Adding a Window

Another Window?

Imagine you’ve built your log cabin and you find you need more light, or perhaps you already know you will need another window.

An additional large window has been added to the rear of this standard Rick 40mm Log cabin.

Or maybe you cannot block out that amazing scenery you have from your garden.

an extra window has been added to the rear wall of this Jutka, Gazebo, log cabin combination building.

If you do decide you would like another window Tuin do offer these, they’re a generic window of various sizes and can be fitted to any manufactures log cabin of thicknesses from 28mm up to 70mm:

When to Install an extra window

If you’ve already decided you would like an addtional window to that which comes as standard with your building you will probably order it at the same time as your building. You’ve then got to decide whether you are going to install it at the same time or afterwards, neither really matters, but my  preference is to always install it following the whole install. I like this way because:

  • You can be sure the main building has gone together correctly.
  • You will not void any guarantee.
  • You can be 100% certain of the positioning.
  • You avoid making mistakes in cutting logs.
  • You can be sure you are not going to structurally effect the log cabin.

Of course you can install it as you go but you run higher risks of a mess up, of which I have done in my early days fitting log cabins – namely cutting the logs wrong which does end in tears when there is no spare logs.

Generic Window Parts

There are several ways windows are made for log cabins and invariably they all follow the same pattern; they are a window frame with fascias applied to create a U section that the wall logs will sit in.

Remember it is important that the windows or doors are NOT fixed to the logs in any way to allow for expansion and contraction.

Below is an old Generic window I found in the workshop which I’ll use as a demonstration on how I fit the window.

Various parts that make up the generic window.

These windows are made up three components:

  • Window Frame.
  • Spacer Pieces according the width of wall log.
  • Window facias.

If we look at the spacers / battens you will see there is a paper label showing you the measurements for various log thicknesses.

Spacers which are marked and will be cut down to match the log thickness you have in your building.

Of course if the paper is not there, lost or got wet or even if your log thickness is not shown then you can easily measure this. If you are cutting to your own size it is best to make is 2 – 3mm larger. For instance; a 40mm thick wall log would have a spacer measurement of 42 – 43mm in width.

It might help to layout the parts so you can see exactly what you have.

Parts of the window. You should have two top, four side and two bottom fascias. As well as the spacers or adjustable battens whichever term you prefer.

Fitting the Generic Window

Before you start, trim down the spacers to match the thickness of your log cabin either by using the mark guide or measuring yourself. We are going to fit this window into a 58mm log cabin at our show site.

58mm thick wall log.

Start by marking the spacer for your size of wall log

Cut the spacer down using a handsaw or if you have it use a circular saw or jigsaw.

Once you have your spacers to size you can then fix them to the window frame.

Spacers have been fitted on each of the wides of the window frame.

You will of course need four spacers that go on each side of the window frame. You can fix these however you would like to, some fitters will use nails but personally I like to use screws as I think it gives a better fit, it’s easier to take apart and is generally stronger. The choice of fixing is yours at this point.

I prefer to use screws to fit the spacers but it is up to you at this point.

Cutting a hole in your Log Cabin

This next bit can be a bit tense and I must admit it still makes me a bit nervous in case I mess it up.

Before we start measuring or cutting holes we need to find the best place for our window. There’s a couple of rules to follow:

  • Do not cut any closer than 200mm to the interlocking corner of the cabin.
  • Do not cut any closer than 200mm to the side of another window.
  • Ideally start or finish your cut on a full log.
  • Ideally leave at least two clear logs above the window to maintane integrity of the building.
  • Make your own judgement of the integrity of the building once the hole is cut, if you need advice for a tricky placement please contact the main office or leave a message on this page and we’ll be pleased to help.

You can measure the window and transcribe those measurement onto the walls which is what I think a lot of people do. You would start at the centre point and measure out either side both top and bottom and then mark the lines.

Personally I still don’t trust myself or a tape measure and hold the actual window frame (including attached spacers) to the wall and mark around it with a pencil / pen. That way I can be sure my eyes haven’t gone wonky or the tape measure has stretched or shrunk.

Either mark out where you are going to cut the window by taking measurements from the window frame or hold the actual window to the wall and draw around it.

