer but they all serve the same purpose and will generally sit ontop of your base with a DPC in between. This will generally be enough to keep unwanted ingress from entering your cabin but where two foundations beams butt join together you should think about enhancing these connections with a decent sealant/sealer.

Walls Of the cabin

Treatment

Well here we go, We are starting to get into this now as once the walls are up you can finally start to get a good feel for your log cabin, as we mentioned before the walls are made from individual logs stacked ontop of one another to from a very solid wall, They interlock in the corners with fancy Wind and Weather Proof Connections which go along way to ensure that your cabin remains water tight… But as we also explain this isn’t where the story ends and you cannot just leave the logs as as they are and expect the building to be watertight which leads us swiftly onto a very important part of maintaining your log cabin which is TREATMENT

So let’s start by asking a question.. What is Wood?

Wood is basically a Sponge and this is how you must treat each individual part of your cabin, if you zoom right into the endgrain you will see that it’s made from straws all joined together which was once used to draw water and nutrients to the parts of the poor tree that once needed it.

Wood is a sponge and is made up of straws all drawing water for the tree.

Close up of timber

Wood is a sponge and is made up of straws all drawing water for the tree

You can easily see from these pictures that when we look closely, wood is full of holes and it’s these little buggers that will be causing a problem as they all fill with water or, drain of water as seeing as we killed the poor thing there is no tension of water to rely on.

For an untreated piece of wood especially this is happening constantly, it’s trying to reach the same moisture content as the surrounding air. This is known a Relative Humidity and is a measurement of the amount of moisture in the air around us.

In the summer the wood will expel moisture and shrink, In the winter they will absorb moisture and swell which will loosen and tighten the joints where the logs interlock.

Prevention

A lot of customers will fairly just assume that “treatment” is only applied to safeguard the wood, stop it from rotting ect but in truth this is just one of its benefits. Treatment is also there to try and limit this natural movement as much as possible , We want to limit the amount those sponges can absorb and expel moisture by clogging up the straws contained with in.. we do this by reaching the recommended depth of microns.

A decent treatment should provide the following benefits

  • Protect the surface from weathering (including UV damage)
  • Seal wood on wood joints with in the cabins construction
  • Reach the required micon depth ( 80-120 microns ) which helps limit natural movement
  • Provide the desired finish for appearance

More information on Timber Treatment specifically can be found within the other support articles we offer

I hope the above all makes sense as it then leads on to the ongoing maintenance of your cabins walls. They must be treated and they must be treated well, please do not expect to only have to treat your building once throughout its life time and Please Please Please use a decent treatment in the first place.. To many times have we had angry customers over the phone shouting, screaming at how dreadful it all is and how disappointed they have become….to only find that they hadn’t applied enough coats, hadn’t kept up with the re-treatments or instead used a lets say “less expensive” brand in the first place.

We recommend our own Tuin Treatments or specific ones found locally such as Sikkens, Sadolins and Kingfisher which we know work well at achieving the desired depth of penetration.

You will not cut the movement out entirely which is fine because the building is designed to handle a certain amount without any fuss.

So as the logs of the cabin move ( which they will ) you may then need to re-treat certain areas of your walls, Paying particular attention to the end grain and interlocking notches where they join another wall, these are the most vulnerable parts. You will also need to make note and follow the manufacturer’s guidelines in terms of reapplying dates.

Overgrowth around the cabin.

This part is mainly aimed towards landscaping and storage rather than the cabin itself.

I’ll start by repeating one of our bold statements that we confidently make about the properties of timber, .. Wood will never Rot … we promise… Well, we also go onto say that so long as it is always ventilated, . so if it gets wet and is then allowed to dry it will be fine.

but what if it can’t dry?, What if air can never reach some parts of your cabin due to overgrowth, shrubbery, stacked rocks, Muck ect…

What if you decide to store things right up against the side of the cabins wall such as logs for a burner and leave them there for a few years while they season..

All of a sudden the wood will not be able to breath, vent and dry, Water could then sit there all winter which will eventually cause you all sorts of grief

Please be mindful of your walls, Make sure they are free from direct contact with anything which could cause a water trap, keep ontop of your gardening in those hard to reach areas as if you allow overgrowth to take over it can really ruin your day… you may even decide to call us.. complaining about the timber quality in the first place… “sorry but its wood” we will tell you.. “it only rots if its not allowed to vent” we will try and explain… you won’t like that.

Daisy log cabin

A Daisy log cabin free on all sides allowing decent circulation

Movement In log cabins

As we know by now the walls of the cabin move as the logs Expand and Contract throughout the seasons, the design allows for that just fine.

But what if you want to fix something to the wall like a mounted TV bracket or some shelving to store those garden tools.. I always tell people they can do whatever they like to these types of buildings so long as they follow the golden rule which is.. “You must always allow for vertical movement with in the logs” further explained with in our Dealing with Expansion and Contraction page

Another consideration for some, if your cabin happens to feature vertical posts that supports a canopy or large overhang you will need to periodically check that the adjustable post anchor that we supplied is set at the right height to match the rest of the cabin.

So let’s say you happen to own a building like our Kennet log Cabin

Kennet Log cabin

Our 28mm Kennet Log cabin

Remembering that the wall logs expand and contract, that front post will need to be adjusted from time to time as the seasons change becuase it will not move to the same extent, This is achieved by simply adjusting the nut that sits beneath the smaller plate on the anchor.

Post anchor being adjusted

Post support being adjusted

Doors and windows

I think the best way to approach this section will be to start by gently reminding you that just like the walls, The doors and windows are predominantly made from wood, you remember all of those straws?.. Sponges.. yup this wood is no different

Sure,..the doors and windows tend to be made from timbers which are laminated together which does improve their strength and reduces the possibility of movement but its still wood and it still has those straws.

Treatment

The correct treatment of the wall logs is very important.. but I would personally say that the correct treatment of the doors and windows is even more so and here’s why

Unlike the logs, The doors and windows do not have the same luxury of being fully and always supported.. The wall logs are locked in place and would do well to move in any unexpected sense.. but the same cannot be said for the swinging doors and windows… they are only connected to the cabin via hinges which means if the level of treatment isn’t correct or sufficient you may eventually encounter unwanted warps or twists to occur making them much harder to operate.

When first delivered the doors and windows normally arrive deep with in the pallet, This is on purpose as it provides needed support and compression while in an untreated state to prevent warps and twists… but at the very least the pallets are always banded tightly.

Doors packed within a log cabin package to protect them especially from warping

How our doors and windows come packed

Doors packaged with in the log cabin package to provide compression, preventing movement

You then unpack the doors and windows, Please store them flat and again under compression until ready for installation and treatment. While in situ you need to be very attentive with your treatment and often customers will not give them the attention they sorely require. Treatment should be applied both sides evenly and heavily.. To many times we have had customers upset becuase their doors have warped and to find out after that they didn’t treat it fully or correctly..

An extremely warped door.

A twisted/bowed door

A very twisted door, Do we think this was stored correctly prior to installation?

Hardware

Luckily, even the most twisted door can be corrected with the simple application of a Turn Button or Key,.. you would of already seen these in action in gardens throughout your life time i’m sure as we explain within our other Support Page so don’t panic too much but like most things prevention is better than a cure.

Please keep ontop of your door and window treatment.

Let’s move onto those hinges that we mentioned earlier, The doors and windows will come with their own style of hinges so you can operate and use them.. A lot of the time they are cup hinges that look similar to this

Two piece hinge forming a cup and spiggot. These can adjust the door in both planes.

Hinges commonly found on our buildings

Typical Cup Hinges

Now remembering what we discussed before, while treatment will limit the amount those pesky straws can absorb and expel moisture.. it will not cut it out entirely. You will at some point need to adjust the hinges of your doors and windows so please expect to do so, We go into more detail about this with in our other Support Page

A lot of the windows we send are top hung which operate from the inside via a simple Window Stay, we have all seen them and they do the job nicely

Its always easier to pre-treat the windows and doors before they are fitted so you can be sure of full coverage but sometimes this isn’t always possible. or perhaps it’s just time to recoat them following the manufacturer’s guidelines.

Top Hung Window

Common type of top hung window on our Emma Log cabin

If you find yourself having to unhang this type of window from the cabin please be aware of an important Safety point before you proceed. The hinges are only designed to keep the window in place with in the constraints of the supplied window stay which means if you lift it up further, the hanging part which contains the glass could slide off. Be ready to take the weight and seek help from another if needed.

Window Stay Limitations

Be careful when lifting the window beyond the stay limitations

While on the subject of door/window furniture, let’s also talk briefly about the actual locking parts, The cylinder, mechanism, latches ect

These are pretty much self contained but some considerations should be made such as occasionally adding some lubricant with in the metal workings so everything operates as it should.. you don’t want the metal parts seizing up.. also consider oiling the exposed elements to keep rust and corrosion at bay.

Also think about fitting a traditional hook and eye’s for your doors so that during use you can keep them securely open, what we don’t want is the wind catching your new doors and smashing them against the walls… thats how things break which nobody wants.

Hook and Eyes

Hook and Eyes being used on our Chloe log cabin

Glass

That’s about it for the actual hardware, but what about the glass that lets in that sought after natural lighting.. what do we possibly need to consider in terms of maintenance.

The panes of glass are dry fitted into a rebate contained with in the door or window, this is all done prior to delivery as it’s much safer to transport while in place.

The panes of glass can always be accessed if ever needed, they’re only held in by wooden beading which can be Removed With ease as we show with in our Glass Support Article

How the glass is held in place

Glass held in place with removable wooden beading

There’s a few things that we need to think about and one of them which is often not really considered is the seal between the glass and that wooden beading.. is it sufficient?

Going back to treatment by this point you will have fully treated both sides of your window or door right up to the glass.. This alone will typically be enough to prevent water from encroaching between the two surfaces and finding a way into the cabin.

You may also ask yourself, Surely they will come pre-sealed in some way right.. why wouldn’t they be…..?!

Well actually no, they do not. The glass is just dry fitted inside the rebate of frame… thats not becuase we couldn’t be bothered or we’re just trying to save a few pennies on some silicone here in the office to keep the accountants off our backs. It is dry fitted for good reasons!

Firstly, While the packing team do their best to pack the pallets in the safest way possible, we are talking about several tons of a log cabin being moved around and transported over huge distances by several hauliers so things can happen and your glass could arrive damaged ( rare but possible ) .. its glass.. it can break!

For those of you that have used silicone before you will know that it can act abit like glue at times.. so in the unlikely event that you receive your cabin and some of the glass is broken its then an absolute nightmare and down right dangerous to go around and dislodge the broken shards from the inner frame and in the past when units were delivered pre-sealed we received right ear falls from angry customers and rightly so.

Hopefully you agree and can see why we do not send them out pre-sealed, So once you have treated the frames in full and you then go on to notice ingress, all you need to do is either run some sealant along where the glass meets the exterior beading… or if you want you can remove the beading and silicone where the glass directly fits into the inner rebate instead.

Refitting the glass is the reverse of taking it out. If you wished to you could add a bead of silicone sealant although this is not necessary.

Sealant being used

Silicone being added with in the rebate

Movement in log cabins

Moving on slightly, Let’s think about how the frames actually fit into the walls of the cabin for a moment

Back to Movement again ( sorry ) The door and window frames are made with dry, fixing free U-channels which slot over the wall logs which means they will not constrict anything as it moves.

The U-channels are formed by what we call fascia boards… some call them architraves.. they’re basically just planks of wood screwed to the frame to create the U shape. These cover up the all important expansion and contraction gaps which are left above and to the sides of the frames ( please do not in-fill these gaps with anything )

Log cabin doors and window installation

Fascia boards fixed to the perimeter of the frame to create a U-Channel

 

So a few things we need to consider in terms of ongoing maintenance,

Have the inner sides of the fascias been treated correctly, fully? ..Well they should be as they also play a good part of sealing the outer perimeter of the frames.

Have you accidently sent fixings through these fascias which then also penetrate the moving wall logs underneath?.. if so please remove them as you will be preventing those logs from moving with the rest and you will most likely end up with gaps in between those logs.

Or, Perhaps you have noticed gaps around the door frame but are pretty adamant that there are no fouling fixings.. Try loosening the fascias and then re-tightening them.. if that doesn’t work then send us some pictures so we can have a look with you.

Maybe you have treated the underside of these fascias but you have noticed some signs of ingress? In this situation we may just need to enhance the seal between the two wooden surfaces.. Removing the fascias and adding silicone or draft excluders will normally cut that right out .. Just let us know and we are happy to send you some FOC.