One marked you need to consider what happens when your log cabin either expands or contract which it will do over the cycle of the seasons. For more details on this please see: Expansion and Contraction in Log Cabins.

As you will know it is necessary to leave an expansion, or, contraction gap above the window to cope with seasonal variations. The gap you make will be decided by the time of year you are installing:

  • Height of Summer: The wood will be at its smallest as a lot of moisture will have escaped. Therefore only a small gap of 10 – 15mm maybe necessary as the building is only likely to expand more as Autumn and Winter arrive.
  • Depths of Winter: The wood will be at its largest size as it will have absorbed a lot of moisture from the surrounding air. Therefore a gap of 20 – 30mm maybe necessary as the building is only likely to contract as the Spring and Summer arrive.

As the logs expand marginally length ways you only really need a gap of around 5 – 10mm either side, again depending on the time of year you are installing.

I prefer to be on the right side of caution and will perhaps make the expansion gap slightly smaller. I will then advise the customer to check behind the fascias as the season changes over the first year to make sure a gap is still present of at least 5mm in the depth of winter. If it is not it is easy to remove the window and take out a little more to allow for the gap.

Making our marks to allow for expansion and contraction of the logs around the window frame.

Once you made your marks, double and triple checked then we can cut the wall logs. A circular saw make sit easy work but you can of course use a hand saw.

Cutting the hole is easier with a circular saw but you can also use a jigsaw or a hand saw.

A complete window hole cut. Do not worry if you are not 100% straight in your cut as any slight deviations will be hidden behind the fascia.

You can offer up the window to check for fitment.

Final Fitting of the Generic Window

You can now fit the fascias on the outside of the window, again, like the spacers you can either screw or nail them onto the frame. I personally think screws are far better but it is up to you.

Fit the fascia to the outside of the window frame onto the spacers.

When you are working with wood it is always highly advisable to pilot hole anything you are going to be screwing or nailing.

Always use a pilot hole when screwing or nailing one piece of wood to another.

Once all four of the outside fascia has been fitted you can then place the window into the hole. In the next picture we have done this from the outside. Notice one single screw used in the centre of the top fascia, this is to loosely secure the window so it can be completed from the inside single handedly. It is of course better if you have someone holding it for you.

Note the screw will be removed once the window is installed.

Complete window fitted from the outside of the log cabin, loosely held in place by one screw at the top to make it easier to fit. The screw is of course later removed.

The fascias are fitted to the inside and the ‘helping screw’ outside is removed and the window is complete.

There we have the completed window!

A Few Window Notes:

Fitting a window is not too hard at all, just consider you expansion and contraction gaps, also the old saying of ‘measure twice cut once’ is very relevant.

Over the first year as the seasons change, periodically check your gap above the window, you can easily remove the top fascia to check behind it.

If security is a concern you can:

  • Countersink your screws and use wood filler mixed with sawdust to hide your screws on the outside fascia.
  • You can use Philips head screws and once installed drill the head so it can no longer be used.
  • Use security screws.

Wolfgang Log Cabin Feature

On the Wolfgang Log Cabin product page, we like to give you the nitty gritties of the product in terms of dimensions, technical installation tips and the best feature of said product.

But, on this page we let our previous customers voice their opinion on the Wolfgang Log Cabin and let them show you their thoughts, ideas and pictures! So here goes.

The Wolfgang Log Cabin

Wolfgang 45mm log cabin with integral shed

A unique style, manufactured using 45mm interlocking logs with straight cut logs (not diamond as may be shown later), the Wolfgang Log Cabin features a wide, low pitched roof for a cosy and homely feel. Other features include the side annexe for storage purposes, double glazed windows and doors and a height of 2.5m- Making it suitable for most UK gardens without planning permission, always check with your local council though! Overall the Wolfgang Log Cabin measures to 5.3m x 4.5m

Reviews:

With all of these features, you can really see why we love the Wolfgang and our customers agree too- with an average customer rating of five stars. Here are a few excerpts from some of the Wolfgang Log Cabin Reviews:

“I can now understand why there are so many 5 star reviews for tuindeco products. Delighted with my purchase of a Wolfgang cabin. High quality workmanship and excellent service. I would highly recommend this company.”- Mr. R O’Donnell  