Log cabin Extras

We can provide an array of Log Cabin Extras to complement your log cabin and their requirement depends mostly on the circumstance

Before we touched upon the importance of Ventilation which helps prevent moisture from building up within the sealed cabin, If you are not constantly in and out of your building should consider adding Air Vents to allow a continuous flow of air in and out of the building.

Also think about what you store within the cabin, White goods especially kick out a lot of moisture so be sure to install vents to combat that.

We also offer Storm kits as an extra, These are spring loaded metal rods which are used to ensure that the roof of the cabin remains tied down to the rest underneath, most applicable to those in very exposed areas or for those cabins with large exposed canopy/overhangs… please consider the application of a Storm kit

Shingle Glue is an option to consider, Very handy again for customers in exposed areas but generally if you are installing in the winter it is suggested to safeguard the shingles until you summer next rolls around.

We highly recommend Guttering for your log cabin, Not only will this help filter roof water to the desired location it will also serves in protecting the walls and perimeter further down from unwanted ingress and splash around the base.

We also sell a product which is very useful for coating the inside of the walls, Its called Impregnation Fluid on the website and is a very powerful Anti-rot, insecticidal treatment which you could consider, Please note that in inside of your doors and windows will need more than just this product alone.

The Roof

The roofs on these cabins should really be pretty self contained, so long as the roofing material was installed correctly there isn’t really that much you should ever need to think about.

Just keep an eye on any unwanted growth ontop, Moss can sometimes start to build up which should be removed as and when you can. Overgrowth can prevent the surface from ever drying out fully… also if you happen to install the cabin in the winter and moss manages to build up before the summer comes back around it could limit the amount of heat that gets to the tiles which is needed to bound all the those bitumen strips together.

An old log cabin shingled roof

Build up of moss

Serious overgrowth, Overdue a clear out we think

It will also be a good idea to periodically check underneath the roofs fascias for any nests which long term could start damaging the wood.

before those fascias are even applied they should be pre-treated as they are hard to reach once installed, Just like the other parts of the cabin you will need to revisit the treatment after a set timeframe and these higher parts are easily forgotten about and missed.

We hope this helps and we are happy to answer any unanswered queries that may come to mind, Please also revisit our installation manual for much much more.

Summary

  • Keep half a mind for your Base, Check the levels if you start to notice anything strange happening with the cabin on top
  • If you start to experience high levels of condensation within the building consider checking your damp proofing and joints between the foundation beams.
  • Remember that wood is a sponge, Keep on top of your treatment and please use something decent., Recoat those vulnerable areas and meet the guidelines set out on the tin.
  • Treat the doors and windows well and frequently
  • Fit hook and eyes to your doors to prevent unwanted wind damage
  • Keep your green fingers busy, Stop overgrowth from taking over and allow air to fully circulate around the cabin.
  • Do not create water traps around the walls of the cabin
  • Be mindful when fixing anything to the walls, Remembering your cabin likes to move
  • If you find water ingressing around the glass, they need sealing further
  • Guttering should always be fitted to better protect your cabin
  • Add Air Vents to prevent the build up of moisture
  • Consider the need for other log cabin extras
  • keep half an eye on your roof, remove overgrowth frequently

 

Adding a Window

Another Window?

Imagine you’ve built your log cabin and you find you need more light, or perhaps you already know you will need another window.

An additional large window has been added to the rear of this standard Rick 40mm Log cabin.

Or maybe you cannot block out that amazing scenery you have from your garden.

an extra window has been added to the rear wall of this Jutka, Gazebo, log cabin combination building.

If you do decide you would like another window Tuin do offer these, they’re a generic window of various sizes and can be fitted to any manufactures log cabin of thicknesses from 28mm up to 70mm:

When to Install an extra window

If you’ve already decided you would like an addtional window to that which comes as standard with your building you will probably order it at the same time as your building. You’ve then got to decide whether you are going to install it at the same time or afterwards, neither really matters, but my  preference is to always install it following the whole install. I like this way because:

  • You can be sure the main building has gone together correctly.
  • You will not void any guarantee.
  • You can be 100% certain of the positioning.
  • You avoid making mistakes in cutting logs.
  • You can be sure you are not going to structurally effect the log cabin.

Of course you can install it as you go but you run higher risks of a mess up, of which I have done in my early days fitting log cabins – namely cutting the logs wrong which does end in tears when there is no spare logs.

Generic Window Parts

There are several ways windows are made for log cabins and invariably they all follow the same pattern; they are a window frame with fascias applied to create a U section that the wall logs will sit in.

Remember it is important that the windows or doors are NOT fixed to the logs in any way to allow for expansion and contraction.

Below is an old Generic window I found in the workshop which I’ll use as a demonstration on how I fit the window.

Various parts that make up the generic window.

These windows are made up three components:

  • Window Frame.
  • Spacer Pieces according the width of wall log.
  • Window facias.

If we look at the spacers / battens you will see there is a paper label showing you the measurements for various log thicknesses.

Spacers which are marked and will be cut down to match the log thickness you have in your building.

Of course if the paper is not there, lost or got wet or even if your log thickness is not shown then you can easily measure this. If you are cutting to your own size it is best to make is 2 – 3mm larger. For instance; a 40mm thick wall log would have a spacer measurement of 42 – 43mm in width.

It might help to layout the parts so you can see exactly what you have.

Parts of the window. You should have two top, four side and two bottom fascias. As well as the spacers or adjustable battens whichever term you prefer.

Fitting the Generic Window

Before you start, trim down the spacers to match the thickness of your log cabin either by using the mark guide or measuring yourself. We are going to fit this window into a 58mm log cabin at our show site.

58mm thick wall log.

Start by marking the spacer for your size of wall log

Cut the spacer down using a handsaw or if you have it use a circular saw or jigsaw.

Once you have your spacers to size you can then fix them to the window frame.

Spacers have been fitted on each of the wides of the window frame.

You will of course need four spacers that go on each side of the window frame. You can fix these however you would like to, some fitters will use nails but personally I like to use screws as I think it gives a better fit, it’s easier to take apart and is generally stronger. The choice of fixing is yours at this point.

I prefer to use screws to fit the spacers but it is up to you at this point.

Cutting a hole in your Log Cabin

This next bit can be a bit tense and I must admit it still makes me a bit nervous in case I mess it up.

Before we start measuring or cutting holes we need to find the best place for our window. There’s a couple of rules to follow:

  • Do not cut any closer than 200mm to the interlocking corner of the cabin.
  • Do not cut any closer than 200mm to the side of another window.
  • Ideally start or finish your cut on a full log.
  • Ideally leave at least two clear logs above the window to maintane integrity of the building.
  • Make your own judgement of the integrity of the building once the hole is cut, if you need advice for a tricky placement please contact the main office or leave a message on this page and we’ll be pleased to help.

You can measure the window and transcribe those measurement onto the walls which is what I think a lot of people do. You would start at the centre point and measure out either side both top and bottom and then mark the lines.

Personally I still don’t trust myself or a tape measure and hold the actual window frame (including attached spacers) to the wall and mark around it with a pencil / pen. That way I can be sure my eyes haven’t gone wonky or the tape measure has stretched or shrunk.

Either mark out where you are going to cut the window by taking measurements from the window frame or hold the actual window to the wall and draw around it.

One marked you need to consider what happens when your log cabin either expands or contract which it will do over the cycle of the seasons. For more details on this please see: Expansion and Contraction in Log Cabins.

As you will know it is necessary to leave an expansion, or, contraction gap above the window to cope with seasonal variations. The gap you make will be decided by the time of year you are installing:

  • Height of Summer: The wood will be at its smallest as a lot of moisture will have escaped. Therefore only a small gap of 10 – 15mm maybe necessary as the building is only likely to expand more as Autumn and Winter arrive.
  • Depths of Winter: The wood will be at its largest size as it will have absorbed a lot of moisture from the surrounding air. Therefore a gap of 20 – 30mm maybe necessary as the building is only likely to contract as the Spring and Summer arrive.

As the logs expand marginally length ways you only really need a gap of around 5 – 10mm either side, again depending on the time of year you are installing.

I prefer to be on the right side of caution and will perhaps make the expansion gap slightly smaller. I will then advise the customer to check behind the fascias as the season changes over the first year to make sure a gap is still present of at least 5mm in the depth of winter. If it is not it is easy to remove the window and take out a little more to allow for the gap.

Making our marks to allow for expansion and contraction of the logs around the window frame.

Once you made your marks, double and triple checked then we can cut the wall logs. A circular saw make sit easy work but you can of course use a hand saw.

Cutting the hole is easier with a circular saw but you can also use a jigsaw or a hand saw.

A complete window hole cut. Do not worry if you are not 100% straight in your cut as any slight deviations will be hidden behind the fascia.

You can offer up the window to check for fitment.

Final Fitting of the Generic Window

You can now fit the fascias on the outside of the window, again, like the spacers you can either screw or nail them onto the frame. I personally think screws are far better but it is up to you.

Fit the fascia to the outside of the window frame onto the spacers.

When you are working with wood it is always highly advisable to pilot hole anything you are going to be screwing or nailing.

Always use a pilot hole when screwing or nailing one piece of wood to another.

Once all four of the outside fascia has been fitted you can then place the window into the hole. In the next picture we have done this from the outside. Notice one single screw used in the centre of the top fascia, this is to loosely secure the window so it can be completed from the inside single handedly. It is of course better if you have someone holding it for you.

Note the screw will be removed once the window is installed.

Complete window fitted from the outside of the log cabin, loosely held in place by one screw at the top to make it easier to fit. The screw is of course later removed.

The fascias are fitted to the inside and the ‘helping screw’ outside is removed and the window is complete.

There we have the completed window!

A Few Window Notes:

Fitting a window is not too hard at all, just consider you expansion and contraction gaps, also the old saying of ‘measure twice cut once’ is very relevant.

Over the first year as the seasons change, periodically check your gap above the window, you can easily remove the top fascia to check behind it.

If security is a concern you can:

  • Countersink your screws and use wood filler mixed with sawdust to hide your screws on the outside fascia.
  • You can use Philips head screws and once installed drill the head so it can no longer be used.
  • Use security screws.

Blackpool Log Cabin Feature

On the Blackpool Log Cabin product page, we show you plenty of images of our customer’s Log Cabin to show you what you can do with them. As well as all the fine details on the dimensions, technical tips as well as our quality checks for each Log Cabin.

But, understandably, that just doesn’t do the Log Cabin enough justice. That’s why on this page we’ve collected as many pictures, videos and detailed reviews as we can to create this customer feature page, so here goes:

Blackpool Log Cabin

The Blackpool Log Cabin , 58mm thick wood and double glazed windows and doors.

Made from 58mm slow grown Spruce timber, the Blackpool Log Cabin comes at a size of 4.4m x 3.4m. A perfect size for additional living areas, a home gym, home pub- even a garden office! Get plenty of natural light inside this Log Cabin with its full frontal double glazed doors and side windows. A durable building with its cost balancing out with future heating costs (especially if you add insulation!).

Reviews:

You dont have to just take our word, here are some excerpts from our many Blackpool Log Cabin Reviews – averaging out to five star ratings:

“The cabin itself is light and spacious, the window can be swapped on either side (the middle window pops off to make lifting it easier!). All the materials are really good quality and sturdy and the build itself was rather straightforward, with 3 of us on it, it took about 4 hours to get to the point of putting roof boards on!” – Mr A Bentham

“For the money, the Blackpool Cabin seems unbeatable, especially with free roof shingles – 58mm logs, spruce (superior to the ubiquitous pine), double glazed, metal door trim, higher end windows. The floor is not included which prompted me to use the slab as a floor, as suggested on the web site. Great suggestion which had not occurred to me.” – Mrs Y Clarke

“The Blackpool cabin is exceptionally high quality, finished to a really high standard and fitted together very quickly. I would recommend this cabin to anyone and am very happy with it for the price I paid. I had a few issues with the cabin whilst building it, but contacted Tuin who quickly responded and sorted the problems out without any fuss. i would recommend using them for both their quality of building materials and their response to help out with any issues i had.” – Mr Wagstaff

Among these reviews, we also received a detailed review from a customer who showed us with the use of images and narration their experience installing the Blackpool Log Cabin:

Installation: 

So long as you keep organised and follow suit of the information given on the Essential Installation Manual, as well as plenty of other Log Cabin Fitting Tips that are posted throughout the blog- written by our one and only, Richard.

Here are some of our favourite sets of installation images sent in by a customer:

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Installed: 

When installed, there are endless ways in which you can treat/paint your Blackpool log cabin, here are some of our favourite examples:

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Customer Pictures:

If you would like to see more photo’s from customers please click on the picture below – Note: This will take you to our customers photo gallery hosted by Google Photos. Pictures may show older models or customer own modifications.