“Superb piece of engineering! The only way it could have been easier is if it had been a pop-up version! Would highly recommend this cabin.”- Mr. C Wood
“Wolfgang Log Cabin 5.3m x 3.0m/4.5m double glazed. The whole experience from order to delivery and installation has been positive with emails and queries responded to quickly and promptly providing a stress free process. Overall this has been a trouble free build and the quality is fantastic. I would recommend this Cabin and Tuin to anyone. Enjoy your build.”- Mr. P Martin
We also have a more detailed report of the Wolfgang, written by Richard, of the timing it will take to install the Wolfgang depending on your confidence and experience:

Installation:

The installation for the Wolfgang Log Cabin is a simple process, so long as you keep organised. You can find loads of information in order to be fully prepared for installing your Log Cabin on the Essential Installation Manual as well as plenty of other Log Cabin Fitting Tips throughout the blog, from our expert (practically), Richard.

Here is one of our favourite installation sets of images:

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Installed:

And when installed and treated/painted… Its just a showstopper… Here are just a few of our favourite customer installs:

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Videos:

We have also received a few videos, so you can experience the Wolfgang Log Cabin from all angles, simply click on one below to start watching:

Customer Pictures:

If you would like to see more photos from customers please click on the picture below – Note: This will take you to our customers photo gallery hosted by Google Photos. Pictures may show older models or customer own modifications.

Customer pictures of the Wolfgang log cabin

The 45mm double glazed wolfgang, paired with Roof and Floor Insulation is a recipe for a perfect summerhouse!

The Wolfgang Log Cabin

Wolfgang 45mm log cabin with integral shed

For more details such as measurements and the breakdown of what comes within the self build kit, please look at the Wolfgang Log Cabin product page.

If the Wolfgang isnt quite what you imagined for your garden, discover the Clockhouse Log Cabin and the Lukas Log Cabin.

Agnes Log Cabin Feature

On the Agnes Log Cabin product page, we show you plenty of images of our customer’s Log Cabin to show you what you can do with them. As well as all the fine details on the dimensions, technical tips as well as our quality checks for each Log Cabin.

But, understandably, that just doesn’t do the Log Cabin enough justice. That’s why on this page we’ve collected as many pictures, videos and detailed reviews as we can to create this customer feature page, so here goes:

The Agnes Log Cabin With Shed Annexe

A 3.0m x 4.4m Shed And Summer House In One

Built using first rate timber from the Spruce trees of Sweden the 45mm Agnes Log Cabin measures 3.0 x 4.4m. Featuring double doors, two opening windows and separate access door to the shed annexe with a full height partition to ensure clear distinction between the two components.

Reviews:

With the double glazed double doors and two opening windows, you can see why the Agnes is preferable and our customers agree too- with an average customer rating of five stars. Here are a few excerpts from some of the Agnes Log Cabin Reviews:

“Just finished our Agnes summerhouse/shed, and very pleased with results and would recommend this to anyone with reasonable DIY skills. I also put insulation under the floor in the summerhouse area so we can make use of it in winter. I found the main door into the summerhouse tricky to assemble, but Tuin were able to provide very quick responses to my queries and help me on my way.” – Mr. C McMillen 

“This cabin is fantastic! It’s so nice I’ve recommended a friend to buy one!!
It’s top quality, logs are great quality and the quality of the doors are best I’ve seen. Very happy with the finished result and it sits lovely in the garden” -Mr. M Thompson 

“Delivery made easy with the transport company using their on board forklift. 4 hours later I had the Agnes cabin structure fully assembled on my own instructions easy to follow. Next day roof and doors installed with ease as again instructions were clear and simple to follow.The quality of the cabin is of a high standard and extremely attractive to look at. Storage area very spacious and the cabin is a good size for our purposes.” – Mr. T Taggart 

We also have a more detailed customer review, if you would like a little more in depth opinions backed with pictures of the installation process:

Installation:

The installation for the Agnes Log Cabin is a simple process, so long as you keep organised. You can find loads of information in order to be fully prepared for installing your Log Cabin on the Essential Installation Manual  as well as plenty of other Log Cabin Fitting Tips throughout the blog, from our expert (practically), Richard.