Blackpool log cabin customer gallery

We asked a Tuin team member, Elizabeth, about what her favourite features of the Blackpool are- and why the UK market would love it too:

“I like the Blackpool Log Cabin for the amount of natural light that can come in through the front facing doors and additional windows on the size. They’re all double glazed so that along with the 58mm log thickness, I believe the Blackpool will store heat well. Because of the heat capacity and the amount of natural light coming in- I can see why a lot of our customers use them as garden offices” 

I was thinking the same, the cost of the cabin will balance out on heating costs over the years- but we recommend insulation in the roof and floor to make sure it really stays nice and cosy in the colder months!

Blackpool Log Cabin

The Blackpool Log Cabin , 58mm thick wood and double glazed windows and doors.

For more details such as precise measurements, pricing and a list of what will be included within the self build kit, please see the Blackpool Log Cabin product page.

If the Blackpool isn’t quite for you, why not take a look at the Aiste Log Cabin Showcase, or if you desire the 58mm log thickness- then the Stian Log Cabin might be more suitable.

Lennart Log Cabin Show Site Build

Hello everyone,

So as you may or may not know, I (Megan), haven’t been a member of Tuin for very long- which means that my knowledge of Log Cabins and installing them are limited to the posts I’ve read made by Richard.

He often mentions about how easy it is to install a log cabin but honestly, I thought it was mostly him talking from experience so when I was asked to capture the new show site buildings being installed- I decided to take this opportunity to learn as much as I could to improve my blogs and hopefully show you how I have evolved from a DIY newbie to a little less of a newbie. I’m considering of making this a series of all the new show site buildings that will be installed in the upcoming months, maybe we should call it ‘Megan learns some things’ or ‘From DIY newbie to not so newbie’. Obviously those titles are very bad, maybe you could leave a comment for your ideas below.

And also I must disclose, I am not a physical/manual labour type of girl. So my report on this will be through watching the installs, not partaking in them.

So, to get things started… 

The first new Log Cabin on the Show Site will be an updated Lennart Log Cabin to replace the previous one, we’ve even managed to persuade one of our apprentice sales assistants Andrew to join in with the installation, as this will be a great learning experience for him too.

Now, Andrew and I are very similar.. Both at the age of 18 with little DIY experience and always on a keyboard, we were definitely are out of our comfort zone.. Wish us luck!

Lennart Installation Plans

Now Andrew started off confident with this project, with the help of our two experienced servicemen we were confident that the Lennart will be installed by the end of the day! With the base already been made from the previous Lennart, it started off smoothly with Andrew going around in a square to fit in the wall logs.

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With only minor mistakes (such as almost putting in one of the incorrect logs at the front of the building till he soon figured afterwards why I was giggling on the sideline) he was doing well! Maybe he would of been better and avoided this by frequently referring to the Log Cabin plans. Though unfortunately our experienced men found this progress rather slow, so they soon started to help and the walls were quickly heightening.

Incorrect Log Example

If you looked at the log and looked at the plans.. That wouldn’t of happened..

As they reached seven logs (I believe) high, they installed the ‘half log’ for the window. Which turned out to be as simple as sliding the window into the grooves of the half log, when doing this I recommend to add a few of the smaller logs on either side of the designated gap to ensure that the window slid in straight, see below:

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Around about this time, Andrew began to structure the doorframe. Please note: That this actually was done the wrong way round (again, might of been avoided with the assistance of the Cabin plans..). Hopefully what I captured should explain what happened and how we resolved it, also take note of the captions of the images for more detail:

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With the doorframe in and a coffee consumed, it didn’t take long at all for the three guys to finish installing the walls of the Log Cabin, then straight onto the Apex. Now, admittedly I thought apex referred to a different material type, but it seems to be the triangular shape (in this case) that connects and supports the wall logs to the roof logs/purlins. Also, I have just been informed that I was likely getting it mixed up with perspex!

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As you can see above, the ‘slanted slots’ (as I call them) are cut out for the purlins on both sides, so all you will have to do is simply slide the purlins into both ended slots. We prefer to screw down the purlins into the apex for more security, it’s not strictly required.

Now… This is where things got repetitive (and slightly boring to watch). The guys then took the first roof board (for the overhang), ensured it was level and used the clout nails to secure the roof board at the top, middle and bottom of the board. Lining up to be nailed on the center purling, the middle/support purling and the cabin wall.

Lennart Overhang Roof Boards

Our roof boards are also made with interlocking timer, so its a fairly simple process to side the next roofboard in place, make sure its align with the previous one and nail it down. The interlocking process kind of reminds me of how you would install laminate flooring. Then you go onto the next one.. Than the next one.. Etc.

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For the last roof board there was a slight overhang, so to make it look neater we marked where the roof boards should finish and cut it to size using a circular saw.

Last Roof Board Adjustments

Then, you guessed it, you repeat with the other side! Admittedly, I left to continue to work in my warm office by the time this was happening. When I returned all of the roof boards were laid down and nailed- hurrah! We also added an edge/trim to the Lennart ready for the guttering to be installed fully leveled, this will happen after the cabin is treated.

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To finish off the body of the Log Cabin, Philip showed me how you would install doors for your Log Cabin. It seems to be a simple process of aligning the middle circular hinge in between the two already on the doorframe and pushing the provided pin in place. During this we had also noted that the door hinges appeared to look rusty, we apologise if this has happened to you. If you notice this on your Log Cabin Doors then please email us with pictures for reference, and our service team will send some new hinges for you to replace.

Double Door Installation

Then, came the monotonous part.. The one everyone tends to get bored of doing.. Fitting roof shingles. The shingles we used for the Lennart Log Cabin was our Red Hexagonal Shingles.  The process was long and I honestly spent most of it in the office, by the time I came downstairs to take this picture below, all enthusiasm and motivation from Andrew’s eyes were fading. He was tired, legs hurt (maybe after a few more show cabins he’ll be used to manual labour..) and was tired of lining up shingles. But it was all worth it in my opinion, by the end of the office day the Lennart was installed! And it looks stunning, amazing job guys!

Red Hexagonal Shingles

Over the next few days the Lennart Log Cabin will be coated with our Clear Carefree Protectant Treatment.

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I hope you enjoyed my view from this article on our new Lennart Log Cabin show building, and a big round of applause for Andrew who helped Wayne and Philip install this beautiful cabin. Let us know if you enjoyed this and wish to see more with our other future show site installs!

After watching this process, it really does seem that Richard wasnt oversimplifying the process- If you read and keep looking at the plans provided and read all of our pages for Fitting Log Cabins, it seems rather easy! Though it may get more complicated as the larger show buildings start to be installed.. And maybe if you yourself are carrying the logs and installing them.. I’ll keep you guys updated!

Again, I believe the process will be easier once you have read our Fitting Advice Pages.

You will also find more specific articles that may help when you look at the ‘Important Information’ tab on our Log Cabin pages.

There are also a few more showsite installation posts, like another one of mine with the Kennet Log Cabin as well as one written by our sales assistant in training, Becky helping with the Daisy Log Cabin and 28mm Storage Annexe!

If you enjoyed this post, you may like our other installation reviews sent in from our customers at: Pictorial Customer Reviews.

Derby Log Cabin Review and Build

Mr F has written a very good article on his experience with us and his building – The Derby 58mm log cabin with some great pictures.

I’m always very interested to hear customers journey and thoroughly appreciate his story, it gives us a lot of insight into our service and product and is very much enjoyed by me and other customers considering a similar journey and project.

There was a few surprises for Mr F, a couple of problems to overcome such is normal when building any substantial structure, we also missed a couple of parts and made some mistakes but it’s a good story to read and one we can learn from ……

Mr F wrote the below and sent in loads of pictures of his journey, I have copied the pictures below his article with some annotation and notes.


We took a long time in deciding which cabin to buy and who to buy it from. Fortunately I came across the website of TUIN and got very interested in reading reviews from clients and Richard’s blog etc. Finally we decided on which cabin to have, placed the order and arranged a delivery date.

I contacted Richard for the sizes of the packages and then started to get concerned as Richard informed me that it would arrive in one package – 6000mm x 1150mm x 650mm +-1600kg and would probably be on a large lorry with a forklift.

The driver contacted me on the day of delivery, apologising that he would be with us late evening if that was OK with us or would we prefer the following day.  We agreed to take delivery asap and as we live in a close, off of a country road, I met him on a nearby main road and took him back to our bungalow by car.  He checked as to whether he could get the lorry up our close and wanted to give it a go.  Very clever maneuvering got him close to our drive.  He offloaded his forklift (very nice piece of kit) and much to my wifes surprise picked up this 6000mm long package, turned the wheels on the forklift and proceed down our drive – It was a side loader, that is what she didn’t expect.

He offloaded the package, had a cup of tea and proceded on his way with our thanks.

Next morning my stepson and I opened this huge package and started moving all the parts to our back garden placing the parts in the vicinity of where the cabin was to be erected.

It is quite daunting when you see all the parts spread out.  However once you start to erect the cabin it goes up fairly quickly.  We did have a problem with a warped board but after checking the website carried on as instructed.  I would agree with a previous reviewer of this product hanging the doors took us a couple of hours before we were happy with the way they closed.  Not difficult, just had to  learn how much to adjust the hinges, before re-hanging the doors each time.

I was not sure how to fit the window as some of the parts were not marked and I could not be sure how it fitted following the diagram.  A quick email to Richard and the problem was solved.  Up onto the roof to finish the planking and then the shingles, they are great.  I have never used them before and I think you will agree they look very professional.

Fitting the barge boards on the gable ends was a problem because we did not have the right timber supplied. Phone call to Karen and replacement timber was arranged for delivery the following day. That’s what I call service. It was impressed on me from the start by the team at Tuin that whatever the problem contact Tuin and they will do their very best to sort it out, and they did.

Now, how to treat the timber. We decided to use Sadolin, not cheap but we want this cabin to last. Seems like a good product, certainly seemed substantial when applying it. Painted inside and out.

Fitted guttering and connected to a large water butt.  As suggested by Richard I dug a small trench around the cabin and filled it with gravel, this mainly to stop the splashes when it rains.  I did not dig the trench quite wide enough, will widen it at a later date.  However, I then used some UPVC barge board (which had a lip) to cover the edge of the base around the cabin and this went down into the gravel.  I then sealed this all the way around the cabin with silicon.  So far it seems to have worked and keeps quite clean.

Next was electrics, dug a trench from the cabin to the back of the bungalow and buried armoured cable, with warning tape half way down the trench (as per instructions from my electrician).  Purchased a couple of LED ceiling lights and arranged for the electrician to connect up the supply and install sockets etc with the strict instructions that he was not to nail/screw anything inside the cabin that would hinder expansion of the timbers.  Yes Richard I am glad I read your blog on what to do and what not to do, very informative.

The floor was next. I used timber joists laid on waterproof membrane, not fixed to the floor or to the cabin. In-filled the joists with fibre glass and topped it with exterior board. Finally my wife chose a laminate floor covering which I then laid. Before I could blink she was moving in, I did not have time to hide the key! Joking aside we are both looking forward to using this cabin as our studio and hobby room. Curtains are up at the window and blinds have been bought for the doors and side panels and I have got to make a pelmet for the window to match the gable end scalloped fascia.

We both are extremely happy with this product. The team at Tuin could not have been more helpful in making it a very nice experience for a couple of oldies and of course not forgetting a stepson for his help.

Sincere best wishes for continued success in your business.

The site of Mr F's Derby Log cabin

The site of Mr F’s Derby Log cabin

Lots of parts, all laid out correctly, it is important to keep the logs on top of each other while the build commences.

Lots of parts, all laid out correctly. It is important to keep the logs on top of each other while the build commences.

The base ready to take the Derby Log cabin. It is pleasing to see this is to the footprint of the building.

The base ready to take the Derby Log cabin. It is pleasing to see this is to the footprint of the building.

The first log layer going down on top of the foundation beams.

The first log layer going down on top of the foundation beams.

Mr F and his 'Installation Team'.

Mr F and his ‘Installation Team’.

The Derby log cabin is starting to grow.

The Derby log cabin is starting to grow.

Mr F came across a warped board. This can sometimes happen as wood moves when unsupported, seldom is this a problem though and can very easily be overcome.

Mr F came across a warped board. This can sometimes happen as wood moves when unsupported, seldom is this a problem though and can very easily be overcome.

It's always important to check that the base logs remain square throughout the build. If the bottom logs are square the top ones will follow.