Here are one of our favourite installation sets of images:

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Installed:

And when installed and treated/painted… It really is brimming with potential.. Here are just a few of our favourite customer installs:

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Videos:

We have also received videos, so you can experience the Agnes Log Cabin from all angles, simply click on one below to start watching:

Customer Pictures:

If you would like to see more photo’s from customers please click on the picture below – Note: This will take you to our customers photo gallery hosted by Google Photos. Pictures may show older models or customer own modifications.

Agnes log cabin customer gallery.

With the additional side storage space and 45mm logs, the Agnes Log Cabin is ideal for a summerhouse or home office- even more!

The Agnes Log Cabin With Shed Annexe

A 3.0m x 4.4m Shed And Summerhouse In One

For more details such as measurements and the breakdown of what comes within the self build kit, please look at the Agnes Log Cabin product page.

If the Agnes doesn’t quite meet your fancy, then maybe you’ll prefer the: Emma Log Cabin, Asmund Log Cabin or the Aiste Log Cabin.

Jenny Log Cabin Review

I’ve been so excited to share this with you guys since I’ve seen this come through in my email, so thank you to Mr T for sending this in and making a bright situation in such gloomy weather. Lets see how they turned their Jenny Log Cabin into a Cabin you couldnt miss from a mile away!


Mr T writes as follows: 

This is my overview and review and of my Jenny Log Cabin build, from Tuin.

I took a long time deliberating between different type of Cabin; sizes, profile, make and design and eventually settle for a Jenny Log Cabin from Tuin. It is 4.5 x 3.5m, which is slightly better in my opinion than the original 5.0×3.0m I was thinking of. The more square layout gives better usable space IMO.

I opted for the Jenny for the combination of design (I wanted a reverse apex design as it gives a better “frontage” yet doesn’t appear overly large), thickness of logs and Georgian-style doors and windows. It was going to be my garden gym, which probably mean it will be a summer playroom for me and the boys.

The seed started when we first move here just over 3 years ago. The garden was very overgrown with some very unkept Cherry Laurel that have overtaken almost a third of our garden. Hidden within this was a 6×10′ shed which has seen better days. We decided that it needed replacement. However, the shed stood on a concrete foundation that must have been created after the laurel have had many years to spread out. As such it was awkwardly positioned well out into the middle of our garden, to one side. Keeping a shed there will not do at all and we also wanted something a bit better – much better. Our search expanded to log cabins and that was when it all started.

Having chosen the Jenny, we needed to expand the concrete foundation as the existing foundation was too small. We toyed with the idea of just adding to the existing foundation but given its undesirable position, we ended up needing a new foundation entirely. A tradesman was called in for this and, given we would still need a shed of some sort, we wanted to have a single foundation that would cater for both the Jenny and a shed next to it – efficiency is the buzzword after all, especially since the tradesman will be doing this at the same time.

Anyway, back to the real story about Jenny. The package arrived well packaged delivered by a large articulated HGV straight from Holland with a forklift attached. It scared the neighbours silly when the forklift drove down our road with the package (5m long) across the road but luckily the forklift has some amazing manoeuvrability and the package was neatly deposited on our drive. It did stay there for a couple of weeks untouched as I needed to ensure the space was ready to receive it.

The Packaged Jenny Log Cabin

When there was finally a good weekend-weather window the job begins. On unpacking and taking inventory, there were quite a few “additional” planks which were used to securely package the items. However, this also makes it quite a challenge to determine which are originals and which are packing planks.

As usual, some of the wall log pieces were a bit warped but the video from Turin reassured me that this is quite normal as there are techniques to deal with warped wall planks since they interlock.

There were also a couple of very long (5m) square planks which, for whatever reasons, were extremely warped but at the time I thought little of them thinking there will no doubt be ways to deal with them. These were in fact the eave slats for the roof (used to stiffen the edge of the roof board and provide a surface to nail the fascia covering) as I later discovered and turns out to be a much bigger problem than I anticipated

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So first step was to lay the foundation beams. I bought the recycled plastic foundation beams as these would never rot. Getting these cut to the right size and angle was actually quite a challenge as they are just slightly too big for my mitre block. In addition, as they only comes in 3m length I had to join them for all 4 walls – well 3 actually as the front has the gap for the door anyway. Given the importance of getting the foundation absolutely squared, this was IMO the most critical step in the entire build. With the unpacking/checking and moving the logs into the garden ready for the build, setting the foundation layer took me into the following day. In fact, it took me almost another 2 hours the next day before I was happy to proceed. I also had the help of my lovely wife to check the squareness of the base layer as once it started going up, you don’t want to undo it!

Log Cabin Base

Before I started the build, I also laid down a layer of DPM (plastic membrane used to prevent rising damp). I know the advice was only to lay it under the foundation pieces and then, once the build is completed and the floor is ready to be laid, to add the floor covering at that stage since it could get punctured during the build. To be honest, the DPM did get a bit battered with all the foot traffic but they stayed intact. In any case they were cheap enough that I bought twice the required amount which allows me to have a second layer once I am ready to install the floor. With 2 layers of DPM I think I am pretty protected from rising damp!

Jenny Cabin Installation With DPM

Once the foundation layer is in place, the walls go up surprisingly quickly. You do need a good (heavy) rubber mallet for this which was something I found invaluable. I bought a 32oz (about 1kg) white rubber mallet just in case my (smaller) black one would leave marks but was very glad for the heavier mallet, which really help to hammer the logs into place. The few pieces that were warped were helped into place using a couple of good, strong Irwin Quick Grip XP clamps. The door frames (which needed to be put together from the 4 separate pieces) goes in after 5/6 layers of wall logs. BTW, be careful when putting together the door frame especially the stainless metal covering the bottom piece – it is very sharp and will easily slice your fingers. Don’t ask how I know.

The windows go in once you get up to the right level. Be sure to get the window frames down squarely and adequately as if not, you may find later that the first full length log will not fit. It had me scratching head for quite some time before I figured this out.

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Once the final wall logs are in place, it is time to fit the apex logs. At first, I was worried that it would be in one piece (which can be quite heavy) as you will need to raise it quite high. However, it comes in normal, log size pieces which interlocks into each other via T&G so quite easy to install in the end. Installing the long roof purlins fixes the apexes in place and make the whole structure very stable. Next step is installing the roof boards!

Jenny Roof Purlins

Installing the roof was the most onerous job in my build. The fact that the cabin is sited close to the edge of our property and under the existing hedging conifers (which I wanted to keep as much as possible) means that one half of the roof had to be installed under the conifers. Installing the roof boards was actually not so hard as you can do this from inside the cabin using a step ladder/platform, but the roof shingles was an entirely different challenge. Also, because of the proximity of the conifer I ended up having to jigsaw off about 5cm along the entire length of the roof once it was already in place – due to the proximity of one of the conifer tree.

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Once the roof boards are on, it was time to install the shingles. These came free with the cabin and we got the rectangular one. We would have preferred the hexagonal shingles but as it is free, one cannot complain. This took quite some time to complete especially the half that is under the conifers. I had to crawl along the roof under the conifers with very little headroom whilst measuring, cutting and nailing the shingles in place. It was the hardest part of the build but also a tremendous sense of achievement once completed. I have to admit the shingles really finish off the cabin in fine style.

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We also bought the floor kit with the cabin, since this finishes off the cabin nicely. The thought of using OSB boards after the personal effort and attention of the build makes me cringes. As the floor is inside, there was no real rush to do this but unfortunately, there were a couple of weekends of heavy rain so exterior work has to wait. The floor boards were installed in a similar fashion to the roof boards (in fact, I think they are the same except for the numerous finger joints that exist with the floor boards) but here you have to cut all the boards at exactly the right place in order to ensure both pieces can be supported by a floor joists at the joint. I used plenty of nails and luckily there were plenty supplied.

I was really keen to ensure the exterior of the cabin is protected ASAP. For this we got Sickens Rubal Saturn Plus in a specially mixed colour, with complimentary shade for the door and windows. These are the “thickest” protectant we could found which is recommended by Tuin. We also got the Rubal Undercoat to make sure the final colour is nice and uniform and to give it 3 coats in total – I don’t intend to have to repeat this in the future and the attention and details will only be justifiable when the whole thing is “nice & new”. These paints were really good – nice and thick with strong opacity but boy, they do take some effort. Luckily, there were quite a few days of good sunshine, but I had to take extra days off work just to make sure the painting was completed.