It’s always important to check that the base logs remain square throughout the build. If the bottom logs are square the top ones will follow.

Three sides going up on the Derby log cabin.

Three sides going up on the Derby log cabin.

Window and door opening in the Derby log cabin

Window and door opening in the Derby log cabin

11-window-space

Gables have been put up. This is generally the most hardest part of the install. Gables are very heavy and unstable at this point.

Gables have been put up. This is generally the most hardest part of the install. Gables are very heavy and unstable at this point.

Once the purlins are in the roof then becomes stable and roof boards can be nailed on.

Once the purlins are in the roof then becomes stable and roof boards can be nailed on.

Roof boards are now being fixed to the purlins. Two nails on each board across each fixing point.

Roof boards are now being fixed to the purlins. Two nails on each board across each fixing point.

Checking the log cabin is vertical.

Checking the log cabin is vertical.

Doors have been fitted. This always takes a little adjustment to get 100% correct.

Doors have been fitted. This always takes a little adjustment to get 100% correct.

All the roof boards on the log cabin have been nailed on correctly.

All the roof boards on the log cabin have been nailed on correctly.

Adding a leading edge support. Carpenter clamps are an essential tool to use in the installation of a log cabin.

Adding a leading edge support. Carpenter clamps are an essential tool to use in the installation of a log cabin.

Felt shingles are being fitted. Shingles are FAR better than roofing felt and highly recommended.

Felt shingles are being fitted. Shingles are FAR better than roofing felt and highly recommended.

Perfect spacing and care taken over the shingle install will ensure it looks amazing, lasts years and you do not run out from those supplied.

Perfect spacing and care taken over the shingle install will ensure it looks amazing, lasts years and you do not run out from those supplied.

I'm pleased to see a damp proof membrane on top of the base, this saves damp coming up. Mr F is then using rockwool or similar to insulate the floor. I recommend every cabin has a floor insulated as a lot of heat is lost through here.

I’m pleased to see a damp proof membrane on top of the base, this saves damp coming up. Mr F is then using rockwool or similar to insulate the floor. I recommend every cabin has a floor insulated as a lot of heat is lost through here.

you do not need to order our T&G spruce floor if you are using an alternative floor covering.

You do not need to order our T&G spruce floor if you are using an alternative floor covering.

Mr F read my recommendations regarding electrics in log cabins and is installing as such.

Mr F read my recommendations regarding electrics in log cabins and is installing as such.

The finished Derby 58mm log cabin, the front step entrance built by Mr F.

The finished Derby 58mm log cabin, the front step entrance built by Mr F.

Guttering added by Mr F. We also offer guttering kits but this looks a great install as well. Guttering is important to use with your log cabin, whether from us or other suppliers - it is often overlooked but like your house it does make a difference to longevity.

Guttering added by Mr F. We also offer guttering kits but this looks a great install as well. Guttering is important to use with your log cabin, whether from us or other suppliers – it is often overlooked but like your house it does make a difference to longevity.

Mrs F moved into the Derby log cabin before he did!

Mrs F moved into the Derby log cabin before he did!

The final finished log cabin with Mr F's flourishes of design including the bargeboards which really set the log cabin off.

The final finished log cabin with Mr F’s flourishes of design including the bargeboards which really set the log cabin off.

Thank you Mr F, I thoroughly enjoyed your article and story. It is much appreciated and also helps other people undertaking a similar project. I hope you have enjoyed the present we sent. If you require any other of our products in the future please let me know personally and I can arrange a further discount for you.

Other customer experiences, builds and ideas can be enjoyed here: Pictorial Tuin Reviews

Log Cabin Export – Islonia

I took a road trip for our family holiday this year – a road trip to Scotland taking a slow week to get there, and a quicker route to get back. There were ulterior motives though! Perhaps, rather sadly, they were Log Cabin and customer related (even on holiday!).

We have been dealing with a lovely customer periodically over the last few years;

Mr McWhinney has been a customer since 2013 and he has ordered four log cabins from us over this time. Jos who looks after sales and is also my wife was fascinated with his stories and where the log cabins were and what they were being used for during her conversations with him, and had built up quite a rapport.

Jos suggested this should be at least one of the places we visit whilst in Scotland – Jos is as daft as I am when it comes to our buildings and what finally happens to them after we have delivered them – we have the big build up, the delivery and then rarely hear anything again so it’s always nice to see what happens to them and the ongoing story of their life and the people behind them.

Unbeknown to Jos or I we were actually visiting Royalty and another country and had been exporting our log cabins all this time without knowing it and not even declared it to the VAT man or listed it on the monthly INTRASTAT return!

Our destination was Dry Island in Badachro, Scotland.

Dry Island in Badachro

Dry Island in Badachro, Gairloch

The story developed once we were there and discovered that in 2010 Dry Island was declared a Micronation and was now named Islonia, with Mr McWhinney and his wife the King and Queen of the nation!

Jos had been primarily fascinated with the Shellfish safaris that were run from the Island and she quickly booked this up when we arrived at our cottage in Badachro and after visiting our first Islonian log cabin known as the ‘Islonia Embassy’.

Lennart 58mm log cabin

The Islonia Embassy on the quay using one of our 58mm Lennart log cabins

Lennart 58mm log cabin

Lennart 58mm log cabin

The Lennart Log Cabin is ideally suited as an ’embassy’ and somewhere for Islonia customers to book up their Shellfish Safari, strong and sturdy at 58mm and double glazed, it does make a rather splendid embassy!

I always like to check installations of log cabins when I see them just in case and although this one is perfect, I would prefer to see a storm kit applied to it. It is rather exposed on the quay side and although fixed down to the base, the canopy at the front is rather large, so I will be sending out one for the Embassy.

Opposite the Islonia embassy was another cabin that looked suspiciously like one of our Clockhouse Log Cabin, it is the identical building but I didn’t get to speak to the owners to be sure.

Clockhouse log cabin in 45mm and double glazed

Clockhouse log cabin in 45mm and double glazed

Having booked our trip, we headed for the island across the incredible floating bridge – known as the ‘bridge over the Atlantic’.

Bridge to Islonia - Dry Island at high tide

Bridge to Islonia – Dry Island at high tide

Bridge to the Island at low tide

Bridge to the Island at low tide

After the bridge we were met with our second log cabin:

The Islonia boarder

The Islonia border

Peter 34mm log cabin being used for passport control, border duties and occasional snacks

Peter 34mm log cabin being used for passport control, border duties and occasional snacks sold by the Islonia residents (two small children generally)

We boarded the Zephyr, one of Mr McWhinnie’ boats;

The view from Islonia quay with the Zephyr the bottom right hand corner.