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With everything completed, it was time to deal with the interior. We wanted to keep the natural wood look inside but thought it best that the floor is protected. Unfortunately, there doesn’t seem to be clear equivalent of the Sickens Rubal, so we ended up with Tuin’s own recommended Carefree Protectant Timber Treatment. We don’t need that much but as you have to order 2 tins, we thought that if they are anywhere as good as claimed, we would be more than happy to use them for our garden furniture as well. Applying the Wood Protectant to the floor was very quick and the Protectant goes on extremely easily – almost like painting on water in fact. Once we have applied one coat of the Wood Protectant we apply another, normal coat of wood varnish to reduce wear. This also gives it a slightly darker shade, which is actually quite nice.

Overall, I am very pleased with the quality of the Jenny Log Cabin and the service from Tuin. I would definitely recommend Tuin for their quality cabins which are quite reasonable price-wise. The free shingles, if you get them, is a no-brainier and really completes your build.

A few thoughts and tips from my experience:

  1. Use some good, large brushes when applying the protectant to the exterior. There is so much surface that you will be glad to have a decent brush which can cover the area quickly.
  2. Be careful when installing the Georgian door & window frames. The frames are very simple wood strips which you have to nail to the door/windows. They are not bespoke made so can leave some doubts as to how they fit. In addition, they are not really long enough thus leaving little space to put the nail. In fact, I cracked both my window panes as the nail hits the glazing. With hindsight I now understand why so many of the builds do not have these frames installed (even on Tuin’s own website).
  3. I would recommend getting the best wood protectant you can find. The amount of work required to do this will outweigh any cost considerations and you will regret using cheap stuff (or just end up doing a sloppy job).
  4. Get a decent rubber mallet (ideally white so that it doesn’t leave marks).
  5. Make sure you have a good set of strong quick grip clamps as you will need these when installing warped logs or the roofing eave slats. They are also an extra pair of hands which you will find invaluable at times.
  6. Take your time with the roof shingles (if you are using them). They take some time to install but the quality and appearance of a well laid roof shingles really add the cherry to the cake.
  7. With the cost of the cabin and effort required to build, I would strongly recommend getting at least 2 layers of DPM so that the interior and floor are protected from any rising damp. They are also not expensive.
  8. You will most likely need an impact driver to install the first layer of logs onto the foundations beams. If not be prepared for some cursing and sore hands.

If you do decide to go for one of these log cabin, be prepared for some real hands-on action and I hope the above write-up would provide some assurance. I am a reasonable DIYer but nothing in this build can be considered difficult. The initial start is the most anxious part but once you are on your way, it is really not that difficult – certainly within the capability of most competent DIYers. The satisfaction and sense of pride after its completion, however, will be there to enjoy for decades thereafter. Good luck with your build.

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Thank you to Mr T for such a lengthy and informative review! As for some of your confusion that you guys may have with the window and door frames- They are for decoration purposes and aren’t very thick in terms of the timber. For the Georgian look you will have to be careful with installing them, some people tend to opt out for them as they don’t like the look- But they are featured on some of our showsite buildings!

Why not look into the Jenny Log Cabin for your unique garden canvas?

For more in depth customer reviews such as Mr T’s, browse through our Pictorial Customer Reviews.

Berlin Log Cabin Feature

On the Berlin Log Cabin product page, we like to give you the nitty gritties of the product in terms of dimensions, technical installation tips and the best feature of said product.

But, on this page we let our previous customers voice their opinion on the Berlin Log Cabin and let them show you their thoughts, ideas and pictures! We may also have our team input why they desire that particular product too, so here goes..

Berlin Log Cabin

Berlin Log Cabin with internal room and mezzanine floor

A large building from our private label range of log cabins. This building features two rooms and an upper level floor, measuring at 4.90m x 5.30m with 45mm thick logs and double glazed windows the Berlin is ideal for use as a home office, gym or additional accommodation. Featuring both double and single doors with three tilt and turn windows to give you plenty of access and natural light.

Reviews:

With all of these features, you can really see why we love the Berlin and our customers agree too- with an average customer rating of five stars. Here are a few excerpts from some of the many Berlin Log Cabin Reviews:

“From ordering, all the way to delivery, everything was smooth. The images of the Berlin cabin really doesn’t do it justice on the site. I was absolutely over the moon with this cabin and the quality of the wood. Great deal and a great buy” -Mr. H Shepherd

“The quality of the product was excellent . Putting it together was quite straight forward [ with the help of the manual and drawings ] .An enjoyable task. Overall excellent” – Mr. P Wynne 

“The cabin arrived really well packaged on two pallets. You do need lots of space to lay out the logs as they are mixed through both pallets. Very pleased with the quality of the product and would purchase from Tuin again in the future. Would recommend to others.” -Mrs L McNeish 

Installation:

The installation for the Berlin Log Cabin is a simple process, so long as you keep organised. You can find loads of information in order to be fully prepared for installing your Log Cabin on the Essential Installation Manual as well as plenty of other Log Cabin Fitting Tips throughout the blog, from our expert (practically), Richard.

Here is one of our favourite installation sets of images:

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Installed:

And when installed and treated/painted… Its just a showstopper… Here are just a few of our favourite customer installs:

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Customer Pictures:

If you would like to see more photo’s from customers please click on the picture below – Note: This will take you to our customers photo gallery hosted by Google Photos. Pictures may show older models or customer own modifications.

Berlin Log Cabin Customer Gallery

When paired with some Roof and Floor Insulation, the Berlin is the ideal size for some additional accommodation in your garden, or even your own hideaway to let your creativity run wild.

Berlin Log Cabin

Berlin Log Cabin with internal room and mezzanine floor

For more details such as measurements and the breakdown of what comes within the self build kit, please look at the Berlin Log Cabin product page.

If you’d prefer a thicker log for better heat capacity, we recommend you reading about the Blackpool Log Cabin, the Stian Log Cabin or even the Ben Clockhouse Log Cabin.

 

Julia Log Cabin

We have received a customer review from Mr P of their experience with installing their Julia Log Cabin. Thank you for sending this in!  We love how the bar turned out- It’s a great idea!


Mr P writes as follows: 

Back in February I purchased a Log Cabin from Tuin.

Several months later I have completed the project, turning it into a bar and brewery. Very pleased with it and your customer support and thought I would share some pictures with you!

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We love the bar and brewery Mr P! Thank you for sending in your images, we hope the brewing turns out well!

Other customer experiences, build articles and ideas can be found at: Pictorial Tuin Reviews.

Jenny Log Cabin

Miss M has written this post regarding her journey with the Jenny log cabin that she has bought, this may be of interest to you if you are considering the Jenny 40mm Log Cabin Miss M wrote:


I decided that I wanted to buy a cabin after getting a quote for an extension. It was well beyond my means so a cabin seemed a logical solution to accommodate extra space for growing teenagers. After searching around on the internet, and visiting high street outlets such as B & Q I decided to purchase a cabin from TUIN. Prior to purchase I had spoken to their customer services department and run through a couple of ideas that I had. For example, would it be suitable for my needs? What about installation? On the occasions that I called I was given some very sound advice which made me feel confident in my purchase. The team were incredibly knowledgeable about their products. I decided that I would buy the ‘Jenny’ log cabin. I wanted to maximise the space that I had, and this seemed perfect my needs. After placing my order with the team, and a few final questions I sat back and waited for delivery!!!

The delivery arrived on time, and was delivered by a very friendly haulier with a great forklift – it came beautifully packed.

Log cabin pallet delivered.

After having a double garage removed, this was the space that the cabin would occupy. Tucked in the corner on my old patio. 

The guys arrived to install the cabin! How exciting! They were incredibly courteous and  I kept them supplied in tea!

I was amazed at how quickly and neatly they worked and it was completed in a day – amazing!

Jenny log cabin roof purlins being fitted

A strong roof!

The fitting has been finished, all in one day!

And now my hard work begins!!!!  I managed to treat the sides of the cabin with a long handled roller – and talking very nicely to my neighbour to get round the back!!!

First coat of primer…….

My finished Jenny Log Cabin 🙂

Finished Jenny Log Cabin

Jenny log cabin floor

Jenny log cabin finished!

Thank you Miss M for taking the time to post this, it is always much appreciated by me and is very useful for other, we hope you enjoy the thank you present.

Other customer experiences, builds and ideas can be enjoyed here: Pictorial Tuin Reviews