The view from Islonia quay with the Zephyr the bottom right hand corner.

Mr McWhinnie explained a great deal about Creel fishing, the history and area.

Mr McWhinnie explained a great deal about Creel fishing, the history and the area and allowed us to handle many a creature, my children were fascinated as was Jos and I.

Langoustine caught in the traditional manner and exported across the world in 24 hours.

Langoustine caught in the traditional manner and exported across the world in 24 hours.

I highly recommend this tour if you are in the area, links to this are above. Mr McWhinnie was very welcoming and invited us to see the other two log cabins he had from us, one was being used for ‘Glamping’ (we had tried to book this for ourselves but was fully booked all year so get in early!)

Coventry 58mm log cabin, double glazed and being used for glamping on the Islonia Island.

Coventry 58mm log cabin, double glazed and being used for glamping on the Islonia Island.

Coventry 58mm log cabin, perfect for a glamping project.

Coventry 58mm log cabin, perfect for a glamping location.

Coventry log cabin kitchen area is in the annexe to the side.

Coventry log cabin kitchen area is in the annexe to the side.

For ablutions ... the Turdis was to the side.

For ablutions … the Turdis was to the side.

Fully kitted out inside for a family of four to enjoy their glamping on their own private island.

Fully kitted out inside for a family of four to enjoy their glamping on their own private island.

Looking the other side of the coventry log cabin was a set of bunkbeds for the children.

Looking the other side of the Coventry Log Cabin was a set of bunkbeds for the children.

The ‘Bothy’ as it was referred to (Bothies are to be found in remote, mountainous areas of Scotland, Northern England, Ireland and Wales.) was well hidden on the island, a gorgeous, hidden retreat and one I will stay in one day.

Hidden in the woods was the Bothy.

Hidden in the woods was the Bothy.

Perhaps more was hidden in those woods than we knew about

Perhaps more was hidden in those woods than we knew about

Mr McWhinnie and I

The ‘Bothy’ in Islonia, our third log cabin exported to the micronation.

Our fourth and last log cabin was a little harder to see, we approached it from the water in a small boat.

A smaller boat for a trip to see the fourth cabin and the pub!

A smaller boat (bottom right) for a trip to see the fourth cabin and the pub across the Loch!

A past, long forgotten civilisation?

As we approached the other small island ….. A past, long forgotten, civilisation?

A tad cheeky!

We approached further ….. A tad cheeky!

OUr fourth log cabin export, the lovely Idonea

Our fourth log cabin export, the lovely Idonea. The Idonea was built mainly by the children on the island, it still needs finishing with the roof shingles and treatment but it was lovely to see her being enjoyed as a hideaway somewhere so remote.

This is my personal blog but I cannot bore you more with pictures of my holiday, suffice to say Mr McWhinnie’s and Islonia is a lovely place to visit – if you are in the area please pop in or better still enjoy our cabin and the Islonia Experience

I had tried to visit other customers in Scotland while I was there but never want to intrude, I visited the Isle of Skye and saw our cabin at the Skye Shepherd Huts, I would have loved to see our log cabin at the Croft which I find an amazing project and would love to see one day, perhaps next year when I will be going back …..

Mr McWhinnie and I agreed one of our shepherd huts would be great for Glamping on the islands ….

Shepherd hut is an ideal building for glamping on the islands or surrounding area.

Shepherd hut is an ideal building for glamping on the islands or surrounding area. This one is mine with my very loved Hebridean sheep enjoying living under it.

Hebridean Sheep

Genuine Hebridean Sheep on the Isle of Skye – they need a hut too!

We also agreed other plans for a year or two ahead with the supply of an Edelweiss as a bigger project for glamping and holiday lets in the area and I look forward to exporting an Edelweiss to the Island or surrounding areas:

Edelweiss log cabin in 70mm.

Edelweiss log cabin in 70mm.

Before I leave this post, Badachro showed up two other interesting things;

One …. the timber frame base used on the Coventry log cabin but a better one locally which was amazing …….

Timber frame base used for the Coventry log cabin.

Timber frame base used for the Coventry log cabin.

Amazing timber frame base.

Amazing timber frame base on a timber building.

And lastly …… our Log Cabin Roof Shingles being used on several houses locally …… these are amazing shingles and often we offer free shingles with log cabins.

IKO roof shingles used on one of the houses locally.

IKO roof shingles used on one of the houses locally.

We rarely hear from customers once we have delivered the product, we love to hear the stories and adventures and to follow up with a story of what happens next and maybe even visit. If you would like to feature in my blog please let me know.

Log Cabin Skylight – Roof Vent

We’ve been looking at this for a while. We get asked a lot of times for windows in the roof or can you fit something like a Velux window in the roof of your Log Cabin.

The answer is yes you can. But to fit a velux requires a lot of modification, a lot of strengthening and a bit of mucking about. They can be fitted but it’s not a fun job.

This is a cracking new product we have added, it seems to tick all the boxes, it’s easy to fit, light enough to not worry about extra strength and provides a good lot of light into your log cabin.

Showing the before and after, it's quite a difference.

Showing the before and after, it’s quite a difference.

You can see there is a huge difference. The skylight is easy to fit on a fresh install but you do need to base it around a felt backing, the surface that the oil based compression gasket seals onto needs to be relatively smooth, standard shed felt or EPDM or Easy roof membrane is ideal. If you have a shingle roof you will need to have an area of felt only.

Using felt shingles but you will need an area of Felt or Easy roof membrane to help it to seal.

Using felt shingles but you will need an area of Felt or Easy roof membrane to help it to seal.

Installation of the skylight / roof vent is very straightforward and you do not even need to be on the roof. Installation as a retrofit is a little trickier and I will be doing this over the next week or so and posting on this on the way I think it is best done.

As well as a normal roof you can also install this on an insulated roof, it may though be necessary to add additional trim around the rim of the unit.

Installed with an insulated roof. Longer bolts may need to be sourced locally and also trim for the inside.

Installed with an insulated roof. Longer bolts may need to be sourced locally and also trim for the inside.

If you are interested in this product please see more details here skylight / roof vent for log cabins

Some interesting pictures of a recent customers install of their roof vents in an insulated roof log cabin: